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I was thinking about this yesterday:

In an attic, we had temp feeder from panel OCPD to a sub panel so we could disassemble and reconnect pipe to new panel.

The temp connection was a splice made with split bolts. The two hot feeds were tapes but grounded conductor splice was not. I tested amps and had about 4 A on it.

What would it take for me to get shocked from touching it? I avoided it, but figure there's no potential to ground so no risk of shock?

Sorry if this is an ignorant question but I need it explained
 

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I was thinking about this yesterday:

In an attic, we had temp feeder from panel OCPD to a sub panel so we could disassemble and reconnect pipe to new panel.

The temp connection was a splice made with split bolts. The two hot feeds were tapes but grounded conductor splice was not. I tested amps and had about 4 A on it.

What would it take for me to get shocked from touching it? I avoided it, but figure there's no potential to ground so no risk of shock?

Sorry if this is an ignorant question but I need it explained

Don't open that splice up and put yourself between it.
 

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If it was terminated at the main panel correctly you should have 0 volts to ground on it. It still has current through it. Draw it out.
 

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Oh okay, that makes sense. I was thinking... I know I've been shocked by neutral before but how does that happen?

An easy way to think of it is the neutral (grounded conductor) is completing the circuit.

Now if for some reason the neutral was too short you would take a short section of wire, connect it to the neutral bar and the neutral conductor thus completing the circuit and current would now be flowing on every component of the circuit.

If you were to remove the short section of wire and replace it with your body you would now have current flowing through your body and be receiving a shock during the duration of current flowing in the circuit.
 

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Its not at ground potential. As soon as load is applied to the neutral the voltage to earth goes up. This is due to the voltage drop across the wire back to the source.
So, to expand on this a tad Meadow....

The further we are down the circuit, the more this phenomenon should appear

~CS~
 

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So, to expand on this a tad Meadow....

The further we are down the circuit, the more this phenomenon should appear

~CS~
Yup. Load and wire size also play a role. The smaller the wire and/or the more current, the more voltage drop. The more voltage drop the more voltage your neutral will read to earth.
 

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Thx Meadow :thumbsup:
So we can basically reverse engineer the VD formula from the far end of a circuit, which i suspect my fancy dancy VD meter is doing for me.....:rolleyes:~CS~
 

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Thx Meadow :thumbsup:
So we can basically reverse engineer the VD formula from the far end of a circuit, which i suspect my fancy dancy VD meter is doing for me.....:rolleyes:~CS~


A High impedance meter is good at picking such stuff up.


Basically when you have voltage drop current is being restricted, so a rise in voltage takes place. That rise in voltage wants to push current along alternate paths back to the source. So if you touch the neutral while grounded some of that current will go through you.

Also the reason why current should be kept off grounding wires.
 

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Don't open that splice up and put yourself between it.

I bet everyone remembers when they found that out the hard way.


I was only a few weeks in and troubleshooting some 120V landscape lights.

I went from, "WTF" to "Duh" in about 10 seconds.:laughing:
 

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Lady calls and complains that she gets shocked doing laundry

But only when the dryer is on , and she's touching the washer or sink.......

~CS~
 

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My buddy gets hit in his stove when he touches a metal knife to the pan he's cooking on.

So I told him to wear shoes when he cooks :laughing:
 

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After reading posts I was wondering if you were talking amps, or volts on the equipment ground. You were saying amps, and others talked volts. Or, were you talking on the grounded conductor? Pretty sure you were getting 4 amps on grounded which has same potential as earth, but like the others said, don't open it..
 
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