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Hey, SWDweller, I just saw you post. I'm not phishing you, but don't know how to prove it to you. In a short while I'll have the book up on a new website and send it to the 20+ guys who have requested it so far. Perhaps you might hear some feed back from them after they get access to the book, and then decide you will be safe giving out your email.
If you have it in PDF @Dennis Alwon may be able to put it in book by members section
 

Band Member
DIYer Extrodinaire
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Has anyone else looked at the page give by the OP and thought of a phishing scam?

Give me your email and I will tell you where to down load the book. Scared me.

Your not paranoid if they really are after you.
I have a couple of email addresses that I made up just for this type of thing.
If I start getting spammed to much, I just make up another.

Very few people ever get my primary address.
 

LAElectrician
Joined
263 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
If you have it in PDF @Dennis Alwon may be able to put it in book by members section
I'm planning on selling this book later and don't want to put it in PDF format, which can be copied. Anyway, I should have it ready for Electrician Talk members to read in the next couple of days.
 

Conservitum Americum
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I would never bid a job with specifications that I knew were wrong in some way. What I would do is go to whoever is in charge of the project and let them know that there are problems with the specifications and, if it was simple, just supply the right information and bid the job with the right specifications. If there was a lot of work and redoing the plans I would suggest to the project manager that they pay me to redo the plans to make them accurate and per code. If the people running the project we鈥檙e not interested in fixing their plans, I would move on. My goal as a contractor is always to work with ethical, honest, and competent people and companies. Anyway, I appreciate your dilemma and hope things work out!
Believe me we have. On numerous occasions. We also offered the design build option but were turned down. They always said make it op on the back side with service calls and change orders. I hated this picture.

Water Boat Watercraft Vehicle Naval architecture
 

LAElectrician
Joined
263 Posts
Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Believe me we have. On numerous occasions. We also offered the design build option but were turned down. They always said make it op on the back side with service calls and change orders. I hated this picture.

View attachment 167557
Gee, This seems like a tough situation you鈥檙e in. Is this kind of way of operating the standard in the industry or is this just one contractor/company that operates like this?
 

Hackenschmidt
Joined
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Believe me we have. On numerous occasions. We also offered the design build option but were turned down. They always said make it op on the back side with service calls and change orders. I hated this picture.
Gee, This seems like a tough situation you鈥檙e in. Is this kind of way of operating the standard in the industry or is this just one contractor/company that operates like this?
A friend of mine is a freelance senior project manager and estimator and one of his customers does a lot of fire alarm work on government and military sites. They got tangled up over an issue just like the one you mention, they had something specified in the RFP that would require a product that is unobtainable short of inventing it and manufacturing it yourself. It was pretty obscure and nobody bidding on the job flagged it. Lots of things like this never even com up in construction but one of the customer's project managers reviewing the job at commissioning caught it and made a stink. My friend earned his money because some of the verbiage he puts in his proposals covered the contractor in this kind of situation.

I don't swim in that end of the pool, the big institutional, government, military, etc. jobs, but I get called in occasionally by subs on those jobs. I have seen RFPs for not that big jobs (under $50 million) with bid spec / RFP packages over a gigabyte of PDFs. Nobody admits this, but nobody actually reads every letter of those and scrutinizes every spec and every corner of every drawing, including the engineers that paste them together.

The specs have piles of cover-your-ass in them, reference every code and standard they can think of, etc. If you want to play, you better have plenty of cover-your-ass in your proposals too. If the contractor is smart and the customer's engineer is dumb, the contractor will make a bundle. If the customer is tough and the contractor is careless, the contractor can wind up bankrupt.
 

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Want to read a free book about contracting?

It鈥檚 been less than 24 hours since I first posted this, and there already seems to be a lot of racquets to read my book. Thanks for your interest! For people who want to read it, I just put up a page where you can send me your email address. This will allow me to get the book to you. Here鈥檚 the link: Million Dollar Contracting

I own a 30-person electrical contracting company in Los Angeles, in business since 1979. I'm semi-retired now, which means I maybe spend 5-10 hours per week on the business, mostly because I still enjoy interacting with my great employees. In 2020 I attained a goal I had set many years earlier - financial independence. I still get an income from my company of a few hundred thousand dollars each year, which is one of the reasons I doubt I'll ever sell the company. At this point, because of my great customers and excellent staff, it's a money-making machine, whether I work any particular day or not. So why would I want to sell it?

I鈥檝e just finished writing the first draft of a book that covers many aspects of starting, expanding, or salvaging a contracting business. Would anyone be interested in reading it? Before publishing it, I鈥檒l be happy to make it available at no charge for my Electrician Talk friends. I could put it on the internet for free for a short period of time, hoping to get any constructive feedback you wish that could help me improve the final draft.

Here are chapters of the book:

0. Should you read this book?
1. What Does a Successful Contractor Look Like?
2. Have your contracting company properly set up
3. Marketing
4. Promotion
5. Different methods of Promotion
6. Your Company Website
7. Internet Marketing
8. Sales
9. Production
10-A. Collecting the Money
10-B. Collections - Customer Collection System
10-C. Collections 鈥 Customer Honesty
10-D. Collections - Collection Rules and Tips
11. Make a Profit
12. Admin Systems
13. Hiring Employees
14. Management Tips
15. Starting or Expanding Your Business
16. The Story of How John Built a Successful Contracting Business
17. Tips for Successful Contracting
18. Salvaging Your Contracting Business
19. End Game
20. Final Word
21. Glossary
22. Other Reading

If anyone is interested in reading it, please let me know on this thread and I鈥檒l arrange for you to get the book. Thanks!
Sure!!
 

LAElectrician
Joined
263 Posts
Discussion Starter · #50 · (Edited)
Update: 3 August 2022 - I have now put my book up for reading. If you have already submitted your email address, I have now sent you the access link.

If you haven't already submitted your email address, Here鈥檚 the link: Million Dollar Contracting
 

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Want to read a free book about contracting?

Since I originally posted this, there has been a lot of racquets to read my book. Thanks for your interest! For people who want to read it, I just put up a page where you can send me your email address. This will allow me to get the book to you. Here鈥檚 the link: Million Dollar Contracting

Update: 3 August 2022 - I have now put my book up for reading. If you have already submitted your email address, I have now sent you the access link.


I own a 30-person electrical contracting company in Los Angeles, in business since 1979. I'm semi-retired now, which means I maybe spend 5-10 hours per week on the business, mostly because I still enjoy interacting with my great employees. In 2020 I attained a goal I had set many years earlier - financial independence. I still get an income from my company of a few hundred thousand dollars each year, which is one of the reasons I doubt I'll ever sell the company. At this point, because of my great customers and excellent staff, it's a money-making machine, whether I work any particular day or not. So why would I want to sell it?

I鈥檝e just finished writing the first draft of a book that covers many aspects of starting, expanding, or salvaging a contracting business. Would anyone be interested in reading it? Before publishing it, I鈥檒l be happy to make it available at no charge for my Electrician Talk friends. I could put it on the internet for free for a short period of time, hoping to get any constructive feedback you wish that could help me improve the final draft.

Here are chapters of the book:

0. Should you read this book?
1. What Does a Successful Contractor Look Like?
2. Have your contracting company properly set up
3. Marketing
4. Promotion
5. Different methods of Promotion
6. Your Company Website
7. Internet Marketing
8. Sales
9. Production
10-A. Collecting the Money
10-B. Collections - Customer Collection System
10-C. Collections 鈥 Customer Honesty
10-D. Collections - Collection Rules and Tips
11. Make a Profit
12. Admin Systems
13. Hiring Employees
14. Management Tips
15. Starting or Expanding Your Business
16. The Story of How John Built a Successful Contracting Business
17. Tips for Successful Contracting
18. Salvaging Your Contracting Business
19. End Game
20. Final Word
21. Glossary
22. Other Reading

If anyone is interested in reading it, please click here: Million Dollar Contracting
I have signed up. Thank you very much for taking the time and effort to share you knowledge, experience, and legacy you have built. I look forward to the read.
 

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I am a very slow reader. If it doesn鈥檛 have pictures, its hard for me to stay focused! Lol.

With that being said, i just finished up chapter 4 and found this to be an insanely good read. So many things in that chapter that can save you a ton of headaches.

Wish I鈥檇 read this book in 2010.
 

LAElectrician
Joined
263 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
I am a very slow reader. If it doesn鈥檛 have pictures, its hard for me to stay focused! Lol.

With that being said, i just finished up chapter 4 and found this to be an insanely good read. So many things in that chapter that can save you a ton of headaches.

Wish I鈥檇 read this book in 2010.
MH, thanks for your kind words about the book. I am happy you found some helpful information in chapter 4. I鈥檇 love to get more feedback from you as you make your way through the book, and if you have any questions along the way please don鈥檛 hesitate to ask!
 

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MH, thanks for your kind words about the book. I am happy you found some helpful information in chapter 4. I鈥檇 love to get more feedback from you as you make your way through the book, and if you have any questions along the way please don鈥檛 hesitate to ask!
Absolutely. I will continue to give feedback as I progress.
 

Registered
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MH, thanks for your kind words about the book. I am happy you found some helpful information in chapter 4. I鈥檇 love to get more feedback from you as you make your way through the book, and if you have any questions along the way please don鈥檛 hesitate to ask!
Just finished chapter 5. Ive got a question about your 10% rule.

How long will you try a new advertising strategy before you cut your losses? Some stuff takes a while to start seeing any results.
 

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Journeyman Electrician from Alberta
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I signed up. I learned a lot from one of your previous threads about your service company. You gave me the goal of starting my own company but with the focus deeper into service and further away from construction. I have a lot to learn, and clients to land, but this book will be a good read. Thanks for documenting everything in your head from decades of running a profitable business. It's a shame people can't do this anymore without people claiming "life coach" or things like that.
 

LAElectrician
Joined
263 Posts
Discussion Starter · #58 ·
I signed up. I learned a lot from one of your previous threads about your service company. You gave me the goal of starting my own company but with the focus deeper into service and further away from construction. I have a lot to learn, and clients to land, but this book will be a good read. Thanks for documenting everything in your head from decades of running a profitable business. It's a shame people can't do this anymore without people claiming "life coach" or things like that.
Thanks for your comments. I'm hope my book will be a help to you. Regarding your "life coach" comment, the funny thing is, I do occasionally do consulting with contractors, but I'm pretty sure I'm never going to call myself a life coach!
 

LAElectrician
Joined
263 Posts
Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Just finished chapter 5. Ive got a question about your 10% rule.

How long will you try a new advertising strategy before you cut your losses? Some stuff takes a while to start seeing any results.
MH, thanks for your question, which is a very good one. Before I try any new kind of advertising, I do the steps I outlined in chapter 3: Marketing, starting at the section titled The 10% Marketing Rule and continuing through to the end of the chapter. To add to that information in chapter 3, I suggest that you find other contractors who are already using a particular form of advertising and you can ask them questions like:

1. Are you happy with this kind of advertising?
2. How long have you been using this kind of advertising?
3. How long did it take to produce customers?

These answers should help you determine if this kind of advertising is right for your company. If it looks good, the next thing to ask yourself is if you can afford the cost of waiting long enough for that advertising to start producing customers. The 10% Marketing Rule is meant to be applied globally to your company's total gross income and every kind of marketing that your company does. So if each week a company's gross income is, say, $10,000 it should reserve 10%, or $1,000 for marketing. Generally, the more established a company is, the more repeat and referred customers it has. So the work resulting from these kind of customers is basically "free" marketing. That leaves all of the10% of income from these jobs to be used for other types of marketing which might initially cost 20% or 30% of the gross sales of the jobs it produces, but will eventually come down to 10% (or even lower) of the gross sales resulting from that kind of advertising.

The bottom line with new advertising is to (1) do research to determine if that kind of advertising is likely to work for your company and (2) only start that kind of advertising if you can afford to wait long enough for it to work for you.

Hope this helps.
 
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