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I was just curious if you guys separate drive time or let it fly as OT? For example, I've got a project that requires 30 min drive each way and wasn't sure if I should be paying OT on it, charging customer, or what to generally do. My employee drives to my home and picks van up and drops it off. I'm just looking for what's fair.
 

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Labor laws will dictate this. Generally, if it's a company vehicle you must pay them for travel time. Of course you can go above and beyond and compensate them for mileage and/or travel time.
 

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MTW said:
Labor laws will dictate this. Generally, if it's a company vehicle you must pay them for travel time. Of course you can go above and beyond and compensate them for mileage and/or travel time.
Right. I have no intentions of trying to not pay travel time but wasn't sure if I should be paying OT on it.
 

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I don't see how driving is any different than bending pipe. Both are required for our jobs, and no distinction can be made, as far as I'm concerned. If I was working 60hrs I would expect those 20hrs to be paid to my at OT rates, no matter what I was doing. I am still away from my family, helping make money for the company, and if a little extra money is a deal breaker for you, I know it would be for me. Especially if he is driving to your house to pick up the van, then driving back to drop it off.
 

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I had a boss that was very "by the book". We had a similar situation where we would meet at the shop, hop in the truck and drive back to the shop. We were paid for the to the job, but not back to the shop. It never did make much sense to me.
 

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If I pick up a company vehicle the clock starts as soon as I leave the shop.

If it's my own vehicle I will work out what is fair for distance travelled. Usually I donate one hour of driving per day. I made this clear to my employer and do not make a distinction on the time card. In my eyes they should factor in all of these details when they bid the job. If I happen to go over 40 then it should be paid at the OT rate.
 

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If he has to drive back to your house to drop off the van, then yes to being paid OT. IF he was taking the van to his house I'd say no pay. If he were driving his car you wouldn't pay him to drive home. If he were to drive the van you are paying the gas, insurance, and upkeep so you're already reimbursing him for travel. I'd go that route. Cheaper than paying OT.
 

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About 10 years ago I had a discussion with the NCDOL about just this issue. From my understanding, you must pay that employee travel time both ways since the employee is picking up and dropping off the vehicle.

Now, what most people don't know is that drive time can be paid at a different rate than time on the job. You are only required to pay minimum wage. Then, overtime would be paid on the weighted average of the straight time pay.

Now, as far as what is fair, when I was an employee, if you had tried to pay me less for driving, I would be looking for a new employer.

Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.
 

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I had a boss that was very "by the book". We had a similar situation where we would meet at the shop, hop in the truck and drive back to the shop. We were paid for the to the job, but not back to the shop. It never did make much sense to me.
That is a pretty common practice around here, even though it's not technically compliant with labor laws.
 

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Here's how we work it:

Drive to the shop and pick up the company truck:

If you drive to the shop in your personal vehicle to pick up a company vehicle you don't get paid the travel time from your home to the shop (obviously). When you get to the shop you come directly to dispatch, check in and assuming your on time you immediately start getting paid. You get the shop time, travel time, on the job working time and the drive back to the to the shop time or the drive to the next customer time. All paid and if your on overtime...you get overtime. When you get back to the shop and you load your truck for the next day (your option) you get paid. Period...

If the job is near your home you want to take the truck home you get paid to drive home. In the morning you call in to the office from your home and let dispatch know your leaving to either come into the shop or go to the job for the day. Either way, you get paid from the time you leave your house. I don't nickel and dime my employees.

Employees who take the truck home (everyday 365 days a year)
because they are in the rotation to do after hours calls:

All employees who run after hours calls get to take a truck home everyday (if they choose) whether it's their turn to run after hour calls or not.

During regular hours they drive the truck to their first call on their own time. When they are finished for the day they drive home on their own time.
Disclaimer: Be sure to check and confirm your permitted to do this by law in your state.

When they run an after hours call they get paid from the time they leave their home to the time they get back to their home. They get overtime for after hours calls whether they are on overtime or not. They also get $100 of the $250 after hour call out fee. If the customer is a "service agreement" customer they collect $89 and get to keep $50 for themselves. This is all in addition to their overtime pay from portal to portal. If they don't collect anything they get nothing except their hourly overtime pay.

It's all figured into our overhead and thus our pricing.

Nickel and diming your employees who work hard for you is a big mistake in my view; as is paying lower wages for driving time and shop time.

FWIW:)
 

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About 10 years ago I had a discussion with the NCDOL about just this issue. From my understanding, you must pay that employee travel time both ways since the employee is picking up and dropping off the vehicle.

Now, what most people don't know is that drive time can be paid at a different rate than time on the job. You are only required to pay minimum wage. Then, overtime would be paid on the weighted average of the straight time pay.

Now, as far as what is fair, when I was an employee, if you had tried to pay me less for driving, I would be looking for a new employer.

Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.
^^^^All of this ^^^^^


At least in my area we do not have to pay OT for drive time.
 

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Just let him take the truck home. Then you only have to pay him for the 8 hours he is on the jobsite. If you don't trust him enough to take the truck home, fire him and hire someone you trust.
 

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Most of our work is project based. With very little service or travel time during a regular work day.

Our main service areas is quite broad and mainly rural, so all the guys have some distance to travel to the Jobsite and then home again.

A number of years ago, we stopped having the guys come to the office every day in the morning/evening and now everyone basically gets themselves to the sites each day.

So,

Anyone who travels 50km or less one way should be expected to get themselves to work each day. Anyone who travels more than that is compensated for their mileage over the threshold.

We provide vehicles for the crews to get to and from work each day, fuel etc.

Anyone working on specific projects where we can bill travel time is paid travel.

Any of the guys who work service are on the clock once they hit their first job up until the truck hits their driveway at night.
 
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