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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day,

I am doing some wiring as a homeowner and have a question about sharing neutral lines.

I have attached a diagram for more information.

I would like to put in GFCI breakers to service the exterior outlets of my home and one kitchen outlet. As it is currently wired, the single phase 15A circuit on my panel is run to my kitchen to power one outlet, through the exterior wall to power another outlet, then run to the garage to provide power to the outlets and lights there. From the garage there is also a run of direct burial 14/2 black wire to the septic system. As it is, the circuit is overloaded and I would like to separate the load into two different circuits. The total run is ~100 ft, with ~60 being outdoors.

Proposal:
First circuit 15A GFCI/AFCI breaker -> 14/2 house wire inside -> kitchen outlet -> Exterior house outlet -> junction box -> Shared 12/3 NMWU in conduit -> Garage lights & Septic Pump
Second circuit 20A GFCI/AFCI breaker -> 12/2 house wire inside -> Junction box -> Shared 12/3 NMWU in conduit -> garage outlets.

Sharing the neutral wire across the two circuits for the outside run of 12/3 is the question I really need answered here. Since unlike a normal circuit where all neutrals are fed back to the panel bus bar, the neutrals in these two GFCI circuits are fed back to the breakers and then back to the bus bar. Will the two neutrals on the circuit being tied together for the underground run create a load return imbalance across the two breakers causing them to trip?

If so, do I need to buy two runs of direct burial wire to run through the conduit instead? Or is there another way around this issue?

 

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