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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m sure this is something most guys have experienced - Getting stuck in a certain area of our trade and wanting to see other things. Totally understandable. Totally relate able.

For me, it was doing large commercial construction for several years. Yeah, it paid the bills and fed the babies, but I’m glad I moved on to different pastures to see other stuff.

From a business outlook, it’s easy to see why people get stuck in something. If someone does a good job at a task and produces maximum results, why in the world would you want to change that? This brings in max revenue!

As a young guy, I wouldn’t have wanted that to be my life. But now I think a little differently. If your good at something, and you don’t mind doing it everyday, this is where its at. This is where you can get the most bang for your buck. The best pay and doing what you like.

After chasing something new and “different shiny things” for a decade or so, I can say that everything gets a little boring & repetitive after a while. So you might as well find something you like and pays well.
 

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For me it was troubleshooting. I would most likely still be doing that had my supervision not forced my off shift work. They me go to regular maintenance and then I had to look to leave. Out on my own I did residential, commercial, light industrial, waste water treatment and solar. By far troubleshooting is still my favorite. I now do it with crushers and water treatment stuff. But all that is winding down. I kind of like fixing all the crap that has been neglected at my place. Work a half a day a couple times a week. The rest of the time spent at home.
 

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Im stuck in a mellow industrial job working for a public utility but i really miss getting my arse kicked on a old panel with no prints with a boss screaming.

I started to look for something more challenging so they beat me with a big bag of money until i surrendered. Now im searching facebook market place buying all sorts of broken crap to work on. This week its a miller Syncrowave welder. Got it fixed this morning and was playing tig welding aluminium this afternoon. Haven't tig welded aluminum in many years so im going to play with it until im happy that i have mastered it then probably sell the welder and find something else.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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I need variety.
Me too, after a while I start getting antsy and then worse than antsy.
After chasing something new and “different shiny things” for a decade or so, I can say that everything gets a little boring & repetitive after a while.
Are we still talking about work :)
This is an excellent point, you don't want to take work based on what entertains you, it's not likely to be what makes you money.
Another thing to think about, I think it's important to get good at keeping interested in things.
Now im searching facebook market place buying all sorts of broken crap to work on.
That's smart, you don't pass up a great opportunity for a job that's more entertaining, you just find some other outlet for what the job lacks.
 

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most of my career was spent in industry on shift, trouble shooting was all there was, but it was usually interesting stuff

it just so happens that i hate boring resi new construction, and trim out is the worst part for me

however most of my work now is trouble shooting slightly older to really older houses
most of the time it is the boring poked in the back of the plug lost neutral

sometimes it gets very interesting. i had a plug in public housing that was losing the neu. while daisy chained to the next bedroom.
every time i came to look at it, it was either working or i simply couldnt find it. on the the third trip i began taking the covers off and testing both halves of the plug.
my test bulb showed good but i noticed a teeny tiny flash on the neu tab (i just happened to be facing the right direction to see it)
i killed the breaker and pulled the plug, then closely examined the tab. i saw a tiny burn mark that was across a tiny hairline crack in the tab. replaced that plug, all good.

sometimes maybe a problem like dspiffy has that is difficult to find

sometimes it is a travel trailer that the door is shocking ppl,
this was usually the result of not using a cord grip of some sort where the power cord came in to the trailer and the sharp edge or a rat cut into the cord

or travel trailer plugs etc. are not working correctly. i can tell you that their method of daisy chaining plugs is not as straight forward as you would expect.
sometimes they go around by laura's house to get there. and usually they use the all in one/no box type plugs.
which i hate and should be illegal
 

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I struggled with variety too, usually having to change employers to get something really different. An industrial first aid cert can also suddenly land you in a something new (the cert being a regulatory requirement, and specific skills/experience in the trade doesn't matter.)

If the variety you seek extends beyond the electrical trade, marine engineering has been good that way for me. Its very hands-on, whereas other power engineering jobs you're typically an operator only - bring in contractors to fix things.
 

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This is exactly me at the moment. I’ve spent most of my apprenticeship in the resi field. And the employer I work for sees that I’m really good at it and just keeps getting me to do resi. I’ve asked for other type of work none has come my way. So I’m just playing time right now I’ll be writing my test in 3 weeks. Once I have that I’m going to look for new stuff
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is exactly me at the moment. I’ve spent most of my apprenticeship in the resi field. And the employer I work for sees that I’m really good at it and just keeps getting me to do resi. I’ve asked for other type of work none has come my way. So I’m just playing time right now I’ll be writing my test in 3 weeks. Once I have that I’m going to look for new stuff
Good luck buddy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is exactly me at the moment. I’ve spent most of my apprenticeship in the resi field. And the employer I work for sees that I’m really good at it and just keeps getting me to do resi. I’ve asked for other type of work none has come my way. So I’m just playing time right now I’ll be writing my test in 3 weeks. Once I have that I’m going to look for new stuff
I’ll add this - once you get a license, it increases the opportunities that you have by 100x. No lie.

There are millions of amazing electricians who don’t necessarily have any kind of license or credentials and this is not to take away from their abilities. But when you get a license, it gives you more opportunities than the average guy will have. Interesting careers. Specialty niches. Desired jobs. Better pay. Management & estimating opportunities if you want to go that route. And then of course, the opportunity to own a business if you so desire.

I say go for it and own it! Good luck dude. Dont let anything hold you back or tell you that you cant do it.
 

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I’ve narrowed down what I want out of my career. Option one is go industrial if I can get a placement who will take me on. Option two is go get my gas an refrig ticket. While I wait to be eligible to write my masters. Than start a electrical/mechanical company. I’m only 24 so why not gain another skill set while I’m young
 

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I’ve narrowed down what I want out of my career. Option one is go industrial if I can get a placement who will take me on. Option two is go get my gas an refrig ticket. While I wait to be eligible to write my masters. Than start a electrical/mechanical company. I’m only 24 so why not gain another skill set while I’m young
Well I will chime in and say that I wish you good luck as well, but it appears you don't really need it because you have an excellent plan and understanding of what it takes to succeed. I only hope that I live to be 90 and see you posting on this site to the newbies on how to succeed. :)

If you want a well run business, don't forget to take some business courses in order to hopefully pay for your education through study vs tripping and falling. You need to decide if you want to be a small shop where the owner is hands on in the field or if you want to build a business that can operate if you are MIA (the second is the path to wealth), then act accordingly.

Best wishes and it's exciting to see you go down this path.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My ADD tends to send me down different paths because of interest, however it costs money and time to gear up, etc., to be able to be involved fully.
Thats makes 2 of us. I have always enjoyed doing different things. Like others have said, variety is the spice to life.

But it didn’t take long for me to realize when I first struck out in business that the guys who find their “thing” and stick with it are usually the successful ones. Basically it just boils down to everything is easier to keep organized that way. I saw this when I started subbing for a Lighting company and was taking back at how quick, efficient and productive his guys were.

This is one of those discussions that I can go back and forth on for hours. I enjoy doing & seeing different things but I also really enjoy being as organized and efficient as I can be with work.
 

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It comes down to a few things.
1. Do you work for money.
Even as a EC I did not work for money, I worked what I wanted.
2. Do you work for happiness.
I had it made as an employee, new truck and tools and do what I wanted and when I wanted. Then I was stupid and went to being a boss.
3. Do you work for both.
Now that I am getting close to retirement I work for both. I still get into some work but I mostly get to buy the toys not play with them.

Cowboy
 

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Professional Engineer (MD, VA, DC, DE) and licensed Master electrician (DE and MD)
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I was a plant electrical project engineer and early in my career I decided I wanted to do Power System Studies: Fault, Coordination, and then along came Arc Flash. It was a really good decision because it's a field that I really enjoy, the work is constant, and the pay is good. And I've always been a side-hustler looking for ways to makemomoney :cool::) need arc flash labels???? :sneaky:
 
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