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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever heard of anyone being burned by a swtch exploding when simply turning on electronic florescent lighting loads due to high inrush current? I experienced this yesterday and have never heard of anything like this.
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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Nope:no: Can't say that I've ever heard of that happening.
 

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We've all seen plenty of fried switches, but fluor inrush might be a wee bit of a scarcity hangle ~CS~
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
you mean "Scare City"! Unsuspecting folks can in fact experience an explosion simply by flipping on a switch controlling electronic ballasts!
 

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So did it pop on you hangle?

are you ahhhh, goin' to scar city? :whistling2::laughing:

~CS~
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Actually it probably "popped" before, but this time it exploded and burned a mans hand. We were called to investigate and replace the switch. There was nothing loose or overloaded, only 10 fixtures on the switch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All jokes aside, this is a real danger lurking right at our finger tips. The inrush current of electronic ballasts can cause premature failure of switch contacts. Some times the switch will be burned into the on position and in some cases the switch can emit an arc plume capable of easilly burning someone.
 

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RIP 1959-2015
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All jokes aside, this is a real danger lurking right at our finger tips. The inrush current of electronic ballasts can cause premature failure of switch contacts. Some times the switch will be burned into the on position and in some cases the switch can emit an arc plume capable of easilly burning someone.
http://electricalline.com/print/4398

Electronic Ballast Inrush Current Causing Switch Failures and Injury

February 2013 – The Electrical Safety Authority (ESA) has become aware of incidents of switch failures causing injury, when existing switches were used to control luminaires retrofitted with electronic ballasts. Electronic ballasts can have inrush currents when energizing that far exceed that of magnetic ballasts, even though their load current is less. Although the duration of inrush current is very short, it can be much greater than operating or steady state current. The level of inrush current for each installation can vary significantly depending on the type and number of ballasts installed on a circuit and the circuit characteristics. This can exceed the ability of the switch to endure the inrush current. Switches, when controlling electronic ballasts, are subject to the inrush current of the ballast upon energizing. This may damage mechanical switches and contacts. This can occur even when the load current of the ballasts connected is well within the current rating of the switches.

Other switching devices such as relays, contactors and switch rated circuit breakers can also be affected. Manually operated switches are a particular concern since the user’s hands are in contact with the device.

Excessive inrush current can cause switch contacts to wear prematurely, and in some cases arcing across the switch contacts can cause an arc plume to be emitted.

Direction
The Electrical Safety Authority is informing users, contractors, installers, designers and maintenance personnel to consider the inrush current of the electronic ballasts when designing or retrofitting a fluorescent lighting system.

ESA recommends using electronic ballasts with inrush current limiting features, switching devices with zero-crossing switching features or other steps should be taken to mitigate the effects of inrush current in lighting circuits with electronic ballasts.

Click HERE [1] for PDF of Warning and photos.
 

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Nope:no: Can't say that I've ever heard of that happening.
Circuit breakers YES, light switches no, though I was an expert witness in a lawsuit where a receptacle blew up and the condo was being sued for a burnt hand and injured back. Of course the maid had another lawsuit going on at the same time against Metro Bus for a bad back for a bus accident.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Circuit breakers YES, light switches no, though I was an expert witness in a lawsuit where a receptacle blew up and the condo was being sued for a burnt hand and injured back. Of course the maid had another lawsuit going on at the same time against Metro Bus for a bad back for a bus accident.
Switch YES!!! Read the post above and do not doubt it it can burn anyone at any time no lie!!! I am dealing with this on a job right now. That warning was put out a few years ago with very little exposure leaving us all in a very precarius position!!!
 
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