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If my understanding is correct, the NEC has relaxed the rule regarding grounded conductors in a light switch box.

As of 2014, only one switch box is required to contain a grounded conductor in a multi-switching application. Is this right?
 

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They changed it so if the raceway is sufficient that you can add a neutral later or add a cable without damaging the building structure, you don't have to run a neutral to it
 

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The big relaxation is the fact that the section now mostly applies to habitable rooms and commercial occupancies, for the most part, do not have habitable rooms.
 

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They have relaxed the rules a bit as Don mentioned and the entire section has been re worded for the most part

(C) Switches Controlling Lighting Loads. The grounded circuit conductor for the controlled lighting circuit shall be provided at the location where switches control lighting loads that are supplied by a grounded general-purpose branch circuit for other than the following:
(1) Where conductors enter the box enclosing the switch through a raceway, provided that the raceway is large enough for all contained conductors, including a grounded conductor
(2) Where the box enclosing the switch is accessible for the installation of an additional or replacement cable without removing finish materials
(3) Where snap switches with integral enclosures comply with 300.15(E)
(4) Where a switch does not serve a habitable room or bathroom
(5) Where multiple switch locations control the same lighting load such that the entire floor area of the room or space is visible from the single or combined switch locations
(6) Where lighting in the area is controlled by automatic means
(7) Where a switch controls a receptacle load
 

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ElectricJoeNJ said:
(2)  Cable assemblies for switches controlling lighting loads enter the box through a framing cavity that is open at the top or bottom on the SAME FLOOR LEVEL , or through a wall, floor, or ceiling that is unfinished on one side. An attic above and crawl below are not on the same floor level.
I guess you saw it
 
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