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Hello everyone,

I'm curious as to what sources you go to when installing a fire alarm system as an Electrician.

If you refer to Building code please leave code section and/or rule.

Thanks in advance,
 

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The prints???

If there’s none available, then use the fire alarm code book. Its like NFPA - something. That’ll tell you what’s required.
 

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Getting in contact with the technician that will come inspect the installation is often a good idea as well. They can usually tell you whether there are any local modifications or additional requirements from the AHJ as well as giving you a heads up on any specific quirks or details of the system you are installing.
 

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Getting in contact with the technician that will come inspect the installation is often a good idea as well. They can usually tell you whether there are any local modifications or additional requirements from the AHJ as well as giving you a heads up on any specific quirks or details of the system you are installing.
Even better would be to have a certified fire alarm worker running the job so the installation actually meets the ULC standards.

An electrician with a fire alarm certification can save and make you lots of money.
 

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Yeah because a big red box with “CEC” in it at the beginning of every post is so hard to see 😆😉
I think it should be a bit bigger, and flashing on/off :p

I think they also need a pop up window when you click on it ... something like this
😂
 

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I think it should be a bit bigger, and flashing on/off :p

I think they also need a pop up window when you click on it ... something like this
😂
Just like to tag @Dennis Alwon for reference as to how long it took before someone missed his new “identify the Canadian thread” experiment.
Like I said, those that didn’t notice before will still not notice now

😆😆😆
 

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Just like to tag @Dennis Alwon for reference as to how long it took before someone missed his new “identify the Canadian thread” experiment.
Like I said, those that didn’t notice before will still not notice now

😆😆😆
As they say ..... "You called it" 😆

I don't know what you were thinking @MHElectric ... YOU of all people :oops:
 
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Nobody pays attention to those stupid little things like “Canadian Bacon Identification Marks”! Ha!

We just post on whatever comes up when you hit the new button.
 

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Nobody pays attention to those stupid little things like “Canadian Bacon Identification Marks”! Ha!

We just post on whatever comes up when you hit the new button.
Take-off, eh !
 
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There is no difference in installing conduit for an FA or any other electrical device.

The difference come if you doing a Class A 4 wires, Class B 2 wires with an resistor at the end.
Or if you doing addressable devices. Which is 4 wires and a com cable.

Most people follow the prints. Once you know your system type, then add in the NEC for locations if you do not have a print.

My new home has a Edwards Class B system. The electrical inspector saw the twisted pair wire hang down and told me that I had to ground the box. Sir this is 12vdc. my fire alarm system.
Showed him my panel and he gave me the deer in the headlight look. I have never seen one of these in a residence before....
 

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Light Bender
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There is no difference in installing conduit for an FA or any other electrical device.

The difference come if you doing a Class A 4 wires, Class B 2 wires with an resistor at the end.
Or if you doing addressable devices. Which is 4 wires and a com cable.

Most people follow the prints. Once you know your system type, then add in the NEC for locations if you do not have a print.

My new home has a Edwards Class B system. The electrical inspector saw the twisted pair wire hang down and told me that I had to ground the box. Sir this is 12vdc. my fire alarm system.
Showed him my panel and he gave me the deer in the headlight look. I have never seen one of these in a residence before....
once again, This is Canadian section! @Dennis Alwon I don’t think your idea is working 😉

-The NEC does not apply here.

-Our addressable systems circuits do not have 4 wires and a com cable. (I don’t think yours do either?)

-All our fire alarm circuits must be grounded.
 

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Building code (Ontario Building Code?) Section 3.2.4 indicates what devices are required and where. CAN/ULC S-524 has the technical requirements for how to install each device type. All the building codes are free now but CAN/ULC S-524 is not. You can likely live without the CAN/ULC S-524.

Don't forget the bonding conductors, even in EMT. Keep the 2 & 4-conductor securex in the truck unless you are a fan of ripping out finished work. 3 and 5 conductor only for data circuits. For Bell / NAC circuits, #14AWG minimum, #12 is better. Always wire in-and-out, no pigtails or t-taps.

Class A on data circuits, Class B (or A) on NAC circuits. Don't forget your isolation modules. Any other questions I'd be happy to help.
 
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Light Bender
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Building code (Ontario Building Code?) Section 3.2.4 indicates what devices are required and where. CAN/ULC S-524 has the technical requirements for how to install each device type. All the building codes are free now but CAN/ULC S-524 is not. You can likely live without the CAN/ULC S-524.

Don't forget the bonding conductors, even in EMT. Keep the 2 & 4-conductor securex in the truck unless you are a fan of ripping out finished work. 3 and 5 conductor only for data circuits. For Bell / NAC circuits, #14AWG minimum, #12 is better. Always wire in-and-out, no pigtails or t-taps.

Class A on data circuits, Class B (or A) on NAC circuits. Don't forget your isolation modules. Any other questions I'd be happy to help.
CAN/ULC’s are free to view actually.

And the stuff you posted on wire sizes, bond in an EMT, and class A or B are good ideas, but not code requirements
 
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