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Employers: Would you hire someone that made a mistake 10 years ago?

  • Yes

    Votes: 5 83.3%
  • No

    Votes: 1 16.7%
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I don't think there is a solid answer to your question. The felony on your record would make me look really hard at all your references and prior employment.

It would also put you a step behind someone that has a clean record.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't think there is a solid answer to your question. The felony on your record would make me look really hard at all your references and prior employment.

It would also put you a step behind someone that has a clean record.
This reminds me of those two politicians running for office. One of them had a clean record and the other one had a DUI on his record. Everyone voted for the politician with the clean record although the politician with the DUI had a proven track record and a plan to create 5,000 more jobs than the politician with the clean record.
 

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You sound like someone who likes to make excuses. Man up and accept what you did. Don't blame the felony on your lawyer, you made the mistake. A prospective employer will look more highly on you if you admit you f'd up than to make a bunch of excuses.
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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Depends on the mistake. What did the prospective employee do exactly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You sound like someone who likes to make excuses.
It might seem like that. But, in the past I told people that I had been convicted of a felony and they automatically equated me to a child rapist that was let out of jail yesterday after doing 20 years in jail. From the past 10 years, I noticed that when the word "ex felon" comes out of someone's mouth, a career criminal who is in and out of jail his entire life and who rapes and murders people for a living always comes to mind. This is mostly due to ignorance (and I don't mean that in a negative way). It is just how our society has been conditioned, especially over the last 5-15 years.

Man up and accept what you did.
I believe I already have. LOL. And then some. If I didn't accept what I did, then I would assume that I would not be talking to you right now. I would be a career criminal out committing crimes and not some "dork" on the computer. But, for all sake of curiosity, tell me in your words what you think it means to "man up and accept what you did."

Don't blame the felony on your lawyer, you made the mistake.
That type of thinking implies that I should get depressed and commit suicide. Not to start an argument, but it is very interesting how hypocritical this statement is.

A prospective employer will look more highly on you if you admit you f'd up than to make a bunch of excuses.
Not quite. Perception means a lot to many different people. Years ago, if someone was in the wrong place at the wrong time, they could just pack up, and move to another city and start a fresh new life. What you (an employer) doesn't know can't hurt you. With background checks, this luxury has changed. Why would a company ask you if you have ever been convicted of a crime if it was not meant to disqualify you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
At least a felon actually accomplished something. :laughing:
Believe it or not, I actually accomplished a lot since this happened. I owned 2 construction companies, received an Associated degree was accepted to a university (1 out of 1500 who were accepted out of 4000 who applied), made the deans list every semester (top 20% of the class any given semester), passed a computer proficiency exam on the first attempt (when 80% failed on the first attempt), had straight As one semester, held 2 student organization leadership positions, placed in the top 10% of my business class, placed in the top 15% of the overall undergraduate class, volunteered for numerous community service organizations, completed 2 internships, was selected as intern of the year at one of the internships, and received a bachelors degree.
 

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Jesus Scott
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I'n happy to see you were able to bounce back.


I guess this is just a cautionary tale for those who are choosing to go down the wrong path.. It's a long path and you're probably going to be on it for the rest of your life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Depends on the mistake. What did the prospective employee do exactly?
I was at a college party 10 years ago. My cousin took a cell phone from the party to call me. Shortly after I met up with my cousin, the owner of the phone located my cousin and punched him, causing a fistfight.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Believe it or not, I actually accomplished a lot since this happened. I owned 2 construction companies, received an Associated degree was accepted to a university (1 out of 1500 who were accepted out of 4000 who applied), made the deans list every semester (top 20% of the class any given semester), passed a computer proficiency exam on the first attempt (when 80% failed on the first attempt), had straight As one semester, held 2 student organization leadership positions, placed in the top 10% of my business class, placed in the top 15% of the overall undergraduate class, volunteered for numerous community service organizations, completed 2 internships, was selected as intern of the year at one of the internships, and received a bachelors degree.
Honestly, on paper, I think you're in a tough spot.

But if you can sell yourself in person like you did in that post, I'll bet you can get some folks to listen. "Yes, I made a really bad decision, yes it was fantastically stupid, I've spent the last ten years trying to make up for it, and here's how...."
 

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Homer to Jebus
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This thread is going to go downhill fast. I suppose the next question will be "Will any employer hire me?". :no:


IBTL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'n happy to see you were able to bounce back.
<=( I wish I could say that I bounced back. I can't find a job anywhere.

I guess this is just a cautionary tale for those who are choosing to go down the wrong path..
Unfortunately, most people who choose to go down this path stay down this path. The recidivism rate is over 80% (meaning that more than 80% of people charged with a felony end up back in jail again).

It's a long path and you're probably going to be on it for the rest of your life.
Tell me about it. I filled out 700 applications. I'm nearly homeless. I can't stop thinking of killing myself, just to stop the pain.
 

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It's not like there are tens of thousands of felons in the trades. There are some jobs that you are automatically disqualified for, but there are a lot of contractors that are more concerned with what you can do now than what you did in the past.
 
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