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Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
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Does anyone have a sample/template of Standard Operating Procedures for Electrical Contracting company they would be willing to share?
I see you're in indianapolis. That said for a small fee ($200k) I'd gladly come out and observe your company and write out (in detail) any SOPs you'd like once the temps are at least in the 60F range.
 

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SOP
1) Get up early and work until dark.
2) Forget about weekends and holidays
3) Learn to write contracts and to recognize bullshit
I forgot #4, the most important one.

Once you have mastered 1,2 & 3, work on making the business run without you.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Depends on what type of work your company is involved in, but to me, checklists are a great asset. Ive always done great with them.

Something like this for the technician to go through on the iPad after each job would be helpful.
example:
Pictures of area before work starts
Pictures of electrical installation after completion
Pictures of area showing cleanup was done
Is the conduit or wiring strapped and secured?
Is the breaker sized correctly?
Is the new disconnect for the xxxx within sight of or within 50ft of the new equipment?
Are all the inside penetrations fire caulked and outside penetrations siliconed?
Is the new equipment running at this time? If not, please explain why _.
Do you have a signature from the client/customer?
Is the inspection ready to be called in?
Have you collected the payment?
 

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Electrical Contractor
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Depends on what type of work your company is involved in, but to me, checklists are a great asset. Ive always done great with them.

Something like this for the technician to go through on the iPad after each job would be helpful.
example:
Pictures of area before work starts
Pictures of electrical installation after completion
Pictures of area showing cleanup was done
Is the conduit or wiring strapped and secured?
Is the breaker sized correctly?
Is the new disconnect for the xxxx within sight of or within 50ft of the new equipment?
Are all the inside penetrations fire caulked and outside penetrations siliconed?
Is the new equipment running at this time? If not, please explain why _.
Do you have a signature from the client/customer?
Is the inspection ready to be called in?
Have you collected the payment?
Thank you!
 

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7,127 Posts
You need to be more specific. The SOP for a group of workers on a gangbox job managed by a foreman is significantly different from a solo tech running a service truck.
You left out union vs. non union shop, one of the two has a lot more breaks and sick time in their SOP.
 

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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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1,350 Posts
MHElectric had a good basic run down of what we should do but most experienced people do them already. From what I remember about SOPs, they were mainly for inexperienced people. The company would hire marginally qualified people and have them read the SOP and sign off that they understood it. They felt that changing 277 volt ballasts or switches was no big deal. I guess we could look at an SOP as "friendly reminders" to protect the company, the employer, and the employee. Maybe add to the SOP a 15 minute daily safety meeting. This way it shows you are concerned about safety.
 

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Scada Supervisor
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When I took my small business class they wanted:
A business plan updated regularly.
They wanted SOP's of common things.
They wanted business policies.
On and on.

I was a one man show and they wanted policy's, really. I could see SOP for legal reasons so things were documented.
Cowboy
 

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Band Member
DIYer Extrodinaire
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7,402 Posts
SOP
1) Get up early and work until dark.
2) Forget about weekends and holidays
3) Learn to write contracts and to recognize bullshit
The last part of #3 would explain the smell since reading the OP 💩

My BS sensor is saying watch for the next ET newsletter with 'SOPs for ECs' :p
 

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Residential and Commercial Electrical contracting. Non Union
Thanks....Most companies I worked for had company standards books that outlined basic company policy on everything from hygiene, appearance, safety, controlled substance, etc.
I worked for a company in the early eighties that one of the largest EC's in the US, for certain in Texas. We had an SOP manual that was a foot thick. It covered invoicing, PO procedures, change orders, mat/lab cost breakdowns, labor coding, inventory....blah, blah...it was ridiculous. It wound up being his downfall
I think that was what you are referring.......

Every company since were just common Estimating/PM/Superintendent practices were more unwritten policies but based on decades of in-office experience and was driven by our main accounting software, estimating/PM/scheduling and close out procedures....Job flow procedures were the same on every job...vet the estimate, pre-bid meetings, pre-construction meeting, weekly meeting for all ongoing projects, etc. Those are pretty simple outlines you can do and tweak along the way, using your software as a guide.
 

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NIce....you have no clue what she's even asking for do you?
No, of course not. It's as vague a question as you can get.

She was asked some questions to clarify, and all she came back with was ...
Residential and Commercial Electrical contracting. Non Union

My BS detector is working just fine ;)
 

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Thanks....Most companies I worked for had company standards books that outlined basic company policy on everything from hygiene, appearance, safety, controlled substance, etc.
I worked for a company in the early eighties that one of the largest EC's in the US, for certain in Texas. We had an SOP manual that was a foot thick. It covered invoicing, PO procedures, change orders, mat/lab cost breakdowns, labor coding, inventory....blah, blah...it was ridiculous. It wound up being his downfall
I think that was what you are referring.......

Every company since were just common Estimating/PM/Superintendent practices were more unwritten policies but based on decades of in-office experience and was driven by our main accounting software, estimating/PM/scheduling and close out procedures....Job flow procedures were the same on every job...vet the estimate, pre-bid meetings, pre-construction meeting, weekly meeting for all ongoing projects, etc. Those are pretty simple outlines you can do and tweak along the way, using your software as a guide.
Roger’s?
 

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No, of course not. It's as vague a question as you can get.

She was asked some questions to clarify, and all she came back with was ...
Residential and Commercial Electrical contracting. Non Union

My BS detector is working just fine ;)
It's probably vague if if never worked for a company that had SOP's...but to be fair, they exist...but it's for office/management personel
 

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Hackenschmidt
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Do you think this company's SOP for writing SOP's is to basically ask on the internet if anyone will let them copy their homework?
 

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Do you think this company's SOP for writing SOP's is to basically ask on the internet if anyone will let them copy their homework?
No more idiotic than asking people on the internet how much does it cost to wire a Dollar General or a 3400 sq/ft house...in fact it's way less idiotic

which happens every day btw.....
 

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It's probably vague if if never worked for a company that had SOP's...but to be fair, they exist...but it's for office/management personel
Wrong, if you work in a manufacturing environment.
We have SOP's for the office personnel, the machine operators and the maintenance group.
In maintenance we have procedures (SOP) for shutting down and starting up equipment.
Whether for repairs or when not in use.
Some of our equipment requires it to be shutdown in a sequence, if not shutdown according to SOP, start up is a PITA.
Troubleshooting equipment problems are another SOP that you probably don't realize is a SOP.
If you are troubleshooting an electrical problem you follow a sequence of investigation.
Something simple, such as a light being out in an office, do you run find the breaker panel or check to see if the light switch is ON.
OK, light switch on, what's next?
That is what a SOP does, it sets up a sequence of events, that when followed leads to the desired outcome.
You have probably doing SOP's and never realized you were doing them because it’s in your head, not necessarily on paper.
SOP's may contain a list of items you need.
Running conduit? What tools do you need?
Just giving examples of things most electricians already know.
I write SOP's for troubleshooting electrical equipment. We have 4 shifts with 2 to 4 men per shift.
I need to create lists of things to look for BEFORE they get out the laptop.
Most of these guys are great mechanics but only know a little bit about electrical.
The troubleshooting SOP's gives them an opportunity to figure it out, which keeps them from calling and waking me up for something simple such as an E-stop accidentally pushed.
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
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61,596 Posts
Wrong, if you work in a manufacturing environment.
We have SOP's for the office personnel, the machine operators and the maintenance group.
In maintenance we have procedures (SOP) for shutting down and starting up equipment.
Whether for repairs or when not in use.
Some of our equipment requires it to be shutdown in a sequence, if not shutdown according to SOP, start up is a PITA.
Troubleshooting equipment problems are another SOP that you probably don't realize is a SOP.
If you are troubleshooting an electrical problem you follow a sequence of investigation.
Something simple, such as a light being out in an office, do you run find the breaker panel or check to see if the light switch is ON.
OK, light switch on, what's next?
That is what a SOP does, it sets up a sequence of events, that when followed leads to the desired outcome.
You have probably doing SOP's and never realized you were doing them because it’s in your head, not necessarily on paper.
SOP's may contain a list of items you need.
Running conduit? What tools do you need?
Just giving examples of things most electricians already know.
I write SOP's for troubleshooting electrical equipment. We have 4 shifts with 2 to 4 men per shift.
I need to create lists of things to look for BEFORE they get out the laptop.
Most of these guys are great mechanics but only know a little bit about electrical.
The troubleshooting SOP's gives them an opportunity to figure it out, which keeps them from calling and waking me up for something simple such as an E-stop accidentally pushed.
While I understand where you are coming from this has little relevance to say a residential electrical company doing new construction.

Procedures for any business are generally unique to that business and most won't be useful to a company operating in a different speciality.

Bottom line, a company would have to detail SOPs to their specific need.
 
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