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Watt Pusher
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After reading posts I was wondering if you were talking amps, or volts on the equipment ground. You were saying amps, and others talked volts. Or, were you talking on the grounded conductor? Pretty sure you were getting 4 amps on grounded which has same potential as earth, but like the others said, don't open it..
Where there's amps, there's volts.
 

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After reading posts I was wondering if you were talking amps, or volts on the equipment ground. You were saying amps, and others talked volts. Or, were you talking on the grounded conductor? Pretty sure you were getting 4 amps on grounded which has same potential as earth, but like the others said, don't open it..
It does not, as soon as current starts flowing (amps) you get voltage drop. because there is no such thing as a wire with zero ohms.
 

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O volts to lightning
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Oh okay, that makes sense. I was thinking... I know I've been shocked by neutral before but how does that happen?
Also, If you open the neutral splice and you measure voltage to ground on each of the two conductors, you will find one of them now has full L-N potential to ground. If you were to touch that conductor (which is the one going to the load) while you were grounded, you would receive a shock from that potential. Some say this shock is worse than a "normal" line to ground shock because of the load current.
 

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Also, If you open the neutral splice and you measure voltage to ground on each of the two conductors, you will find one of them now has full L-N potential to ground. If you were to touch that conductor (which is the one going to the load) while you were grounded, you would receive a shock from that potential. Some say this shock is worse than a "normal" line to ground shock because of the load current.

A coworker of mine just got belted N-G in a fixture.

The neutral was being shared. The switch leg was off but there was still a load back on the neutral.
 

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O volts to lightning
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That is also why handle ties are now required for multi-wire branch circuits. Shared neutrals carry current from both sources. LOTO of only the circuit you're working on, doesn't protect you from getting nailed if you open the shared neutral.
 

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If your neutral conductor is not properly bonded to the grounded conductor at the first means of disconnect. You can potentially carry the load from the entire panel back on that neutral. As the current is always looking for the path of least resistance.
 
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