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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A combination inspector left a correction notice for a new home final inspection that included not allowing the furnace switch and receptacle outlet box to be mounted on the side of the furnace. There are no removable covers where it is mounted, and I can't seem to find anything in the code that would not allow this. I am assuming it would be in another code other than the NEC. Anybody heard this one before?
 

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acebradley said:
A combination inspector left a correction notice for a new home final inspection that included not allowing the furnace switch and receptacle outlet box to be mounted on the side of the furnace. There are no removable covers where it is mounted, and I can't seem to find anything in the code that would not allow this. I am assuming it would be in another code other than the NEC. Anybody heard this one before?
Ask for a code reference, when he won't(can't) give you one, you will have your answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wasn't my installation, but I see them like this all the time and haven't ran across an inspector failing it. I checked the 2012 ICC mechanical code and IRC and couldn't find anything. Just wondering if anyone else has had an inspector bring it up before, or might know if it is actually in another code.
 

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I'm sure Mr HI walked by the good lords biggest home disasters incarnate, to focus on minutia Ace

That is what they do

Now i'm unsure about Colorado, but in my state there is no required :censored: certification or licensure of an HI

If your situation is similar, guess what happens when you, a licensed individual, are coerced into walking by every other obvious electrical debauchery to this HI whim?

~CS~
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In Colorado, You must be a licensed JW or Master to inspect commercial. To inspect residential you need to be a licensed RW at a minimum, OR...here's the kicker...you can have a residential inspector certification and a minimum two years of experience inspecting residential jobs.

To me, this was meant as a grandfather clause or some BS in order not to ruffle the feathers of the inspectors that were already inspecting at the time the electrician's practice act passed with the current language. Somehow though, I think people are getting away with it by just saying they have the experience.

I personally think that only licensed Electricians should be considered qualified to do inspections. If you can't install it, how would you really know how to inspect it correctly? Plus, we all know as electricians that there is so much to learn in the trade on a continual basis, and even us electricians don't always agree on the interpretations of the code. I just don't see how JOE SCHMOE handy feller, even if he or she is a good tinner, carpenter, GC, etc., can possibly be an effective electrical inspector without being an electrician. There is just too much to have to know and understand that you can really only get from completing an apprenticeship and becoming a licensed electrician.
 

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I don't know if it's code, but I was taught it was wrong to affix enclosures to HVAC equipment early on, and I've personally never done it. Although, it does seem to be fairly common practice.
You've never installed a disconnect on the side of a roof top unit, or mounted a handy box on the side of a furnace? Where do you usually put them?
 

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In Colorado, You must be a licensed JW or Master to inspect commercial. To inspect residential you need to be a licensed RW at a minimum, OR...here's the kicker...you can have a residential inspector certification and a minimum two years of experience inspecting residential jobs.

To me, this was meant as a grandfather clause or some BS in order not to ruffle the feathers of the inspectors that were already inspecting at the time the electrician's practice act passed with the current language. Somehow though, I think people are getting away with it by just saying they have the experience.

I personally think that only licensed Electricians should be considered qualified to do inspections. If you can't install it, how would you really know how to inspect it correctly? Plus, we all know as electricians that there is so much to learn in the trade on a continual basis, and even us electricians don't always agree on the interpretations of the code. I just don't see how JOE SCHMOE handy feller, even if he or she is a good tinner, carpenter, GC, etc., can possibly be an effective electrical inspector without being an electrician. There is just too much to have to know and understand that you can really only get from completing an apprenticeship and becoming a licensed electrician.

At least you've some basic certs in Colorado Ace, maybe they work and maybe they don't

What we have does not, our contingent of HI's are basically owned by realtors who are about as honest as any other sales folk

Being that i've put my $.02 into their 'Home Inspections' , because i've been confronted with their 'don't ask, don't tell' policies in the past, they rarely call me anymore

I don't wish those :censored:'ers on anyone of my peers backs, which is why i've opined back to your OP in the manner i have

tread carefully

~CS~
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Agreed.

I am not aware of any regulation of home inspectors here in CO either and have seen inspection reports of some funny sheez that leaves you scratching your head.

Just for clarification, in this particular instance though, I am actually talking about building dept. inspector qualifications per the CO state standards.
 

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A combination inspector left a correction notice for a new home final inspection that included not allowing the furnace switch and receptacle outlet box to be mounted on the side of the furnace. There are no removable covers where it is mounted, and I can't seem to find anything in the code that would not allow this. I am assuming it would be in another code other than the NEC. Anybody heard this one before?



What is he Mad at you for ? Never heard that one .




Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Evidently, the IMC and the IFGC codes say that the appliance has has to have access for repair or replacement without removing permanent construction, and I guess that some inspectors around here consider having to remove the disconnect from the appliance in order to replace the appliance as removing permanent construction. The intent was to be able to disconnect the appliance from the power source via the local disconnect in order to do the work without having to remove the disconnect from it's permanent location.

I guess I can see that now, and admit it sorta makes sense. You can't really have an individual who is not licensed as an electrician removing and re-installing electrical equipment, though around here the HVAC guys are permitted to disconnect and reconnect the furnace for replacement only.
 
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