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I just went to arc flash class and it came up under "Shock hazard analyzes" Table 130.7(C)(9)(a). That you need to use gloves when checking ANYTHING ANYWHERE over 120v. Is this correct?
Does it mean that I can troubleshoot a control circuit without them or other protection if arc flash rating is Cat 0.

Thanks
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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Table 130.7(C)(10) Still states that leather gloves are required. Anyway you look at it you have entered the Prohibited Space by touching it.
You need to follow your companies LOTO & safe working practices policy.
edit: there is an Arcflash forum, they post lots of info over there. A lot of ET members belong to that forum also.
 

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Some may disagree, but I don't read the requirements that way. There are no restricted or prohibited approach boundaries for less than 300V. All that is required is to "avoid contact". I would say that in many cases a sufficiently rated, properly used tester is adequate means of avoiding contact with energized conductors.

But like wirenuting mentioned, that only addresses the shock hazard, and there may be a totally separate flash hazard with it's own separate PPE.
 

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Our company interprets it as if I have meter in hand the hand should be gloved. 500vac gloves for most all work. They go up accordingly.
 

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Our company interprets it as if I have meter in hand the hand should be gloved. 500vac gloves for most all work. They go up accordingly.
I can see a company taking that stance, and I've heard of it happening. But does that mean if you've gotta take a reading at the receptacle in the secretary's office you glove up?
 

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The plant i work in strict ppe policy. If there is volatage period you have to have minimum class 2 ppe (10cal rubber gloves with protectors fr rate dbalaclava and arcflas shield. makes working on anything lowvaoltage a pain in the rear
 

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gesparky221 said:
We are required to use gloves on any work above 50 volts. :blink:
That's the way our rule is enforced.
 

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...If there is volatage period you have to have minimum class 2 ppe (10cal rubber gloves with protectors fr rate dbalaclava and arcflas shield....
I hate safety policies like that. So instead of figuring out where they actually have hazards and the best way to address them, the company just throws a bunch of PPE at you. It makes your job a hell of a lot harder because they wanted to make their job easier.

I've seen wording where it said "If possible to contact exposed energized parts." So it meant we had to wear gloves if testing buswork, but not if testing something like finger-safe terminals or a receptacle.
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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Big John said:
I hate safety policies like that. So instead of figuring out where they actually have hazards and the best way to address them, the company just throws a bunch of PPE at you. It makes your job a hell of a lot harder because they wanted to make their job easier. I've seen wording where it said "If possible to contact exposed energized parts." So it meant we had to wear gloves if testing buswork, but not if testing something like finger-safe terminals or a receptacle.
That's what they did here. They threw an 8 cal suit package at us and insulated tools and then told us zero energized work... Just don't turn power off to "important" items.
 

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We wear gloves ,but I've had people say if your meter leads have the stop rings that you don't need gloves and they are considered a form of protection , I wear mine anyways .
 

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My understanding is that if the meter leads have stop rings, the terminals under test and all other live parts in the equipment are "finger safe" and if you are not within the prohibited approach distance, then you don't need voltage rated gloves. In all other cases you do, and you will also have arc-flash PPE if there is an arc flash hazard.
 

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I hate safety policies like that. So instead of figuring out where they actually have hazards and the best way to address them, the company just throws a bunch of PPE at you. It makes your job a hell of a lot harder because they wanted to make their job easier.

I've seen wording where it said "If possible to contact exposed energized parts." So it meant we had to wear gloves if testing buswork, but not if testing something like finger-safe terminals or a receptacle.
Exactly, the best way to think about it is would you likely contact energized parts if someone walking past you bumped into you?

Checking an outlet? Nope
Armpit deep in a cabinet? Good chance, so glove up.
 
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