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military medicine (I know right)
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys, basically I’m here to gather good information before getting into it.
Little about me, I’m a Corpsman spending most of my career in the Infantry and part of it in a Naval Hospital in the ED. Prior to the Military I was a volunteer firefighter, so basically I like being outside. Currently on my last deployment before I get out and when I get back I’ll get to meet my two sons.

Plan is to either attend the military sponsored lineman school as a transition out though I may not have enough time to do that so I’ll have to go to school once I’m out In early/mid 2022.

I have a strong interest in transmission or aerial (seems that one will take some years to get to from what I gather) work simply because it’s up high and outside and I like that type of stuff but I’m unopposed to really any sort of work.
My pops and uncle were lineman for bellsouth back in those days. And I have a couple buddies who work in distribution back home.

I’m pretty used to being away for long periods of time 1-10 months ish. Though I’d like to not be gone for 2+ months at a time now that I’m a dad except for natural disaster type work, I’m down to be out there til she’s all good, on the other hand I don’t mind traveling to work at all. After five years of it I’m pretty accustomed to it. Missed a Christmas or two.

Mostly drawn to this type of community of people if that makes sense. Lot of people tell me you have to be okay working outside in different environments, which is basically my entire job right now so I should be fine there.

I have a lot to learn, and trying to get some learnin’ done early. I’ll have finished my associates degree and recertified my EMT (I’m sure that one doesn’t matter) by the time I’m out as well. So hopefully I’ll be able to create a good resume and get some employment. Got some little boys to take Fishin

thanks fellas
 

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military medicine (I know right)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds like you have it all figured out.
Thanks for your service, enjoy those youngins while they're young, and good luck with your career.
Thanks man, I wouldn't say I have it all figured out now. I'm here to learn and hang out with the boys once I earn my spot.

I can only imagine how these boys are gonna be after all the trouble I gave my parents!
 

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military medicine (I know right)
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah it's really fortunate that there are programs for guys getting out, and I'm beyond excited to have a little more freedom and the opportunity to do a little better for my family and hopefully still get to drag race time to time, though I imagine for a while hobbies are gonna be put to the side.

Yessir, identical twins. Asked the wife if I could get a dog and a week later got a surprise a few months before leaving. They'll be here soon, and unfortunately I won't be there to meet them. Fortunately schedule looks clear around that time (but things change constantly) and God willing I should be able to at least facetime my family.
 

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Power distribution and controls
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Thank you for the service.
I would caution you on one thing. Line work is brutal, physically at times. A young mans profession. Getting into some formal training would be a good idea. If you get hired by a local utility you would not be traveling all that much. If you go the contractor route then line work can be a traveling show. I submit you have done your road warrior tour and deserve to be home.
The children are only young for a flash in time
 

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military medicine (I know right)
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for the service.
I would caution you on one thing. Line work is brutal, physically at times. A young mans profession. Getting into some formal training would be a good idea. If you get hired by a local utility you would not be traveling all that much. If you go the contractor route then line work can be a traveling show. I submit you have done your road warrior tour and deserve to be home.
The children are only young for a flash in time
I appreciate the advice man! Means a lot.
I hopefully should be able to handle the physical aspect of things fine. Used to having 20-100lbs on my body for miles and super used to working outside in all types of climates for a week or longer at a time. Hell in 12 hours from now I’ll be going from this hot a** tropical climate to a cooler higher altitude climate.

I just hope I’m as good at adapting to parenthood and the civilian world as I am adapting at work.

Sounds like local utility is a good gig for me, I know my friends get to go out when a natural disaster hits and that sounds like lucrative work for them. Good thing I’ve experience responding to those too!

I appreciate the advice fellas, I love to learn
 

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Hackenschmidt
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12,272 Posts
Getting into a utility company is hard to beat, around here they are all union while the utility contractors are increasingly non-union. They travel some for natural disasters - the utility companies help each other out with storm work.

In general the higher the voltage the higher the pay, most places linemen make a lot more than inside wiremen, but they do earn it. If you are OK with hazardous hard work in hard conditions and travel you're all set.

But it would be wise to plan for a transition out of that work to inside wireman or something else if you don't make it to retirement. You'd have to take a BIG pay cut for the first few years to switch from lineman to inside wireman. Line work doesn't really qualify you for anything else that makes anywhere near the same money.
 

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Residential, lite comm., Industrial
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Hey guys, basically I’m here to gather good information before getting into it.
Little about me, I’m a Corpsman spending most of my career in the Infantry and part of it in a Naval Hospital in the ED. Prior to the Military I was a volunteer firefighter, so basically I like being outside. Currently on my last deployment before I get out and when I get back I’ll get to meet my two sons.

Plan is to either attend the military sponsored lineman school as a transition out though I may not have enough time to do that so I’ll have to go to school once I’m out In early/mid 2022.

I have a strong interest in transmission or aerial (seems that one will take some years to get to from what I gather) work simply because it’s up high and outside and I like that type of stuff but I’m unopposed to really any sort of work.
My pops and uncle were lineman for bellsouth back in those days. And I have a couple buddies who work in distribution back home.

I’m pretty used to being away for long periods of time 1-10 months ish. Though I’d like to not be gone for 2+ months at a time now that I’m a dad except for natural disaster type work, I’m down to be out there til she’s all good, on the other hand I don’t mind traveling to work at all. After five years of it I’m pretty accustomed to it. Missed a Christmas or two.

Mostly drawn to this type of community of people if that makes sense. Lot of people tell me you have to be okay working outside in different environments, which is basically my entire job right now so I should be fine there.

I have a lot to learn, and trying to get some learnin’ done early. I’ll have finished my associates degree and recertified my EMT (I’m sure that one doesn’t matter) by the time I’m out as well. So hopefully I’ll be able to create a good resume and get some employment. Got some little boys to take Fishin

thanks fellas
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE !!

And best of luck in whatever you do !!
 

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Work on getting your CDL - Commercial Driver's License - and you will be one step ahead. It's a good career for young guys and pays well. And plenty of overtime for extra bucks. Good luck!
 

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Scada Supervisor
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Welcome
As you said the group of guys you work with means a lot, that is the Electrical trade.
Lineman sounds like a good fit BUT your kids are only going to be young once, take it from me.
My advice is formal training in the union and get your card. Then decide if you want to move on/up/over.
It is great seeing people want to join this field.
Thank you for your service.
Cowboy
 

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Old Grumpy Bastard
GOV/MIL contracting
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61,995 Posts
Welcome aboard @Rapture21 ! Glad to have you here brother.

If not for a Corpsman I wouldn't be here right now.

As others have said working for a local utility is better when you have kids and family. I have seven kids, worked a lot, and missed a lot with most of them. Money is important but there is more to life than money. Being able to be home and be a dad (not just a father) is the most important job you will ever have, make time to do it well.

Getting your CDL (articulated) is a huge plus.

Enjoy your ride here!
 
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I'm late to the post but make sure you get your TAPS class. I didn't get mine and learned too late that i missed some importation info. I just did a job for a retired ground pounder and he was groaning coming down the stairs. We're all just biodegradable piles of protoplasm junk. I wish you the best. Congratulations and enjoy those Oncelers- before you know it, they'll be breaking your stuff.
 
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