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According to the 2014 NEC we will be required to have GFCI protection for dishwashers and garbage disposals in a dwelling unit. These GFCI receptacles will need to be readily accessible. We now typically install two receptacles below the sink area for the disposal and dishwasher. I assume we can not install the Gfci receptacles below the sink area as they wouldn't be readily accessible? So, where's the next best place to install them? Dead front gfci's by the panel? Thoughts?
 

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At a IAEI code seminar last month, our inspectors stated that in the sink cabinet WAS considered "readily accessible". However, a typical receptacle with a piece of furniture in front of it, was not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
At a IAEI code seminar last month, our inspectors stated that in the sink cabinet WAS considered "readily accessible". However, a typical receptacle with a piece of furniture in front of it, was not.
Good point. I'll need to see how the state will interpret it.
 

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I would install a dead front gfci under the sink and perhaps use it as the disconnect
 
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At a IAEI code seminar last month, our inspectors stated that in the sink cabinet WAS considered "readily accessible".
That's the exact opposite of what their code Analysis of changes book says.

The purpose of a GFCI receptacle being readily accessible is to make testing as easy as possible. A GFCI buried in a kitchen sink base is, IMO, not readily accessible.
 

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That's the exact opposite of what their code Analysis of changes book says.

The purpose of a GFCI receptacle being readily accessible is to make testing as easy as possible. A GFCI buried in a kitchen sink base is, IMO, not readily accessible.
If the gfci is up high and close to the door I don't see an issue
 

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Add another gang to a box at the ctop and install a deadfront GFCI there. Problem solved.
 

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It would have to be labeled ON and OFF to serve as the disconnect. I think they are available that way but not sure.

Good Point. I used P&S

 
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That's the exact opposite of what their code Analysis of changes book says.

The purpose of a GFCI receptacle being readily accessible is to make testing as easy as possible. A GFCI buried in a kitchen sink base is, IMO, not readily accessible.
Which version of the book are you talking about? 2011 or 14? This was a 2011 Code Change class, when the requirement of readily accessible was first required. Maybe the interpretation changed over the 3 years.
 

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Which version of the book are you talking about? 2011 or 14? This was a 2011 Code Change class, when the requirement of readily accessible was first required. Maybe the interpretation changed over the 3 years.
The 2014 has changed but the 2011 states no removal of obstacles. Thus if the gfci is in the back and you have to move soaps, boxes etc to get to it then it would not be readily accesible
 

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I realize that, but I'm talking about the requirement for GFI's to be readily accessible.
I realized that so I deleted my post but you got yours in before I could finish. :)

I correctly responded above
 
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I'm just stating what was relayed as the IEAI's interpretation.

But, for argument's sake, if that is the case, then if an inspector comes in for a final kitchen inspection and there is a coffee maker in front of a GFI, the job has to be failed.

Likewise, if the dish/disposal GFI was in the sink base with nothing else in it, it would be legal. It's silly IMO.
 

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I'm just stating what was relayed as the IEAI's interpretation.

But, for argument's sake, if that is the case, then if an inspector comes in for a final kitchen inspection and there is a coffee maker in front of a GFI, the job has to be failed.

Likewise, if the dish/disposal GFI was in the sink base with nothing else in it, it would be legal. It's silly IMO.
You can call it silly as you want but ultimatly it is up to the inspector.


By the way, electrical equipment such as devices mounted above counters are already an NEC violation. 110.26 :jester:
 
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