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Hi Guys, first time poster here with a question that most likely won't be easy to answer (or ask).

I'm one year out of school with my BSEE and now is my first time working in a big plant/industrial environment. At the moment, my supervisor intends on having me work with power systems, and while some of what I learned in school is useful it seems like A LOT of what I'll need to know is going be picked up on the job. So my main question is: what should I do/read to help me get up to speed asap? Where can I go to become familiar/aware with the equipment/devices/terms as well as best practices are related to things like installation and scoping out projects for things such as grounding a building or installing a new switchgear. If you all know of any books, links or useful websites to visit every now and then I would really appreciate it.

I don't expect that'll I'll find anything comprehensive on the subject, I expect some of this learning is really a matter of doing, but I'd really like to make this transition from school to industry as smooth as possible, any way I can.

Thanks guys! (And hopefully this is the right subforum for this question).
 

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RIP 1959-2015
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Hi Guys, first time poster here with a question that most likely won't be easy to answer (or ask).

I'm one year out of school with my BSEE and now is my first time working in a big plant/industrial environment. At the moment, my supervisor intends on having me work with power systems, and while some of what I learned in school is useful it seems like A LOT of what I'll need to know is going be picked up on the job. So my main question is: what should I do/read to help me get up to speed asap? Where can I go to become familiar/aware with the equipment/devices/terms as well as best practices are related to things like installation and scoping out projects for things such as grounding a building or installing a new switchgear. If you all know of any books, links or useful websites to visit every now and then I would really appreciate it.

I don't expect that'll I'll find anything comprehensive on the subject, I expect some of this learning is really a matter of doing, but I'd really like to make this transition from school to industry as smooth as possible, any way I can.

Thanks guys! (And hopefully this is the right subforum for this question).
Get a copy of the 2014 NEC HANDBOOK.

Get a copy of the latest American Electricians HandBook.

Go here.... http://www.mikeholt.com

And read all the free stuff and watch the videos too.

Find a good electrical course to take in your area.

And come here and read too,lots of good info here.

Welcome to the forum..:thumbup:
 

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Estwing magic
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You have a good attitude. I respect that in young people. Your best resource right now is your workplace. Listen to what your coworkers say and observe what they are doing. Don't be scared to ask questions, although a chatterbox who is asking questions all the time can become annoying. If you have a question, try to reason it out in your own mind first. That kind of mind exercise is always beneficial. If the answer doesn't come to you, certainly, ask the question.

You may think your schooling so far has not been beneficial but it put you into a technical mindset. That is valuable. In the meantime, watch how your coworkers go about their jobs and try to replicate their work practices (providing, of course, that you believe their work practices are worth replicating; you don't want to pick up bad habits).
 

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Just my thoughts...

Go look and understand the house/plant drawings, do some simple calc's on the existing larger circuits, for practice - later. If additional plant work (drawings) was later done, note the difference's as slight as it may be as to the other professional drawing that have been done.
Legends, notes, extent of content, etc.; note how and why their presenting information.

Study the existing electrical riser diagram.

Make sure to study your plant; site plan, topographic map; just depends but one or both with show your power easement, and will show other broader information.

Study the mechanical and HVAC drawing, read all the notes.
Note how some of these drawings will reference electrical work, in respects to how they call out for electrical service. EC's and EE's and owners can easy miss accounting for exact equipment requirements placed in these drawings.

Know and learn your plants safety procedures. Live it.

Understand the in-house electrical practices! Ask to be included in the morning electrical meeting or safety tool box talks if they have them. Get to know your whole department!

If your asked to be in a meeting about new construction, or even adding some equipment, even if a small plant addition. The order of the meeting usually goes by AIA Construction Spec's; which puts your work are up in Article 13 maybe 16 now. So you have to stay awake and make sure your ready to speak when called a pone and that the other trades haven't left before you get to present your pitch.

Your going to have to learn more about Building Codes. Types of Classification of or about an area, learn what make up limits inside and outside of any class area's. If there are any requirements – equipment and certain type of materials that might be required in an area.

You will learn that many workers in the plant know a lot more about how things work, be attentive to what they are saying; don't be limited or limit your search of knowledge, nor demand, this or that because you are the EE.

Some people will be silent and not amused with you or your status much less presence. I've found that treating all people the same is a better road to go. Vinegar - honey comes to mind!
Once you gain their respect you will gain their knowledge.

Just like here don't be afraid to ask!

Oh, using humor is a good intro somethimes...

Good Luck in your pursuits!
 

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CADPoint said:
Go look and understand the house/plant drawings, do some simple calc's on the existing larger circuits, for practice - later. If additional plant work (drawings) was later done, note the difference's as slight as it may be as to the other professional drawing that have been done. Legends, notes, extent of content, etc.; note how and why their presenting information. Study the existing electrical riser diagram. Make sure to study your plant; site plan, topographic map; just depends but one or both with show your power easement, and will show other broader information. Study the mechanical and HVAC drawing, read all the notes. Note how some of these drawings will reference electrical work, in respects to how they call out for electrical service. EC's and EE's and owners can easy miss accounting for exact equipment requirements placed in these drawings. Know and learn your plants safety procedures. Live it. Understand the in-house electrical practices! Ask to be included in the morning electrical meeting or safety tool box talks if they have them. Get to know your whole department! If your asked to be in a meeting about new construction, or even adding some equipment, even if a small plant addition. The order of the meeting usually goes by AIA Construction Spec's; which puts your work are up in Article 13 maybe 16 now. So you have to stay awake and make sure your ready to speak when called a pone and that the other trades haven't left before you get to present your pitch. Your going to have to learn more about Building Codes. Types of Classification of or about an area, learn what make up limits inside and outside of any class area's. If there are any requirements – equipment and certain type of materials that might be required in an area. You will learn that many workers in the plant know a lot more about how things work, be attentive to what they are saying; don't be limited or limit your search of knowledge, nor demand, this or that because you are the EE. Some people will be silent and not amused with you or your status much less presence. I've found that treating all people the same is a better road to go. Vinegar - honey comes to mind! Once you gain their respect you will gain their knowledge. Just like here don't be afraid to ask! Oh, using humor is a good intro somethimes... Good Luck in your pursuits!
What is an electrical riser?
 

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Professional Engineer (MD, VA, DC, DE) and licensed Master electrician (DE and MD)
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Hi Guys, first time poster here with a question that most likely won't be easy to answer (or ask).

I'm one year out of school with my BSEE and now is my first time working in a big plant/industrial environment. At the moment, my supervisor intends on having me work with power systems, and while some of what I learned in school is useful it seems like A LOT of what I'll need to know is going be picked up on the job. So my main question is: what should I do/read to help me get up to speed asap? quote]

You've been provided with lots of good info in the earlier posts.
I'll add one reference book to HARRY's list, and that's NFPA 70E 2012 edition.
I'll also add to CADPoint's offering - one fundamental exercise for a Power Engineer. Learn everything you can about the electrical characteristics of motors, for which there's lots to know. Be able to understand and relate all of the information on a motor nameplate to develop fla calcs based on horsepower listing to agree with the listed fla. (pf, eff)
Learn NEC 430 for the appropriate installation of motors. Understand the Time Current Characterisitc curves associated with the motor protective devices, and note how NEMA design ratings affect the TCC. Incorporate the application of VFDs into your knowledge base, and understand the NEC requirements for VFD installations.
I started much like yourself, graduating with a BSEE and entering the industrial world. Most EEs went the controls route, but I went power.
You will need to become proficient in Power System Fault, Coordination and Arc Flash Studies. Arc flash will be a popular topic for power engineers for many years to come.
Good luck with it. It's a technically challenging but very rewarding career focus in my experience, and a skill that should remain desirable and employable.
 
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