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To make this short, I am a 17 year old senior in high school and I have decided that I want to join this trade over going to a university. I just need some tips and advice.

I've spent a about a month looking into careers/universities and electrician is the only thing that interests me. I love electronics, electrics, and hands-on-jobs. College might be too expensive and I can't see myself behind a desk.

I know there are two routes I can take, Union and Non-Union, and It seems like the two sides have it's pros and cons. I'm not sure which one would be right for me but I've done some research and I believe I need to TRY and join a 5 year apprenticeship program in the IBEW.

My locals are 11 and 18.

I have heard the pay is worth the labor and I am dedicated to work hard to advance towards higher payer jobs. I plan to attend a community college at the same time to have general education plus some courses to increase my knowledge in the field.

Any tips and advice on how to be successful so I won't regret my decision will be great. Job outlook and salary info crosses my mind as well. Lastly, general info on what it is like in the IBEW. :)
 

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To make this short, I am a 17 year old senior in high school and I have decided that I want to join this trade over going to a university. I just need some tips and advice.

I've spent a about a month looking into careers/universities and electrician is the only thing that interests me. I love electronics, electrics, and hands-on-jobs. College might be too expensive and I can't see myself behind a desk.

I know there are two routes I can take, Union and Non-Union, and It seems like the two sides have it's pros and cons. I'm not sure which one would be right for me but I've done some research and I believe I need to TRY and join a 5 year apprenticeship program in the IBEW.

My locals are 11 and 18.

I have heard the pay is worth the labor and I am dedicated to work hard to advance towards higher payer jobs. I plan to attend a community college at the same time to have general education plus some courses to increase my knowledge in the field.

Any tips and advice on how to be successful so I won't regret my decision will be great. Job outlook and salary info crosses my mind as well. Lastly, general info on what it is like in the IBEW. :)

As an apprentice in the IBEW you'll get really good training and they pay for it,so it's a good deal if you can get in.

If you are interested in electronics ,then study motors,controls and PLC's you will be worth top dollar in the electrical trade if you can master that discipline.

Work as hard as you can everyday and always do your best.

Welcome To the electrical trade and ET....:thumbup:
 

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As far as the community college goes, the IEJATC around here includes courses at the local state college to get your associates degree along with the journeyman card. So you might not need to worry about that.
 

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Im a first year now it's a good trade, I've done lots of trenching, plus a few other inside jobs in a big commercial remodel like plugs, pot lights and running conduit. It can be more physical then most people expect I think, recently were gluing lots of PVC conduit in trenches about 3' deep so you need to get on your belly and reach in the trench, get both ends nice and glued so they make a tight bond together. a few days have been rainy so getting nice and muddy. I laugh when people call this the "clean" trade.

I work with apprentices from all over, some are ex-union guys who have done heavy industrial for big oil in northern Alberta, others come from residential new construction companies who aim to rope a rough in a day flat, and plenty of guys who do what we do (medium sized commercial)

We have trained quite a few young guys right out of high school too and they tend to be good workers, but you need the work ethic to be able to do the same thing all day long if required, even if it sucks like trenching or doing hundreds of plugs in a new condo. I am glad I chose this over university though.

I know in Canada everyone has to be an apprentice to work, in the US it seems a little different with unregistered helpers and whatnot and seems to vary by state. I'd try contacting all the larger electrical contractors in your area about getting on as a starter when you're done high school and hopefully getting signed on as an apprentice.
 
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