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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a 20-year college student with one-and-a-half years remaining in my Electrical Engineering program.

I haven't liked it so far. In high school, bored with general education classes except for math and physics, I wasn't sure what to do until I discovered engineering overnight!

However, I haven't liked my college classes so far for the most part. Freshman year, I took pointless intro classes and humanities. Sophomore year, I took the basic low-level electrical engineering classes, which were ridiculously easy and pointless. My GPA was really high, but I had too many teachers give easy homework and suddenly give an impossible exam out of nowhere! I was really on the borderline a lot gradewise.

Junior year, I had all the introductory theoretical classes, much harder than the sophomore low-level classes. It seems that in a lot of cases, the hardest part isn't the actual material, but trying to understand the format of the tests that were given. I remember on one test that average was a 30%! The teacher was forced to scrap it but he blamed it on us.

I heard next year, the classes will focus more on applications, but the material will also be harder.

Anyways, as you can tell, I don't like theory too much. Field engineers don't have to sift through tons of paperwork, right? What would some good field engineer careers be? Also, could a master electrician be a reasonable alternative, and if so, could I become one with a bachelor's degree in EE? There are some engineering clubs in my college but they focus on intense projects, which would add more stress after a long day of classes.
 

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I am a 20-year college student with one-and-a-half years remaining in my Electrical Engineering program.

I haven't liked it so far. In high school, bored with general education classes except for math and physics, I wasn't sure what to do until I discovered engineering overnight!

However, I haven't liked my college classes so far for the most part. Freshman year, I took pointless intro classes and humanities. Sophomore year, I took the basic low-level electrical engineering classes, which were ridiculously easy and pointless. My GPA was really high, but I had too many teachers give easy homework and suddenly give an impossible exam out of nowhere! I was really on the borderline a lot gradewise.

Junior year, I had all the introductory theoretical classes, much harder than the sophomore low-level classes. It seems that in a lot of cases, the hardest part isn't the actual material, but trying to understand the format of the tests that were given. I remember on one test that average was a 30%! The teacher was forced to scrap it but he blamed it on us.

I heard next year, the classes will focus more on applications, but the material will also be harder.

Anyways, as you can tell, I don't like theory too much. Field engineers don't have to sift through tons of paperwork, right? What would some good field engineer careers be? Also, could a master electrician be a reasonable alternative, and if so, could I become one with a bachelor's degree in EE? There are some engineering clubs in my college but they focus on intense projects, which would add more stress after a long day of classes.
Just my two cents... I think you would be best served being in the "trenches" for a few years actually installing to another engineers design to essentially learn from their mistakes. I think that this would make you one helluva design electrical engineer. I wish that were a pre-requisite for any PE that seals an electrical design.

Pete
 

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I am a 20-year college student with one-and-a-half years remaining in my Electrical Engineering program.
Damn, that's a long time to go to school.



And...... doing construction work for a living sucks.

We have to spend all damn day sweating and freezing and getting dirty to make 2-3 hundred dollars. An EE can do it in under an hour by cutting, pasting and signing his name.
 

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Field engineers don't have to sift through tons of paperwork, right? What would some good field engineer careers be?

I think they have more paperwork to shift through. They are on location.
However, with more mobile devices available, and damn near an app for everything, I think the paperwork load decreased significantly in the last 15 yrs.

If you're as smart as you say, and need to be challenged, get a bs in mechanical while your at school now.
 

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I am a 20-year college student with one-and-a-half years remaining in my Electrical Engineering program.

I haven't liked it so far. In high school, bored with general education classes except for math and physics, I wasn't sure what to do until I discovered engineering overnight!

However, I haven't liked my college classes so far for the most part. Freshman year, I took pointless intro classes and humanities. Sophomore year, I took the basic low-level electrical engineering classes, which were ridiculously easy and pointless. My GPA was really high, but I had too many teachers give easy homework and suddenly give an impossible exam out of nowhere! I was really on the borderline a lot gradewise.

Junior year, I had all the introductory theoretical classes, much harder than the sophomore low-level classes. It seems that in a lot of cases, the hardest part isn't the actual material, but trying to understand the format of the tests that were given. I remember on one test that average was a 30%! The teacher was forced to scrap it but he blamed it on us.

I heard next year, the classes will focus more on applications, but the material will also be harder.

Anyways, as you can tell, I don't like theory too much. Field engineers don't have to sift through tons of paperwork, right? What would some good field engineer careers be? Also, could a master electrician be a reasonable alternative, and if so, could I become one with a bachelor's degree in EE? There are some engineering clubs in my college but they focus on intense projects, which would add more stress after a long day of classes.
Take a look at www.netaworld.org and the descriptions of test tech/engineer, if that is something that interests you I know a few places in Michigan looking to hire.
 

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I am a 20-year college student with one-and-a-half years remaining in my Electrical Engineering program.

I haven't liked it so far. In high school, bored with general education classes except for math and physics, I wasn't sure what to do until I discovered engineering overnight!

However, I haven't liked my college classes so far for the most part. Freshman year, I took pointless intro classes and humanities. Sophomore year, I took the basic low-level electrical engineering classes, which were ridiculously easy and pointless. My GPA was really high, but I had too many teachers give easy homework and suddenly give an impossible exam out of nowhere! I was really on the borderline a lot gradewise.

Junior year, I had all the introductory theoretical classes, much harder than the sophomore low-level classes. It seems that in a lot of cases, the hardest part isn't the actual material, but trying to understand the format of the tests that were given. I remember on one test that average was a 30%! The teacher was forced to scrap it but he blamed it on us.

I heard next year, the classes will focus more on applications, but the material will also be harder.

Anyways, as you can tell, I don't like theory too much. Field engineers don't have to sift through tons of paperwork, right? What would some good field engineer careers be? Also, could a master electrician be a reasonable alternative, and if so, could I become one with a bachelor's degree in EE? There are some engineering clubs in my college but they focus on intense projects, which would add more stress after a long day of classes.
Stick with it if you made it two years then you sure as hell be able to make two more.:)

To become a master Electrician you have to work at least 5 years in the field and go to school as well.

Good luck and welcome to the forum.:thumbup:
 

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Now is a good time to be finishing a degree while things are slow. Get it over with. It goes by quicker than you think. Its good to have that degree it your pocket. You won't need it to do what most of us do but it does broaden your horizons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Field Engineer

So field engineer would be my best option? How can I get more hands-on experience in the meantime? I'm taking a hands-on electricity class at my local community college this summer, is that good?
 

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Stick with it if you made it two years then you sure as hell be able to make two more.:)

To become a master Electrician you have to work at least 5 years in the field and go to school as well.

Good luck and welcome to the forum.:thumbup:
I know in NY that some of the municipalities let an electrical engineer sit for the masters exam with NO field experience!

As a side note, EE just design chit & leave it up to the electrical contractor to make it work:whistling2:
 

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Stick with it if you made it two years then you sure as hell be able to make two more.:)

To become a master Electrician you have to work at least 5 years in the field and go to school as well.

Good luck and welcome to the forum.:thumbup:
Poll time ...Chris:jester:

Which is better?

1. An EE with a Master's Licence.

2. An Licenced Master Electrician with an EE degree


I would choose #2
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Poll time ...Chris:jester:

Which is better?

1. An EE with a Master's Licence.

2. An Licenced Master Electrician with an EE degree


I would choose #2
You think it would be best to take classes in electrical technology AND engineering? That could take a lot of time though but I don't want a desk job....
 

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leventa2 said:
You think it would be best to take classes in electrical technology AND engineering? That could take a lot of time though but I don't want a desk job....
You missed his point
 

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You haven't heard the expression in college that Engineering is pre-Business . . . :eek:

Good Luck in your Studies, I hope you decide to stay with engineering.
 

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You missed his point
Of course he did, he's an engineer :jester: :laughing:

That could take a lot of time though but I don't want a desk job....
That pretty much answers your question, go field engineering. You get a mix of hands on in the field and desk/paper work.

You probably aren't going to be happy as an electrician having to start out as an apprentice as some construction electrician's coffee and parts lackey after all the years of work to earn your degree.


There are plenty of field engineering opportunities out there that will net you far, far more hands on experience then going back and doing the electrician thing will ever get you. And plenty of valuable class time too.

Opportunities with electrical equipment manufacturers like ABB, Square D, Allen Bradley, Eaton, large automation and SCADA manufacturers and contractors, electrical testing firms, large industrial contractors.
 

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Engineer hands down, get the schooling while it is there. Young minds do better sucking up knowledge.

Any fool can be an electrician (look at me) but it takes a special fool to be an engineer.:D
 

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Come on now those guys are never wrong... My friends that either were engineers or software folk might have you believe that. All kidding aside, get your degree first. Everybody gets burned out in college by that point. Much easier now than later when you have a job and a family. Only so many hours in a day. I hated the liberal arts stuff too. Stick with it, it'll be done before you know it.
 

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The best engineers I ever met had worked in the field as a tradesmen first. They had a lot of common sense that went well with the degree.
It seems that the old timers were even better. They grew up with slide rules and pencils. The only easy answers were yesterdays questions.
 
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