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Hello, I'm new to this forum(duh). I would like to start out with saying I've traveled around doing electrical work since July, 2005. I've helped my father, who is an electrician, and my uncle, whom is also an electrician, since I was a little boy. I love the work. I can't get enough of it and I'm so glad I stuck through the thick and thin. I've recently moved to a new place of living and am seeking to settle down in Utah for a little while. I've come here to find a few answers and to take some smack from since I've not been employed for almost a month.
 

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ようこそ。
Wilkommen.
Bienvenidos.
Welcome.

Utah huh? no thanks. (not that DC is better by any stretch.) There's quite a few people from Utah on this board though so you are in good company.
 

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Believe me, I'd rather be back home in Alabama. I would be extremely happy to reside back there. I had a job and people wanted me to work there because I do good work. I can see my work from my house.
 

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Not that it's any of my business but since you put it that way, i gotta ask, if you'd rather be in Alabam, and you just moved to Utah, What gives? You had work there, and apparently a good reputation. Are you there for the skiing? I've heard the slopes there are amazing.
 

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Well I promised my girl friend I would move there. It was a poor choice but I figured I'd be able to find a job. Made a nice resume and cover page, and have even had a few places want to hire me until they asked the only question that matters in Utah "Are you currently licensed?"

To my misfortune I am not, and when I propose the question of how to, they all sadly have the same answer, "I don't know."
 

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that sucks. While you're looking for a job, get the first job you can find, even if it's not electrical, just to keep that guac in your pocket. You can do it man.
 

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Dr. Sparky, i can't help but notice that your signature bears striking resemblence to the first noble truth.
So you are living it there buddha?

1. The nature of suffering: Birth, aging, illness and death are suffering, as is attachment and aversion.
 

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MileHiWire,
Am i living "it" ? I assume you mean to ask if i am living the buddhist way, here in DC. My answer? I'm doing my best. Moment to moment is all you have to work with, so you have to be willing to recognize that you can't be perfectly commited all the time, and sometimes you get distracted, and sometimes you lose hope (faith in the practice) and sometimes you lose the patience it requires to view the world in the way it is revealed to you through the Dhamma....
Or did you mean, am i living the first noble truth? The answer to that question is an emphatic yes. I sure as hell ain't getting any younger:laughing:
At this moment i am free of disease, and free of most mental attachments and i have the advantage of having realised and understood the first noble truth. I'll let you in on a little secret that took me years to understand. I have been practicing this thing for...over ten years now....The first noble truth is actually indicative of something completely different than what it first seems, as one would imagine about a buddhist concept;).
It's as simple as this "no pain, no gain." If in existence, we never aged, nor felt pain, or sickness, and if never the value of life was a concern of ours, we wouldn't have the inclination nor the means to understand why we should seek out a higher path. It is by suffering that we are called to action sometimes. We have to learn the lessons the hard way over and over again sometimes...So in this respect, it's important not to view the first noble truth as doom and gloom.
And with that i will refrain from preaching any more. A lot of people take offense to matters of.."religious" things, and if someone is offened i offer my sincere apologies, truly. Believe me when i say evangelism is not my interest.
 

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To be offended is a choice. No man was born into the world being offended of something. We choose to be offended. Often times we are offended because of our own ignorance.
 

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Forgot my manners there Justin and wish you all the best. I will be sinking tires and hooves in your state shortly.

Being Buddhist is tough to explain to people raised in western culture and religion.
 

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Riveter,
I suppose that in the way that most people view the word itself, Buddhism (Buddhaism) is not a religion in the classical sense of attributing a cosmogenesis to a creator being, praying to other powers outside of oneself for divine assistance/favor, and the concepts of heaven or hell for the afterlife....All of this is basically absent from the truest form of Buddhism. For some cultures in this world though, the initial buddhist doctrine was construed and the buddha became deified, and the whole business of religion as man devises carried on for Buddhism as well. HOWEVER, i would say that the majority of practicioners would prefer to call it a 'way' rather than a philosophy, or religion. The buddha himself spoke at length about the danger of getting caught up in words, and caught in concepts and ideas about any one thing in particular. Specifically the buddha himself. It was said in a discourse given by the third or sixth patriarch ( i can't remember which) that if in meditating you meet the buddha, kill the buddha. Meaning of course, that if in your meditation you get caught up even in the sight, the idea, or anything, of even the buddha himself, it is an inhibition to your practice of abiding in non-attachment. So....in this way.....it is certainly not a religion...and a philosophy? i don't know....I think you have to be a philosopher to decide what is and is not philosophy. ;)
 

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It's as simple as this "no pain, no gain." If in existence, we never aged, nor felt pain, or sickness, and if never the value of life was a concern of ours, we wouldn't have the inclination nor the means to understand why we should seek out a higher path. It is by suffering that we are called to action sometimes. We have to learn the lessons the hard way over and over again sometimes...So in this respect, it's important not to view the first noble truth as doom and gloom.
"Aversion"........ As Buddhist you understand.
 
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