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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks, great to meet you, first post:)

So I recently moved to Canada from the UK and part of the process was challenging for a red seal qualification to allow me to work.
Having reviewed the job descriptions I challenged the 7242(industrial) instead of the 7241(construction) as I felt it was closer to my experience, although i fulfilled the requirements for both. Now having done more research I am very worried that I have made a mistake.
The 7242 in my province is a voluntary trade, which from what I am reading means that it isnt legally required, meaning that in theory anybody off the street with a little know how could do it, also 7421 electricians can work anywhere which doesnt apply for 7242.
All in all it seems like I have taken a 'lesser' qualification. Are there any advantages to being an industrial electrician? Is it worth a couple of years as an apprentice to get the 7241?
 

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If you feel comfortable just challenge the construction electrician too. The apprenticeship board would be able to guide you in the right direction as well.
 

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Hi folks, great to meet you, first post:)

So I recently moved to Canada from the UK and part of the process was challenging for a red seal qualification to allow me to work.
Having reviewed the job descriptions I challenged the 7242(industrial) instead of the 7241(construction) as I felt it was closer to my experience, although i fulfilled the requirements for both. Now having done more research I am very worried that I have made a mistake.
The 7242 in my province is a voluntary trade, which from what I am reading means that it isnt legally required, meaning that in theory anybody off the street with a little know how could do it, also 7421 electricians can work anywhere which doesnt apply for 7242.
All in all it seems like I have taken a 'lesser' qualification. Are there any advantages to being an industrial electrician? Is it worth a couple of years as an apprentice to get the 7241?
Not being from BC, my input is more of a question in timing.
You state you have the ability to challange either one so why not challange the industrial level, pass, and at least start working. Then prepare for a challange of the 7241?
Is that a possible scenario?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi wcord
Sorry I could have been clearer, I have passed the 7242 and im working now. I may be able to sort out the paperwork from various bosses back home to challenge the 7241 though it would probably be a bit of a hassle, but from what it seems it would probably be worth it. Just wondering what the point is in the 7242 qualification as the 7241 covers it all?
 

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The point is that they can push through unqualified industrial electricians to work in the mines, mills etc. Like the Chinese in the Tumbler ridge coal mines. Get your construction ticket and be able to work anywhere. The problem is that because there is such a shortage of qualified electricians in this provence that now apprentices don't have to have all thier hours to go to school and can take the schooling out of order if there are no spots available. The results are going to be an influx of bad electricians and lots of poor quality and unsafe installations and maintenance.
 

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This is a huge problem. I have worked in Fort Mac with an imigrant that took the three month industrial electrican course in Ontario. He got his industrial certification gets paid the same as all the other electricians and he can't even use a cordless drill. Pathetic.
 

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This is a huge problem. I have worked in Fort Mac with an imigrant that took the three month industrial electrican course in Ontario. He got his industrial certification gets paid the same as all the other electricians and he can't even use a cordless drill. Pathetic.
I could go to Fiji, sit a test for electrical then come back, sit my regs here and be a registered electrician with a practicing license in 2 months, its bollocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies guys, I must admit this idea of regulated and unregulated trades is a bit new to me, back home your either an electrician or your not, The idea of being able to legally work with electricity without formal qualification seems so dangerous!:eek:
 
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