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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im not talking about $$$ either.

I was adding a circuit for a customer that had us install a 100A homeline about 6 months ago. I noticed that the strands of the neutral wire are starting to oxidize I think. The tips of the strands have a miniscule amount of green on them.

I probably wouldn't have even noticed but the customer pointed it out and asked if that was an issue. I really didn't know what to say as I have only seen green oxidation on old equipment and this was just a tiny bit.

Whats up with that?
 

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Happens all the time down here by the coast. The sea mist eats metal for breakfast.

Moisture the usual suspect.

Now I may be wrong on this point but I believe oxidation isn't much of a big deal on copper conductors, aluminum is the one with the oxidation problem. As far as oxidation is concerned on copper, when you tighten down the terminal it should break and allow a good connection. Aluminum on the other hand has extremely hard oxidation and the tightening of the terminal won't break through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Yes but 6 months and already a sign of oxidation developing? Does that indicate a major moisture issue?

Going back to install a ceiling fan on Monday (yay!!) but I cant pull the meter to disconnect and spread apart the entrance wires to really push duct seal around the crevices. Is a silicon caulk suitable for this task?
 

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It can happen within days or weeks here along the coast. Not a bad habit to use an inhibitor on the copper, not just the aluminum.
 

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Yes but 6 months and already a sign of oxidation developing? Does that indicate a major moisture issue?

Going back to install a ceiling fan on Monday (yay!!) but I cant pull the meter to disconnect and spread apart the entrance wires to really push duct seal around the crevices. Is a silicon caulk suitable for this task?
If there is moisture in the can and you silicone the outside you're going to trap it and possibly make the issue worse.

You should really get in there and see whats going on.

Its my 666th post. ahhhhh....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
If there is moisture in the can and you silicone the outside you're going to trap it and possibly make the issue worse.
That makes good sense, thanks.

I remember the day the panel was installed and there was very cold air barreling down that conduit and into the panel. I told my partner to plug the hole and 6 months later I see the oxidation and NO DUCT SEAL! Proof that nobody listens to me.....

So would that unsealed conduit allow enough cold into the panel during the winter (or hot in the summer) to cause what I describe in as little as 6 months? Or should I be investigating an active leak of rainwater?

also-
Is oxidation/green ever evidence of a high resistance connection or overheating?
 

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So would that unsealed conduit allow enough cold into the panel during the winter (or hot in the summer) to cause what I describe in as little as 6 months? Or should I be investigating an active leak of rainwater?

also-
Is oxidation/green ever evidence of a high resistance connection or overheating?
Sure would. Round here it gets so hot in the attic, and the AC is always, you can create a small weather pattern inside a ceiling box. The thunder usually helps the troubleshooting. :blink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwr
also-
Is oxidation/green ever evidence of a high resistance connection or overheating?



It can. Best way to identify that is with a thermometer or IR camera.
I think I need a clarification then on what is "oxidation"... I would relate high resistance/overheat with BLACK not green discoloration.

Is black from overheating considered "oxidation"?

Green as in the patina you might see on a copper water pipe or roof.
 

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Oxidation Defined
Oxidation occurs as a result of copper's exposure to air, though water --- especially salt water --- heat and acidic compounds can also induce corrosion. Oxidation adds a verdigris color (blue-green) to copper or copper carbonates like brass or bronze. This is especially true when contact with anything acidic in nature occurs (e.g. vinegar, ascetic acid).



Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_8613905_effects-oxidation-copper.html
 

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I remember the day the panel was installed and there was very cold air barreling down that conduit and into the panel. I told my partner to plug the hole and 6 months later I see the oxidation and NO DUCT SEAL! Proof that nobody listens to me.....
230.8 iirc (to lazy to look)

~CS~
 

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Yes but 6 months and already a sign of oxidation developing? Does that indicate a major moisture issue?

Going back to install a ceiling fan on Monday (yay!!) but I cant pull the meter to disconnect and spread apart the entrance wires to really push duct seal around the crevices. Is a silicon caulk suitable for this task?
make a dux seal 'worm' by rolling it in your hands, ring the conductors, slather some nolox on the noodle, and give the customer a freakin' lude if they have a problem mwr


~CS~
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
make a dux seal 'worm' by rolling it in your hands, ring the conductors, slather some nolox on the noodle, and give the customer a freakin' lude if they have a problem mwr
I wished I could hand out drugs at times. In this case some breathing techniques may be in order as I just got a voice mail asking if I could come back tomorrow (Saturday) as the homeowner 'got to thinking' and felt the green was signs he had a loose connection. So he lays that on me and I am here asking questions... I don't know what the hell to think!!

As for your suggestion to goop the thing with no-ox, I would have done so if I thought that would do any good without actually having to remove the wire from the lug and wirebrushing it in or something. Unfortunetly we don't have the authority to pull the meter to disconnect them.
 

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I wished I could hand out drugs at times. In this case some breathing techniques may be in order as I just got a voice mail asking if I could come back tomorrow (Saturday) as the homeowner 'got to thinking' and felt the green was signs he had a loose connection. So he lays that on me and I am here asking questions... I don't know what the hell to think!!

As for your suggestion to goop the thing with no-ox, I would have done so if I thought that would do any good without actually having to remove the wire from the lug and wirebrushing it in or something. Unfortunetly we don't have the authority to pull the meter to disconnect them.

mrw,

The relevant issue at hand is placating an agitated customer , reason has left the building along with Elvis


Depending on how old/wide the meter is, you might consider donning your arc fault gear, and dubbing around in it


It's all about that gleam in your customers eye , and yes , this is why i built a bar in my house next to the freakin' phone...


~C(cheers)S~
 
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