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Hi there,
I have a customer who wants me to bid on this job. The job is outside kitchen. The building is going to 20ft x 16ft. with height of 10-12ft and counter top on all four sides. The panel is about 150ft away. I am going to dig the all distance to bring A 30 amp 240 subpanel to feed the kitchen area.
I have already estimated the job, the customer is new and I really would like to establish a good working relationship with GC. I would like to see how much would you charge to this job .



Two Flood Lights to be installed at east corner of the buliding
Fountain outlet receptacle 120 v
One outlet receptacle above fire place for Tv
One outlet under the sink for tank less hot water
One outlet for trash compactor
One outlet for freezer
One outlet for Grill ( if applicable)
Eight outlet receptacle, above counter , If applicable two out let per side
Wire in two ceiling fan with switch
Four six inch recessed lights fixture
TOTAL Estimated Cost >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


Thank you
 

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What I would charge really won't help you with your price. We live in totally different areas and have different overhead and operating expenses. Figure your costs of doing business and apply them to an hourly rate. That rate will dictate your price to do the work based on man hours and material costs.
 

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30a sub? Really?! You gotta figure 2 x 20 circuits for the countertop receptacles alone. I don't know the amperage or voltage of you on-demand water heater, but it sounds like you're cutting it VERY close.
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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Personally........the min size sub panel feeders I would install would be 60 amp circuit.....and only if it will handle the water heater.

As for my pricing...... I would be somehwere around somewhere around the 3000 to 3500 plus excavating, permits, inspections. Thats just off the top of my head for the numbers.
 

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Would 'outside kitchen' mean all w/p installs?

i don't recall ever seeing an outside kitchen

only imagine>

:whistling2::thumbup::laughing:~CS~
 

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Generally, yes. That means wp receptacles with bubble covers, though I doubt they'd be running a Showtime Grill Rotisserie in the rain.
 

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I would go bigger than a 30 amp sub panel and if you don't know what to charge then contracting May not be right for you. You could end up losing more money than you can afford.
 

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I sit down and figure out all the material it's going to take. That includes every single connector, strap, screws, bushings, trencher rental, permits, etc.. Then I add 15% - 20% because I'll probably forget something. Figuring out how much time it's going to take is the hard part. Without being there I'd say four 8 hour days would be about right. I charge $50 per hour for residential. This would easily be a $3000 - $4000 job.
 

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Why would you ask what to price your job? Some questions blow me away on here! Heck if you were closer do you you want us to come do it for you too?
Probably because pricing the work is the hardest part of going out on your own. I've done work waaaaaay too cheap and I've put some ridiculously high bids out there. It takes time and experience to learn how to price jobs accurately.
 

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I sit down and figure out all the material it's going to take. That includes every single connector, strap, screws, bushings, trencher rental, permits, etc.. Then I add 15% - 20% because I'll probably forget something. Figuring out how much time it's going to take is the hard part. Without being there I'd say four 8 hour days would be about right. I charge $50 per hour for residential. This would easily be a $3000 - $4000 job.
$50/hr. ? Eeek
 

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I sit down and figure out all the material it's going to take. That includes every single connector, strap, screws, bushings, trencher rental, permits, etc.. Then I add 15% - 20% because I'll probably forget something. Figuring out how much time it's going to take is the hard part. Without being there I'd say four 8 hour days would be about right. I charge $50 per hour for residential. This would easily be a $3000 - $4000 job.
How did you arrive at 50 an hour?
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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I sit down and figure out all the material it's going to take. That includes every single connector, strap, screws, bushings, trencher rental, permits, etc.. Then I add 15% - 20% because I'll probably forget something. Figuring out how much time it's going to take is the hard part. Without being there I'd say four 8 hour days would be about right. I charge $50 per hour for residential. This would easily be a $3000 - $4000 job.
After awhile you wont need to add in every screw and connector, you will just have a pretty good idea that any particualr job will use approx $xxx.xx of consumables like that.
I won't start the truck up for $50.00/hr but then again our per hour package for labour alone costs more than that.

You are correct in saying that learning to properly price the jobs so that you can actually get the work as well as make money off the job is the hardest part to learn.......and guess what......that formula is far from being a fixed number. It's a constantly changing and evolving thing.
 

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I'm thinking at least between $5K-$6K. Someone is building a $40K outdoor kitchen, I'm not going to give away the electrical. I would say its about 3 solid days with a few guys. Costs me $900-$1400 per day to run a crew depending on size so I would have to be at $5800 at least, maybe as high as $7600 depending on a few factors.
 

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And Ive been doing the "cheap work for GC's to get in the door". I think it actually worked but I've been raising prices recently because now I'm tired of losing money.
 

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The struggle is to hit the sweet spot. If you're low with a new GC, he will expect you to be low all the time. If you're too high, you might miss the opportunity.

There doesn't seem to be an industry norm with any of these jobs. I have seen competitive bids and they range from ridiculously low to ridiculously high. It seems to depend on how bad somebody wants the job.

The best thing to do is try to submit a fair price, not too high and not to low, and try to develop a good working relationship with the GC. GC's account for almost 100% of my business and the good ones will learn how to negotiate.
 

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Well first off, i'd be hiring a digger.....

~CS~
and an estimator.:thumbup:

I sit down and figure out all the material it's going to take. That includes every single connector, strap, screws, bushings, trencher rental, permits, etc.. Then I add 15% - 20% because I'll probably forget something. Figuring out how much time it's going to take is the hard part. Without being there I'd say four 8 hour days would be about right. I charge $50 per hour for residential. This would easily be a $3000 - $4000 job.
you need FR software.......takes all the thinking out of it.
 

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and an estimator.:thumbup:



you need FR software.......takes all the thinking out of it.
Tried it. It didn't work out. It made my prices too high and I missed out on most of the jobs I bid with it. The economy is still pretty tight here.

I have found that bidding on a time + material basis works better for me. I have a $150 minimum (plus material) or it's not worth my time and gas money. If it's more than a 2 hour project I figure it in 4 hour increments.

I also have an "a-hole charge". If the customer acts like anything more than FREE is too much, I double my labor. Convenience store owners seem to be the worst.
 
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