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I'll get my hands on one to try it, it shouldn't be to difficult to figure out.
I actually thought you were kidding somehow. Yes, the tool is very self-explanatory once you get it in your hands. Slide the cable in, adjust the little holding nib if need be, and just crank away on the handle. It saws off one wrap of armour, and you slide the scrap armour off. Most people call that tool a "Roto-Split", as that's one manufacturer's name for the tool. It's a real time saver, but you really need a pretty empty left side bag to tote it around on an MC job. If you keep laying it down someplace, you pretty much blew away all your efficiency gained from using the tool.
 

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I actually thought you were kidding somehow. Yes, the tool is very self-explanatory once you get it in your hands. Slide the cable in, adjust the little holding nib if need be, and just crank away on the handle. It saws off one wrap of armour, and you slide the scrap armour off. Most people call that tool a "Roto-Split", as that's one manufacturer's name for the tool. It's a real time saver, but you really need a pretty empty left side bag to tote it around on an MC job. If you keep laying it down someplace, you pretty much blew away all your efficiency gained from using the tool.
This is why I use dikes. They're always there.
 

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Roto Split

15 years ago, I had inspectors come onto my jobs in the San Francisco and want to see the actual roto split tool that was used on the job. They would red tag the job until every cut was remade.

No such thing as using dikes. They did not want to take a chance of a nicked wire and a subsequent short or fire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the heads up on what inspectors might expect/demand. I have seen two other ways of splitting BX armor, cut diagonally with hacksaw, and the "bend until pop" then split with dikes, methods. But I guess the Roto split is the best option.
 

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I own an MC splitter and use it every day @ work. It has never nicked a wire, unlike bending and cutting with dikes. It is worth its money if you do a lot of MC work.

~Matt
 

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I've had both the Greenlee and the Seatek Rotosplit. I could never get used to the Greenlee model. It is Rotosplit hands down.
They have several new models now. One of the key improvements is no need for adjustment for different cables.
 

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I was scratching my head trying to figure out how a person could nick the wire while using dikes to strip MC cable. It finally dawned on me but to be honest, that only happened while first developing technique. The key is to bend and break the corrugation gently. This will prevent the sheath from curling and will allow you to get a nice clean bite with your dikes. If the sheath does curl, you stand a greater chance at digging into the conductors.

No, my nicking issues usually occur when using snap connectors where you have to carefully thread the your free conductors past the sharp metal used to clamp the connector onto the cable sheath. Stranded wire is particulary troublesome.
 
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