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GE RR3 Relays

14196 Views 14 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  S[piralform
I am working in a house with GE RR3 relays used in lighting circuits.
I expected these circuits to be similar to 3-Wire motor start / stop stations.
However, I found that the rocker switch, used with the relay, uses normally open, momentary contacts for both on and off. I expected a normally closed for the off function and a normally open for the on function like in a motor starter.

Does anyone have a drawing of how this is done with 2 momentary, normally open contacts?

I already have wiring diagrams for GE RRX lighting systems but nothing that shows internal wiring of the relay.

Thanks
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It is a great old system.

Basically the RR3 is a mechanically held relay, it has a common lead and open and close leads.

A pulse to on the open lead opens it and it stays open until you send a pulse on the close lead.



Go here for tons of info http://www.touchplate.com/standardSupport.php

And here as well .... http://www.gelighting.com/na/business_lighting/products/lighting_controls/pdfs/tlclvrc.pdf
Every homeowner that has it, tells me that they hate it and wish they could get rid of it.
 

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I think many people's issue with it can be summed up by the fact that they can't find anyone competent to work on it if it fails. I've seen many systems that have no reason to have been butchered up the way they have been.
 

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The RR3 relay has a center-tapped-coil which moves the armature longitudinally, depending on which end of the coil has been pulsed. The armature is attached to an over-dead-center, berillium copper spring that completes the external circuit in one position and opens it in the other. The relay can be either open or closed, depending on which end of the coil was last pulsed.

More the 40 years ago, while my house was being built, I wired it for low voltage controlled lighting, using RR3 and RR5P relays. These relays were located in several distribution boxes in convenient locations, permitting easy access to change connections between switches and relays. I also used a 24 volt dc power supply to permit the use of steering diodes to add flexibility to the system, something not possible with ac power. The only failure I've ever experienced was a relay zapped with an EMP from a nearby lightening strike. Needless to say, local electricians are impressed but confused. By the way, I was an aerospace engineer with NASA before I retired. moodybob
 

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I put them in 36 years ago building my house- They make adding lights on a circuit so much easier- Running phone wire (control and relay) rather than full voltage cable. Two 12 pos rotary switches in Kitchen and Master b'room linked to a master terminal strip in basement- makes for easy additions. Only complaint is that replacements (or additions) are pricey- Also the pilot lights tend to burn out- 24v ac 3mm.

My relays are a mix of older RR3 and subsequent later versions. (mix of same and isolated pilot )
I would like to convert to LED- Does anybody know if relays will operate on DC voltage?
 
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