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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering what you fellow contractors did to drum business when you guys were starting off. This is my first year solely on my own and brainstorming on how to gain more business.thanks again for the advice.
 

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RIP 1959-2015
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I was wondering what you fellow contractors did to drum business when you guys were starting off. This is my first year solely on my own and brainstorming on how to gain more business.thanks again for the advice.

Get tons of business cards out there,You should be handing them out everyday to everyone you talk to.

Stay away from GC's because they will break you before you can get established .

Save up as much as you can and get a good website built.

This guy does great work check it out.
https://www.contractorrevolutionmedia.com/home.html

Don't sit in your office all day get out there with a stack of cards and flyers.

Did I say Don't work for GC's?:whistling2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry about that, meant "not trying to work for gc's.". Built a dunkin donuts and the gc tried screwing me.good thing I had a lawyer scare him a bit.
 

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If you can handle the big jobs with a GC go after them! The real money is made in contracting, and changes on the big jobs so don't get distracted by the T&M guys here. Don't get me wrong they make good money too, but it takes more overhead to run a service company than a contracting company. Margins are lower, but total profit is higher in big projects. Stay away from 5-25k jobs cause every electrician with a 6 foot ladder and a station wagon can bid on that work, concentrate in higher value work that others can't bid on. JMO.
 

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service calls for fat pockets

Yes a regular project can be only as good as the person yielding to it with you to the owners... but

service calls from penny paper ads and cards and just asking for utility bills generates leads 'cause they either say they are in a contract or interested in improving and then you talk your plan "A" into :

What is needed repaired now/ Can I show you my truck, or work on that today for ya?

-that has worked well cold door knocking for many small service calls and fatter pockets.
 

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Pool Shark
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I was wondering what you fellow contractors did to drum business when you guys were starting off. This is my first year solely on my own and brainstorming on how to gain more business.thanks again for the advice.
Word of mouth spreads like wild fire. Don't pay to advertize yourself, rather let your customers advertise your business for free.
 

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Estwing magic
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Not sure which is worse, working for GC's or not working for anyone.
Our best customers are GC's. We have seven jobs booked with GC's right now. One pays within two weeks, one pays immediately upon completion, rough-in and finishing.

To tell someone to stay away from GC's is total crap. A good, established GC can give you good, ongoing business.

There are bottom feeders everywhere. It is not limited to GC's.

Of course, this GC discussion is so very old and tired on this site :( .
 

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Estwing magic
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If you can handle the big jobs with a GC go after them! The real money is made in contracting, and changes on the big jobs so don't get distracted by the T&M guys here. Don't get me wrong they make good money too, but it takes more overhead to run a service company than a contracting company. Margins are lower, but total profit is higher in big projects. Stay away from 5-25k jobs cause every electrician with a 6 foot ladder and a station wagon can bid on that work, concentrate in higher value work that others can't bid on. JMO.
Actually, small jobs with big GC's can be good work too. We just bid one for $10k to a guy who normally does multimillion dollar jobs and they were very happy that someone actually bid it :) .
 

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Put small add(cost effective) in neighborhood paper no more than 50-60 per month .
Advertise resi and commercial.Stay away from phone books .Call on commercial businesses u know if even to say hello and introduce yourself .Craiglist is free put a small add.Some info on bid websites is free.Free and cheap is the key.Network anywhere you can with other trades.
 

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Small Potatoes
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You can make money in any market segment in this trade.

Everyone has opinions as to who and what segment of the industry they advise to work in, including me, but it doesn't mean you can't make money if you choose one that I or anyone else wouldn't be interested in, or had a bad experience in.

There are companies both small, medium and large making money in every segment of our trade.

These companies that are making money have one thing common. They completely understand the importance of the business side of things.

If you or your partner or a trusted employee don't understand the business side your odds of success are terrible and in all likelihood you will fail.

Who and how the business side is to be set up needs to be addressed in a business plan. From that plan a first year budget needs to be completed.

1. Finance (accounting)
2. Sales & Marketing
3. Operations
4. Human Resources

Keep this in mind. In this industry, whatever segment you choose to do, operates on very small margins (profits). Pennies on the dollar. The best of the best, well established, we'll run companies might see 10% at the end of the year.

The average is 3%! Three cents on the dollar! It doesn't take much to erode the 3 cents with not knowing your numbers, collections problems, mismanagement and inefficiency.
 
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