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Having Trouble Finding GE Parts

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Hey folks

I have a customer who wanted to add a mini split in their office. On inspecting their panel, I discovered this absolute fustercluck. In some slots we have 3 wires per terminal.
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I won't pretend to know everything, can I get more of these sliders to add on to the neutral bar? And how do they install? It appears they're secured in place with a melted plastic rivet and I don't want to undo that if its not replaceable obviously.

I also have an older GE panel upstairs with this situation. Any thought to rectify this? It may be a little hard to tell, but the ground wire comes up and is then attached to a lug that's attached to the mounting hole on the can.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for taking the time to read the post. Let me highlight a section you may have overlooked.

The second set of photos are a different panel, in a different location, with a different problem.

So unless you're suggesting that I run my neutrals from a panel downstairs and land them in a panel upstairs, I'll just assume you didn't understand the content.
 

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Who says the isolated neutral bar has to be GE?

There was a time where more than one wire could be landed under the same screw, as long as it was the same size. Since you did not provide the panel information we can not help you.

I fail to understand the concept of providing pictures that do not pertain to the question.
 

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I would take the EGCs off and wire nut them together and reduce the number if them. That should free up a lot of terminal spaces.
 

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That's a mess. The feed is 4-wire? Then you have the ground and neutrals all mixed up on the neutral bar? The can is bonded to the feed ground and the circuits leaving the panel are bonded to the neutral? Then there is that bare al from an SEU or SER cable that's terminated on the neutral bar and touching the grounded parts of the panel reestablishing a ground/neutral connection which kind of defeats the purpose of a 4-wire feed.

Did a licensed electrician install this?
 

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I see this a lot with older GE and other brands too. They were too lazy to put neutral wiring in separate openings, even when the openings were available. I think you'd have to read the installation instructions for any particular brand to see how many conductors can be installed in an opening. Neutral or ground. I have the impression that the grounding bars may allow more than one, that neutrals were always one per opening, that said, that may me urban legend.
 

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Maybe didn't know. Truthfully, may have been ok. I see this a lot in 80's panels. I don't have any access to install instructions and you may have been correct. As long as there is space for me to land new circuits, I'll get over it. That last pic is exactly what I see in period GE and Siemens.
 

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Those panels were junk when they purchased them, and now they want to complain that there aren’t enough neutral or ground bar connections? Install some ground bars to move the grounds to and free up the few neutral openings they originally provided.
 

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Dave's idea may have been the way to go. I'm so programmed (maybe a generation or two behind) to one neutral per opening. There was no doubt that many of these panels of that era were light on neutral connections. Adding a ground bar is about the only way to go with a service panel.
 
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