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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone

I am currently in a pre-apprenticeship training program (1 year long) and will most likely start an apprenticeship sometime next year (also considering lineman work). However, I am also looking to earn a degree in my spare time in the hope that it will improve my marketability in the future. I was looking at Construction Management and Electrical Engineering but I'm simply not sure which path would be the most versatile and "rewarding." Does anyone have any suggestions? I appreciate any input that could be given.
 

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Hello everyone

I am currently in a pre-apprenticeship training program (1 year long) and will most likely start an apprenticeship sometime next year (also considering lineman work). However, I am also looking to earn a degree in my spare time in the hope that it will improve my marketability in the future. I was looking at Construction Management and Electrical Engineering but I'm simply not sure which path would be the most versatile and "rewarding." Does anyone have any suggestions? I appreciate any input that could be given.
Electrical engineering
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Electrical engineering

This is what I was most interested in looking at. I already have most of my general credits, and am a few credits away from an EET (Electrical Engineering Technology) degree, but the straight engineering degree seems like it would benefit me more. Only downside is that it will probably take me at least 10 years to complete it.

Thanks brother
 

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This is what I was most interested in looking at. I already have most of my general credits, and am a few credits away from an EET (Electrical Engineering Technology) degree, but the straight engineering degree seems like it would benefit me more. Only downside is that it will probably take me at least 10 years to complete it.

Thanks brother
knowledge is power nobody said it was going to be ez
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Stick with your EET unless you actually want to be an engineer.

I would rather work on the technical/electronics side of things, so I guess I'd rather be on the EET side. I mainly considered engineering because of how versatile it is. The way I look at it is that you got to do what will give you the best chance of steady employment. Hence why I thought I could get a journeyman ticket and a degree lol.
 

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Knowledge and a good work ethic most likely will keep you employed.

Are you the kind of person that wants to run your own business? Are you satisfied to make a reasonable living from other people's business?

If you want to run your own business, you really should sprinkle in some business courses.

If you want to work for someone else, then are you a more happy with pushing paper or are you the kind that wants to be out in the field (most likely becoming a project manager)?

You won't go wrong taking project management courses (for either being an EE or an electrician).

A class in selling would be beneficial.

I suggest you try to figure out where you want to go so you can take the best courses for that destination.

I once had a guy work for me that was an EE. He was working on a doctorate but ran out of money and grants, so he worked for me. He really could not get the grasp of what we did, but he sure was smart.

Know yourself, pick a destination, make a plan, then execute.

Best of luck.
 

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I would rather work on the technical/electronics side of things, so I guess I'd rather be on the EET side. I mainly considered engineering because of how versatile it is. The way I look at it is that you got to do what will give you the best chance of steady employment. Hence why I thought I could get a journeyman ticket and a degree lol.
EE's design, EET's implement those designs. EE's make more starting out, but EET's have a much easier time getting hired. Though, either one is a great field to get into. Although after 5 to 10 years you can make as much or more than an EE if you are good at what you do.

EE's do more math than EET's. EE's are purely therotical and their schooling only focuses on the theory aspect of things, EETs are practical and they focus on the hands on side of things. The guy above me that mentioned the EE graduate was unable to grasp what he was teaching is not uncommon. EE's receive 0 hands on training in college. I have been in community college classes with EE graduates, because their employer wanted them to learn the hands on side of things.

If you want to be an engineer, your electrical experience is mostly wasted. You are more likely to use it as an EET than as an EE.

Finally, there is a bias against EET graduates. They think it's an easier degree or that EE's are more intelligent people which is not always the case. EET is simply more hands on, EE is 100% theory. Any EE that says they can do the job of an EET is only somewhat correct, there are things I can do that engineers wouldn't be able to do without a good bit of training. There are many things they can do I cannot do as well. I am going for my EET because I am a hands on kinda guy.

Oh, also, EET's can become engineers if they graduate from an ABET accredited college. DO NOT go for any EE or EET degree from a college that isn't accredited by them. Also, I don't care if someone graduated with their EE degree and they are working as an engineer, they are not an engineer in my eyes until they have their PE.

I have to ask, is your degree coming from a 4 year college or a 2 year college? The credits needed to get an EET degree are fairly different from an EE degree normally, and both of those are completely unrelated to CM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Knowledge and a good work ethic most likely will keep you employed.

Are you the kind of person that wants to run your own business? Are you satisfied to make a reasonable living from other people's business?

If you want to run your own business, you really should sprinkle in some business courses.

If you want to work for someone else, then are you a more happy with pushing paper or are you the kind that wants to be out in the field (most likely becoming a project manager)?

You won't go wrong taking project management courses (for either being an EE or an electrician).

A class in selling would be beneficial.

I suggest you try to figure out where you want to go so you can take the best courses for that destination.

I once had a guy work for me that was an EE. He was working on a doctorate but ran out of money and grants, so he worked for me. He really could not get the grasp of what we did, but he sure was smart.

Know yourself, pick a destination, make a plan, then execute.

Best of luck.

Thanks for all the info brother, really appreciate it. Yeah I'm not much of a business running kind of guy, but it's always a possibility in my head. I'm sure a few business courses will be in my plans though. Not totally sure on what kind of position I want to be in yet. I guess the ones with the best job security.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
EE's design, EET's implement those designs. EE's make more starting out, but EET's have a much easier time getting hired. Though, either one is a great field to get into. Although after 5 to 10 years you can make as much or more than an EE if you are good at what you do.

EE's do more math than EET's. EE's are purely therotical and their schooling only focuses on the theory aspect of things, EETs are practical and they focus on the hands on side of things. The guy above me that mentioned the EE graduate was unable to grasp what he was teaching is not uncommon. EE's receive 0 hands on training in college. I have been in community college classes with EE graduates, because their employer wanted them to learn the hands on side of things.

If you want to be an engineer, your electrical experience is mostly wasted. You are more likely to use it as an EET than as an EE.

Finally, there is a bias against EET graduates. They think it's an easier degree or that EE's are more intelligent people which is not always the case. EET is simply more hands on, EE is 100% theory. Any EE that says they can do the job of an EET is only somewhat correct, there are things I can do that engineers wouldn't be able to do without a good bit of training. There are many things they can do I cannot do as well. I am going for my EET because I am a hands on kinda guy.

Oh, also, EET's can become engineers if they graduate from an ABET accredited college. DO NOT go for any EE or EET degree from a college that isn't accredited by them. Also, I don't care if someone graduated with their EE degree and they are working as an engineer, they are not an engineer in my eyes until they have their PE.

I have to ask, is your degree coming from a 4 year college or a 2 year college? The credits needed to get an EET degree are fairly different from an EE degree normally, and both of those are completely unrelated to CM.

Same to you man, appreciate the input. I'm currently going to a CC, but it doesn't offer EET, rather I'm getting general credits out of the way. I'm looking at colleges around the area that offer it, but all I can find is ITT Tech and such, lol.

The "college" (more like a tech school) I'm currently going to is considered an "Electrician Technician" diploma, and it has many elements that include EET type education, much of it hands on. I'm more than willing to relocate to find a decent program if necessary, but as you said, I'm concerned about school credibility.

Anyway, I'm currently in CC getting general credits, but if I persue an EET, I may have to start over, which is okay to me. The more I look into it the more I realize that, IMO, EET>EE in regards to my interests.
 

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To be honest, you will become a good electrician by doing electrical work, not by going to college. If you want to be an electrician, do that. Granted, you will need the associated apprenticeship schooling, but I think college would be an unnecessary and expensive sidetrack.

Having said that, if you want to go to college for other, independent reasons, then by all means, do it.


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Same to you man, appreciate the input. I'm currently going to a CC, but it doesn't offer EET, rather I'm getting general credits out of the way. I'm looking at colleges around the area that offer it, but all I can find is ITT Tech and such, lol.

The "college" (more like a tech school) I'm currently going to is considered an "Electrician Technician" diploma, and it has many elements that include EET type education, much of it hands on. I'm more than willing to relocate to find a decent program if necessary, but as you said, I'm concerned about school credibility.

Anyway, I'm currently in CC getting general credits, but if I persue an EET, I may have to start over, which is okay to me. The more I look into it the more I realize that, IMO, EET>EE in regards to my interests.
Yea, stay away from ITT tech.

Also if you want to go for an EE or EET degree you will need to take Calculus 1,2,3, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, and one other that slipped my mind. You need to take them at your CC for two reasons. One, to make sure you can handle the EE or EET course load. Secondly, to make sure you have the math background to survive either degree. Just because an EET degree isn't as math intensive as EE doesn't mean it's easy.

Your CC degree isn't going to mean much when you go for your EET or EE degree so look for ABET accredited colleges that you can transfer to. My CC has a setup where when I graduate I can continue my degree at a 4 year university that is designed for working adults. So I will get my degree without having to move to the college, roughly 1700 a semester. That is dirt cheap for a good college.

I've spoken with a good number of electrical, mechanical, mechatronics, and controls engineers. I have also spoken with instrumentation technicians, plc programmers that have no degree and make $48 an hour, and some others. That's how I arrived at my decision. Also I do not want to spend 8-12 hours a day behind a computer screen designing a component of a new electrical system while doing high level calculus to make sure everything will work correctly, fit, and have the proper synergy.

If you are going to be an EET, go ahead and teach yourself some PLC programming. Take my word on this, you will have to learn it sooner or later for a vast majority of the jobs we are qualified to do and plc programming experience alone can get you hired.

To be honest, you will become a good electrician by doing electrical work, not by going to college. If you want to be an electrician, do that. Granted, you will need the associated apprenticeship schooling, but I think college would be an unnecessary and expensive sidetrack.

Having said that, if you want to go to college for other, independent reasons, then by all means, do it.


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I'm doing both. I am an electricians apprentice and an electromechanical technician that is going to college for his EET. I am also taking extra classes like instrumentation and PLC programming. You're right though, becoming a good electrician requires a ton of hands on experience. I don't think I will ever be as good as my father, but I do pretty well. I've enjoyed wiring screw top immersion heaters, lights, space heaters, switches, and a number of other interesting things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
To be honest, you will become a good electrician by doing electrical work, not by going to college. If you want to be an electrician, do that. Granted, you will need the associated apprenticeship schooling, but I think college would be an unnecessary and expensive sidetrack.

Having said that, if you want to go to college for other, independent reasons, then by all means, do it.


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Yeah that's the plan man. Go through an apprenticeship and eventually get the degree. May be too much at once but I'll see how it pans out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yea, stay away from ITT tech.

Also if you want to go for an EE or EET degree you will need to take Calculus 1,2,3, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, and one other that slipped my mind. You need to take them at your CC for two reasons. One, to make sure you can handle the EE or EET course load. Secondly, to make sure you have the math background to survive either degree. Just because an EET degree isn't as math intensive as EE doesn't mean it's easy.

Your CC degree isn't going to mean much when you go for your EET or EE degree so look for ABET accredited colleges that you can transfer to. My CC has a setup where when I graduate I can continue my degree at a 4 year university that is designed for working adults. So I will get my degree without having to move to the college, roughly 1700 a semester. That is dirt cheap for a good college.

I've spoken with a good number of electrical, mechanical, mechatronics, and controls engineers. I have also spoken with instrumentation technicians, plc programmers that have no degree and make $48 an hour, and some others. That's how I arrived at my decision. Also I do not want to spend 8-12 hours a day behind a computer screen designing a component of a new electrical system while doing high level calculus to make sure everything will work correctly, fit, and have the proper synergy.

If you are going to be an EET, go ahead and teach yourself some PLC programming. Take my word on this, you will have to learn it sooner or later for a vast majority of the jobs we are qualified to do and plc programming experience alone can get you hired.

Hey thanks for the response man. Yeah I'm currently learning Plc right now at school. I honestly think it's pretty easy, as it comes to me fairly natural. I'm no math wiz but I can handle calculus if the situation calls for it. I'm going to have to check out the ABET accredited programs you mentioned though. Will do tomorrow after work. I hear those programs are often pretty cheap (compared to uni at least), so that's a major sign of relief financially. You sound like you know your stuff man, appreciate it.
 

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Hey thanks for the response man. Yeah I'm currently learning Plc right now at school. I honestly think it's pretty easy, as it comes to me fairly natural. I'm no math wiz but I can handle calculus if the situation calls for it. I'm going to have to check out the ABET accredited programs you mentioned though. Will do tomorrow after work. I hear those programs are often pretty cheap (compared to uni at least), so that's a major sign of relief financially. You sound like you know your stuff man, appreciate it.
I do not make any decisions about my future without researching said decision haha.

You'll be alright, just keep at it.
 

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donate as much time as you can at your local Habitat for Humanity.Help with the electrical part if you can, learn the systematic approach to wiring a house, the methods, learn how to frame a house, learn about foundations,etc.Also you will make connections there if that might help you get a job, do this along with all the other education stuff you're doing.
 

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donate as much time as you can at your local Habitat for Humanity.Help with the electrical part if you can, learn the systematic approach to wiring a house, the methods, learn how to frame a house, learn about foundations,etc.Also you will make connections there if that might help you get a job, do this along with all the other education stuff you're doing.
That's a good idea. I might start doing that if I can ever get the time. I currently work anywhere from 45 to 60 hours a week, if I ever get a 40 hour week I am going to do that.
 
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