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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Says they're UL listed. And I bet that thing doesn't even draw 1W at 120V, so we're talking milliamps of current. You could conduct that with a foil gum wrapper and still be safe.

I think it's a neat idea. Hope they sell the patent to Cooper and make a fortune.
 

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I'm not diggin it. :rolleyes: Too many variables like loose receps.

If it's function properly, it only draws a small amount but when something goes wrong, it could draw enough to burn something.




ANd, yeah....power extraction device :laughing: ..... like our alligator clips :thumbup:

UL might have listed it but, the receps aren't listed to accept power extraction devices. Listing = $$, not safety.
 

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The photocell seems unnecessary. Why not just keep it lit 24/7?
 

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RIP 1959-2015
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What type of outlets can be used with the SnapRays Guidelights?

SnapRays Guidelights are available in a range of styles and colors. The Guidelights are compatible with standard outlets that have exposed screw terminals, regardless of the manufacturer or year. SnapRays Guidelights do not work with Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) outlets that are sometimes found in bathrooms. The GFCI outlets do not have the required screw terminals.
Duplex Decor GFCI

What orientation does the SnapRays Guidelight work in?

The SnapRays Guidelight is designed to work in only one orientation. The lights are designed to be installed facing the same direction as the ground prongs on the outlet. If the ground prongs on the outlet are facing down then the Guidelight will need to be installed with the lights facing down. If the ground prongs are facing up then the Guidelight will need to be installed with the lights facing up.

Do the Guidelights turn ON and OFF?

Yes. A photosensor in the Guidelight turns it ON when the area is dark and OFF when the area is light.










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So what happens with the bathroom GFCI's?:whistling2:
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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Awesome idea. I think if those power extractors on the side of the thing have a strong enough spring the connection would likely be fine for the amount of current draw
 

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Arsholeprentice
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Is the receptacle approved for that type of connection?:rolleyes:
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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That_Dude said:
So now this brings up the whole conversation of ground up or down? :whistling2::laughing:

You read the pictures,,, ground down with trim screw vertical. It's the ONLY correct way.
It doesn't work on receptacles that were configured any other way before this new fangle thing is used.
 

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And you guys claim I am a drama queen....:rolleyes::rolleyes:

There is more drama in most of the posts in this thread than I can come up with in a year. :laughing:

Get a grip, people.

The draw on those LEDs, as BigJohn pointed out, is so low that the connection using the spring-loaded "Power Extractors" will be more than robust enough.

And I don't buy this one at all:

220/221 said:
If it's function properly, it only draws a small amount but when something goes wrong, it could draw enough to burn something.
Just based on the current draw of the LEDS, and the necessary current limiting electronics, it is VERY unlikely that any possible failure mode will do anything other than generate a tiny amount of heat.

Any fault is likely to open the flexible traces used for conducting from the spring power extractors to the electronics.

I think it's a great idea and I may order some myself. :thumbup:
 
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