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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The utility wants a guy wire because the mast of this house I'm upgrading is over 5ft from the roof. I've never actually installed one before. Looking through the specs in my code book I can find all the information about doing the guy wire, but not so much about the angle. From most photos I've seen it looks around 45 degrees.

Mast is 7ft from the roof to the top. Anyone care to chime in? :)
 

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The utility wants a guy wire because the mast of this house I'm upgrading is over 5ft from the roof. I've never actually installed one before. Looking through the specs in my code book I can find all the information about doing the guy wire, but not so much about the angle. From most photos I've seen it looks around 45 degrees.

Mast is 7ft from the roof to the top. Anyone care to chime in? :)

The angle doesn't matter all that much and as long as you have it ballparkish supporting in the middle of that 7 feet, you'll be good to go. ;)

75-316 Guys on service masts

75-316

(1) Where the distance from the upper support clamp on the service mast to the point of attachment exceeds 1.5 m, or where the span exceeds 30 m, or the weather loaded tension is known to exceed 270 kg (600 lbs), the mast shall be guyed in accordance with Specification 28.

(2) Guy wires shall

(a) be of stranded steel;

(b) have a diameter of at least 6 mm (1/4 in); and

(c) be galvanized or corrosion resistant.

And if you get a mast kit, the instructions are well laid out and are pretty simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It didn't come with any instructions, it's from the supplier too lol

Thanks for the help.

I was also looking at Spec 28 in the code, it looks like the guy wire is attached near the top.
 

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The utility wants a guy wire because the mast of this house I'm upgrading is over 5ft from the roof. I've never actually installed one before. Looking through the specs in my code book I can find all the information about doing the guy wire, but not so much about the angle. From most photos I've seen it looks around 45 degrees.

Mast is 7ft from the roof to the top. Anyone care to chime in? :)
Most utilities have a 'handbook' or similar with layouts included.
 

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Most utilities have a 'handbook' or similar with layouts included.
Here, the POCO dictates the mast requirements. They require two EMT back braces attached to the POA and 3/8" thru bolted thru framing members.

We can go up to 36" with 2" IMC and 50" with 2.5" IMC

I hate doing it because it's such a PITA to find rafters, manufacture the braces, seal the crap out of the penetration and climb thru the attic to put the nuts on.















 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It passed inspection. The home owner got a letter from the utility saying they want a taller mast (I used the existing mast because it was already a 2") and a guy wire. I read the letter and made the changes, also phoned the utility inspector to confirm that this is what he wants and his response is "that's not my jurisdiction." They sent the letter!
 

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I understand the power of the almighty AHJ, but as long as the service coming in meets the clearance requirements overhead, how can they just arbitrarily say they want it taller?
 

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Our utility (Southwest Energy Solutions) spells it out in their ESR (Electric Service Requirements). A 2" mast over 3 feet must be rigidly braced or guyed within 8 inches of the top. A 2.5" mast can be up to 41/2 feet high before bracing is required.

We use the cable brace kits from our supply house, or a rigid brace kit that comes with all the hardware and you cut and thread your own 3/4" IMC to fit. We are not allowed to use EMT flattened out like 220/221 posted, we used to but they put a stop to it.
 
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