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Through bolts are for much heavier loads. A 100# piece of equipment is nothing. If you have four bolts, that's 25# per bolt. (Although I always size it so that any one bolt could bear the whole load - anything worth building is worth overbuilding. But the 100# is in shear, not tension (not pulling out of the wall). The shear strength on say a 1/4" bolt is way over 100#. A single 1/4" toggler could handle the whole load.

View attachment 155209
We only use those for drywall.
I would not consider those unless we were sandwiching drywall, furring strips to the wall
 

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We usually end up using several different kinds. Where a Toggle bolt won't work, A Tapcon. or anchor might work better. The bracket on the back is likely engineered so as most of the weight is pushing straight down very little weight pulling outwards.
 

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If it is really cinders, you probably should go through the wall and use all thread and 2 plates to hold the equipment.
I was going to question that also. Many people mix up cinder blocks with cement blocks. My grandfather built our shop back in 1932 and the walls are cinder block. Very soft and crumbles easy but strong for verticle walls.
 

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Most important of any system is the drill you use.
Correct type & diameter and you'll have as good of results as the engineers in the companies that make the products.
I only use hex head tapcons.
Just don't trust torque on the phillips head.
 

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For 100 lbs I would consider tapcons.
The shear value is tremendous.
Since you can put as many as you want, withdrawl is not a concern.
It's quick.
Yeah. You just need to make sure you get the tapcons with threads all the way to the bolt head if it’s a hollow block or it won’t grab. Sometimes they have a long collar.


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We only use those for drywall.
I would not consider those unless we were sandwiching drywall, furring strips to the wall
For furring strips or that kind of thing I'd use tapcons or nail-ins so you can drill right through the material.

I look at it as three main ways to attach to masonry. There are anchors that give you a hole for a bolt (toggles, dropins, lag shields), anchors that give you a stud (wedges, sleeves) and fasteners that drill right through the material in place (tapcons, nailins).

For mounting something like this, tapcon / nailin type are easiest to use, but if you ever have to remove and replace the plate, they aren't full strength when you replace them. I never really liked the blue tapcons but I do like the bigger silver ones that look like a lag screw for concrete.

Snaptoggles or dropins are just about as easy, and no problem removing and replacing the plate or equipment. The old fashioned toggles are a bit of a pain in the ass for a plate like this, and a huge pain in the ass with heavy awkward things that attach directly to the wall, plus they are weaker, I just don't really use them. If you look at the performance data the snaptoggles look about 2/3 as strong as dropins in block, but they tolerate an imperfect hole better so in real life it's closer. But in most cases both are more than strong enough.

Stud type can be a little more difficult to maneuver heavy awkward things onto. If you get a little cockeyed it can be a lot more difficult. The stud sticks up a little further, which can occasionally be a problem - with strut for example, you might not be able to get a strut nut over that spot. And if you have to move the equipment an inch, it's more trouble to deal with the studs left behind in the wrong place.

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Here is another option. Use 2 pieces of vertical strut behind the plate. Either the same dimensions as the plate or from the top of the plate to the floor. Mount the plate with 3/8 spring nuts to the strut. The strut will give you more anchor location options.


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I think the shear off all of the fasteners mentioned are adequate for a 100# load spread across 4 anchors.

The pull out is probably adequate also.

It's only 100 pounds spread out on 4 anchors.

If I was using a tapcon, I think I would drill the hole on a slight downward angle so that if the unit was trying to pull the anchors out, it would not be a straight pull on the screw and hole it is in. Theory being you will be using the tensile as well as the shear strengths of the screw to prevent it (I hope that makes sense).
 

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We use sleeve anchors on CMU walls just due to the fact they will set very well in either a solid or hollow section. Way back before tapcons were popular, everyone had a hollow wall set that we used for tamp ins
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Hilti has several fastening that will hold that Weight
I used there system that had a sieve which you filled with their compound and set threaded studs in it


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We use sleeve anchors on CMU walls just due to the fact they will set very well in either a solid or hollow section. Way back before tapcons were popular, everyone had a hollow wall set that we used for tamp ins
View attachment 155217

View attachment 155218
I have to check out what the first picture is but the lead caulk anchors are not allowed in many applications or specifications. Lead melts and is treated as a hazardous material.
 

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I agree with the guy pointing out that it's 100lbs sheer weight not pullout weight. You could just drill 2-3/16 holes in the wall and pound 20p nails into the brick and it would hold 100lbs no problem. I think any anchor / tapcon would be fine.
 

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As long as the block wall is filled with concrete and not hollow those sleeve anchors work really well. If the wall is hollow I use the Hiliti Toggler bolts (1/4"). I would normally use 3/8" x 2 1/4" for sleeve anchors as well.
I agree with MotoGP1199 and also add to shoot for the mortar joints if possible. If it were mine, I'd fasten strut to the wall, double the height (preferrably run the strut all the way to the ground) for verticle application (best), or 2x width for horizontal application. Then I'd bolt the equipment to the strut, using security bolts.
 

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I have to check out what the first picture is but the lead caulk anchors are not allowed in many applications or specifications. Lead melts and is treated as a hazardous material.
Two votes against using lead anchors, which are excellent for holding up plywood signs because there are no cantilever forces,
 

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I need to hang a 100-lb piece of electronic equipment on the exterior of a cinder block wall. The equipment comes with a solid steel bracket plate that mounts to the wall, and then the equipment hangs on that, essentially. The plate has four holes in it, and kit came with 6 anchors (pic attached) that I believe to be stainless steel 5/16-in expansion sleeve anchors (or whatever they're exactly called), with a 1.5-in sleeve. The instructions say "install the six anchors."
I don't ordinarily handle this kind of problem, so I'm thinking conservative. My experience with anchors of this type (drop-in, etc) has not been great, and those were situations where gravity was working for me, not against me. It's about $5k of hardware, and I don't want it to fall off.
I've asked around a bit, and suggestions I've heard are "masonry-type molly bolts" and possibly a threaded rod through the block to the inside, with strut or fender washers on the inside. I would appreciate input from people who have actually done this sort of thing before. THANKS.

View attachment 155206
 

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I have used 3/8 tapcon style in stainless for outdoor holding 300lb control panel on a block wall with no issues.just have to be careful when you drill hole go slow and don't force it.. The general blue color ones do not last outdoors.
 

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I used to hang TVs in hospitals back when they were pretty heavy. If the cinder block is hollow it would be better putting a threaded rod through the wall with a plate on the other side. In fact some of the hospitals required that.
 

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I need to hang a 100-lb piece of electronic equipment on the exterior of a cinder block wall. The equipment comes with a solid steel bracket plate that mounts to the wall, and then the equipment hangs on that, essentially. The plate has four holes in it, and kit came with 6 anchors (pic attached) that I believe to be stainless steel 5/16-in expansion sleeve anchors (or whatever they're exactly called), with a 1.5-in sleeve. The instructions say "install the six anchors."
I don't ordinarily handle this kind of problem, so I'm thinking conservative. My experience with anchors of this type (drop-in, etc) has not been great, and those were situations where gravity was working for me, not against me. It's about $5k of hardware, and I don't want it to fall off.
I've asked around a bit, and suggestions I've heard are "masonry-type molly bolts" and possibly a threaded rod through the block to the inside, with strut or fender washers on the inside. I would appreciate input from people who have actually done this sort of thing before. THANKS.

View attachment 155206
I need to hang a 100-lb piece of electronic equipment on the exterior of a cinder block wall. The equipment comes with a solid steel bracket plate that mounts to the wall, and then the equipment hangs on that, essentially. The plate has four holes in it, and kit came with 6 anchors (pic attached) that I believe to be stainless steel 5/16-in expansion sleeve anchors (or whatever they're exactly called), with a 1.5-in sleeve. The instructions say "install the six anchors."
I don't ordinarily handle this kind of problem, so I'm thinking conservative. My experience with anchors of this type (drop-in, etc) has not been great, and those were situations where gravity was working for me, not against me. It's about $5k of hardware, and I don't want it to fall off.
I've asked around a bit, and suggestions I've heard are "masonry-type molly bolts" and possibly a threaded rod through the block to the inside, with strut or fender washers on the inside. I would appreciate input from people who have actually done this sort of thing before. THANKS.

View attachment 155206
 

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I need to hang a 100-lb piece of electronic equipment on the exterior of a cinder block wall. The equipment comes with a solid steel bracket plate that mounts to the wall, and then the equipment hangs on that, essentially. The plate has four holes in it, and kit came with 6 anchors (pic attached) that I believe to be stainless steel 5/16-in expansion sleeve anchors (or whatever they're exactly called), with a 1.5-in sleeve. The instructions say "install the six anchors."
I don't ordinarily handle this kind of problem, so I'm thinking conservative. My experience with anchors of this type (drop-in, etc) has not been great, and those were situations where gravity was working for me, not against me. It's about $5k of hardware, and I don't want it to fall off.
I've asked around a bit, and suggestions I've heard are "masonry-type molly bolts" and possibly a threaded rod through the block to the inside, with strut or fender washers on the inside. I would appreciate input from people who have actually done this sort of thing before. THANKS.

View attachment 155206
I am a retired electrician. 39 yrs in the trade. If you want that piece of equipment to stay up I recommend the threaded rod. Even if the concrete block is filled with concrete putting tapcons which I don't recommend or other bolts might become lose with vibration. If you don['t want to bolt thru I suggest unistrut channel with 1/2" wall sets and then your bracket.
 
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