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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, lets get some input on this one. :blink:Installed 3 x 2 x 2.5 device box ( 204 ml - 12.5 cu in ) , allowing 8 # 14 wires. I had ( 2 ) 14 - 2 wires in, and one GFCI. No wire connectors....only using side screw terminals. According to my calculations, its borderline.....204ml - ( RULE 12 - 2034 (3)...... depth of GFCI is 3.302cm X 82 / 2.54 = 106.6cu cm ) 204 - 106.6 = 97.4 ml. I believe ml and cm are the same....as far as I know anyway.

So I have 97.4 ml.......and 4 wires requiring space of 24.6 each ( table 22 ), which gives me 98.4. Yes I am a ml over.....however still technically over. So I say to myself, well im going to install a low profile GFCI in each outlet. And yes, they are just over an inch, so definitely give me the extra room I need. So, rough in rolls around, and I get a defect. I told the inspector I plan to install low profile GFCI. He said No. You have to size the box according to the largest GFCI. Didn't matter that I used them in the past, and planned to this time. I was there when he inspected.( I said, whatever you prefer. Went and changed them out within the hour ). Is it just me, or is this a little unreasonable? I've had a long day....so maybe a little venting here.

Then the defect says "OESC 2012 Rule 12-3034(3) - A minimum 3" deep box is required for the installation
of a ground fault circuit interrupter in order to meet the minimum box fill requirements.

Did I miss a change or something somewhere, because I have no bulletin in regards to this, and I did an electronic update in the last 2 months.

According to my code book, this rule says.....
(3) Where a box contains a device having a dimension greater than 2.54 cm between the mounting strap and back of the device, the total usable space shall be reduced by the space occupied by the device, calculated as 82 cm3 multiplied by the depth of the device in centimetres divided by 2.54 (for example, a device having a depth of 4 cm would occupy a space of 129 cm3, that is, 82 times 4 divided by 2.54).....( which is what I did above....??? )
 

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Are those dimensions a handy box? I think they make them just big enough for a gfci, I say shove em in their. But yeah, it sounds like its illegal.
 

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not in canada but ya , hes being a prick. the thinner devices do give you more room, the book just doesnt know it yet! just like the 'book' doesnt know some requirements arent available yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is there a good reason for why you needed to use such a small box?
Not really a small box, 12.5 cu in. Original plan showed this was the end of the run, so we planned for one gfci..Then receptacle was required in hallway outside, so this was easiest route to take, was to feed from here. . Only two of us on job, and up to our ass in alligators. Realistically, I could see inspector saying, I don't like the shallow GFCIs, whatever.....and no problem for next time. But don't hit me with deficiency for something like this.......
 

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So I have 97.4 ml.......and 4 wires requiring space of 24.6 each ( table 22 ), which gives me 98.4. Yes I am a ml over.....however still technically over.
I skimmed through the numbers and I'd probably agree with your 97.4 ml left over for your conductors. But don't you actually have 6 wires? 2 hot, 2 neutral and 2 bonds.

6 x 24.6ml = 147.6ml
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I skimmed through the numbers and I'd probably agree with your 97.4 ml left over for your conductors. But don't you actually have 6 wires? 2 hot, 2 neutral and 2 bonds.

6 x 24.6ml = 147.6ml
Nope. It refers to all insulated conductors. Bare grounds are not subject to that.
 

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Well I tried!
Is it just me, or is this a little unreasonable? I've had a long day....so maybe a little venting here.
Even by our calculations it's not within code.. although by 1mL, which is silly. But we all know that would be a tight fit. A bigger box is just nice all around. Win some, lose some.. I'd take that loss any day over a real issue!
 

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I experienced the same thing a couple of months ago. I had an extra capacity box, and room to spare according to the calculations, but the inspector wanted a "deep" box. Got a "warning" and had to call in to say it was fixed.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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We started using the LHTQ series. They solved the space requirements, specially when the customer decides to upgrade to dimmers.
And keeps the suspectors quiet:thumbup:
 

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I pretty much always use plastic boxes for new construction.. why use metal?

Old work I'll use either plastic or metal depending on the situation.
 

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I pretty much always use plastic boxes for new construction.. why use metal?

Old work I'll use either plastic or metal depending on the situation.
Metal is cheaper. If you're going through a lot of boxes, it makes a difference. If I were to look at the difference in cost of plastic to metal for my jobs, however, it doesn't really matter. Change orders are common and the extra capacity comes in handy sometimes.
 

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Not really a small box, 12.5 cu in. Original plan showed this was the end of the run, so we planned for one gfci..Then receptacle was required in hallway outside, so this was easiest route to take, was to feed from here. . Only two of us on job, and up to our ass in alligators. Realistically, I could see inspector saying, I don't like the shallow GFCIs, whatever.....and no problem for next time. But don't hit me with deficiency for something like this.......
I think you're taking this too personally. Clearly, from what you're saying, you're over the line and the inspector called you out on it. Change the box. End of story.
 
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