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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a sample/template of Standard Operating Procedures for Electrical Contracting company they would be willing to share?
 

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Low Voltage, Multi-Family Residential Electrical Construction, Fire Alarm and Life Safety
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Can you go more in depth? SOP for your office? Or for the field workers? And are you referring to general day-to-day business operations or are you talking about how do run a project from start to finish?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can you go more in depth? SOP for your office? Or for the field workers? And are you referring to general day-to-day business operations or are you talking about how do run a project from start to finish?
SOP for field workers on electrical jobs. I would take help on general day-to-day business operations as well as how to run project start to finish. Anything will help me.
 

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Depends on what type of work your company is involved in, but to me, checklists are a great asset. Ive always done great with them.

Something like this for the technician to go through on the iPad after each job would be helpful.
example:
Pictures of area before work starts
Pictures of electrical installation after completion
Pictures of area showing cleanup was done
Is the conduit or wiring strapped and secured?
Is the breaker sized correctly?
Is the new disconnect for the xxxx within sight of or within 50ft of the new equipment?
Are all the inside penetrations fire caulked and outside penetrations siliconed?
Is the new equipment running at this time? If not, please explain why _.
Do you have a signature from the client/customer?
Is the inspection ready to be called in?
Have you collected the payment?
 

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Power distribution and controls
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SOP for field workers on electrical jobs. I would take help on general day-to-day business operations as well as how to run project start to finish. Anything will help me.
I do not mean to offend, but I find your lack of knowledge of the trade is a dis-qualifier for my assistance. Running a shop or a job by a manual is just laughable from my perspective.
You expect to put on a piece of paper every condition that could be present on a construction site. Talking to the lead/foremen who provide guidance from the companies stand point is about all you can do.

When I had my company everyone signed a piece of paper that stated.
Drugs or alcohol on a job site is grounds for termination.
Drugs or alcohol in a company vehicle is a termination event.
Everyone is expected to have their tools and safety equipment as needed by the job site.
2 violations and you will be terminated.

My partner and I would be sure that one of us was on site every day. We at the peak had close to 250 people working for us. I was on every job site every other Friday for payday. Usually had a list of 20 people wanting to come to work for us.

I kept short hand notebooks of excuses for being late or not showing up. Had 6 of them on both side of the paper when we closed the doors, These were unique excuses . One guy brought his alarm clock to the office with bullet holes in it, with the gun in the other hand. I gave him another chance and he was never late or absent with out notice again.
 

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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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I do not mean to offend, but I find your lack of knowledge of the trade is a dis-qualifier for my assistance. Running a shop or a job by a manual is just laughable from my perspective.
You expect to put on a piece of paper every condition that could be present on a construction site. Talking to the lead/foremen who provide guidance from the companies stand point is about all you can do.

When I had my company everyone signed a piece of paper that stated.
Drugs or alcohol on a job site is grounds for termination.
Drugs or alcohol in a company vehicle is a termination event.
Everyone is expected to have their tools and safety equipment as needed by the job site.
2 violations and you will be terminated.

My partner and I would be sure that one of us was on site every day. We at the peak had close to 250 people working for us. I was on every job site every other Friday for payday. Usually had a list of 20 people wanting to come to work for us.

I kept short hand notebooks of excuses for being late or not showing up. Had 6 of them on both side of the paper when we closed the doors, These were unique excuses . One guy brought his alarm clock to the office with bullet holes in it, with the gun in the other hand. I gave him another chance and he was never late or absent with out notice again.
The OP might have came from the corporate sector where everything one does is governed by an SOP. I worked briefly in a corporate setting and they had a SOP for changing light bulbs, taking out the trash, sweeping the floor along with many other minor tasks.
 

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industrial E,I&C
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It's a strange question, and not one an electrical contractor or other industry professional would be likely to ask.

Its not strange at all if you do government work.

My sop states that i have to report to the site supervisor when i arrive on site then attend a tail board safety meeting so everyone is one the same page before we start work.
Then covid came along.

We spend alot of time writing sop's for the operators which are then printed out and added to there sop binder. They become very specific like a step by step guide rather than generic instructions. Im just not sure you can do more than a reporting/safety/house keeping sop for a construction site.
 

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industrial E,I&C
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The OP might have came from the corporate sector where everything one does is governed by an SOP. I worked briefly in a corporate setting and they had a SOP for changing light bulbs, taking out the trash, sweeping the floor along with many other minor tasks.
We generally refer to these as covering the company's arse in case you get hurt instructions.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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Its not strange at all if you do government work.
I don't think it's unusual for a government, industrial, institutional site to have SOPs and O&Ms and all that doctrine, and when working in those places electrical contractors like everyone else has to abide, but I think it's unusual for an electrical contracting company to have in-house SOPs.

This is the kind of question someone that used to work at the EPA and now works in ABC Electrical's HR department would ask.
 

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You could have an SOP for say... installing a circuit and receptacle. An SOP for how to run a project start to finish is not something that could be "SOP." This is not an electrical contractor making this request. Or even someone whith any construction knowledge or experience.
 

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Chief Flunky
Field Service Engineer
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We get this from time to time.

Realistically many companies issue SOPs because they have bureaucrats. But why have anything written down? Ever play the game whisper down the lane? The problem with having instructions passed down by word of mouth is that things get left out, forgotten, etc. How many knockout punches have been damaged by incorrect use?

I agree that taking 2 minutes to walk down a job is the best way for the entire crew to review what they are doing. That a lift plan is best planned on the job site. That project work is different from production. .If you are in a widget plant you make widgets that are hopefully all identical. On a construction site you are doing something never done before. After it is done you won’t ever do it again. That’s the overall job. But within that job there are tons of tasks that you do every day that are the same task over and over again. It probably is stupid to write an SOP to stay off the bottle and drugs while at work even if some guys have a hard time learning that one. You don’t give detailed instructions on how to not do it. But some tasks are best learned and reminded by SOP. Those are the ones you need.
 

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Master Electrician - Ontario
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Policy is for direction and SOP are for the "how to".

No drugs, no booze, no horseplay = policy
Discipline for above = policy
How to implement the discipline for the above = SOP

Most SOP for electrical installations essentially are in the code book. It is for all the other stuff that you may want a policy or an SOP for.

Employees shall not use personal vehicles for company work; employees will be responsible for the daily care an cleanliness of the company vehicle in their responsibility = policy

Daily Care and Cleanliness of Company Vehicles = SOP

1. Ensure the fuel is checked daily and when it approaches 50%, fill it up;
2. Check the oil level daily. Add oil as required;
3. Check the windshield washer level and when it approaches 50%, fill it up;
Etc

Over the years, I have found that people tend to mix and match policy with SOP. Policy should be more "global" and intentionally vague so the SOP can be modified as required. Changing policy is usually a "high level" decision, where SOPs are created at the lower level that are more intimate with the specific issue that needs an SOP.

I will share one of ours for Apprentices.

Cheers
John
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
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I don't think it's unusual for a government, industrial, institutional site to have SOPs and O&Ms and all that doctrine, and when working in those places electrical contractors like everyone else has to abide, but I think it's unusual for an electrical contracting company to have in-house SOPs.

This is the kind of question someone that used to work at the EPA and now works in ABC Electrical's HR department would ask.
It's the new world order of things to have everything on a digital checklist to keep all the robots uniform.
 
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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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SOP
1) Get up early and work until dark.
2) Forget about weekends and holidays
3) Learn to write contracts and to recognize bullshit
You are probably going to get a lot of "likes" for this comment.
 
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