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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can these be jumped off of the bath gfci circuit?


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I guess you could. A ground fault would certainly be better than a regular breaker.

Personally siting on an electrical device with my naked butt is not something I will do.
I am aware that a lot of these things are less than 50v. Still bare butt and bare feet on the ground just cruising for a bruising in my thinking.
The idea of having a 120v outlet near the toilet concerns me. I have put telephone outlets in the stool areas many times, and ringing is 90v.
Just not my cup of tea
 

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I've only done one myself, last fall, and I put a GFCI receptacle in because it was still within the zone of the sink (small bathroom).

What's the difference between a heated seat and, say, an electric blanket?

Barring manufacturer's instructions or specific code (don't think CEC has one), what logical explanation could there be for having a GFCI?

I guess that's veering off the original topic though....
 
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I just looked at one of those seats and it was almost 8 amps. It was an older house so no dedicated bathroom circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Today I got the pdf on the seats and manufacturer states dedicated 15A per seat.

They have 3 bathroom receptacles on a 20a ckt.

So we need to pipe out of the basement up and back into the attic and do 2 drops.

This turned into looking at there panel and seeing it was out of date and only 100A. 1980’s neighborhood where the contractor did all underground 100 amp service on all these massive homes.

Needless to say these damn toilet seats turned into a 200’ underground service upgrade. They approved and placed deposit.

These seats must be heaven.


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Call me old fashioned, but I feel like I'm in a 1st world country if I don't have to walk thru snow to get to the out-house !
Geez... is the bathroom not heated ?? :LOL:

Now if we go thru another TP shortage, I might re-consider the bidet part
 

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Today I got the pdf on the seats and manufacturer states dedicated 15A per seat.

They have 3 bathroom receptacles on a 20a ckt.

So we need to pipe out of the basement up and back into the attic and do 2 drops.

This turned into looking at there panel and seeing it was out of date and only 100A. 1980’s neighborhood where the contractor did all underground 100 amp service on all these massive homes.

Needless to say these damn toilet seats turned into a 200’ underground service upgrade. They approved and placed deposit.

These seats must be heaven.


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Try it out before you tell the homeowner it's done. Let us know.............
 

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I just looked at one of those seats and it was almost 8 amps. It was an older house so no dedicated bathroom circuit.
I'm roughing in a huge finished basement and noticed their toilet has a pump and heated seat, 7.6 amps dedicated line, wasn't on the plans. So after I call the GC I got to wondering if the inspector would laugh if I put an in-use bubble cover on it.

People and their thousand dollar poop pots.
 

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Can these be jumped off of the bath gfci circuit?


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Reading 210.11 It states bathroom receptacles. It does not say that the circuit shall only supply the ones required for the sink. So IMO, as long as the receptacle is in the bathroom it can be off of the bathroom receptacle circuit.

Now older homes may be an issue but as long as the circuit can handle the load go for it but I would be inclined to run a new circuit in an older home that doen't have dedicated circuits.

(3) Bathroom Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of
branch circuits required by other parts of this section, at least
one 120-volt, 20-ampere branch circuit shall be provided to
supply the bathroom(s) receptacle outlet(s). Such circuits shall
have no other outlets.
 
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They need a dedicated circuit. The ones I’ve wired up all had a cord on them and just need a 15 or 20 amp circuit with a GFI.

The lower end toilets just need the GFI close to the toilet. The high-end ones might need to have a GFI breaker instead. LOOK OVER THE CUT SHEET FIRST before you quote the job! We hooked one up in a million dollar home and the electrical and plumbing needed to be in very specific spot before the tpilet could be installed. This required removal of sheetrock, plumbing & electrical rough in, new sheet rock & paint, and the the plumber came back to set the toilet.
 

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When my brother was in his last days, he could wipe, I bought him the best remote controlled heated, air dry, front back bidet I could find. I connected it to the load side of the bathroom sink GFCI receptacle.
The first thing to happen was the remote control battery door disappeared. Otherwise, the gfi never tripped, and it’s still working.
 

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Pretty sure it can fit just fine on an already dedicated 20A bathroom circuit. Unless the user is going to be using a hair dryer, curling iron, and the hot water flush of the bidet all at the same time. That said - if it's an easy run for a new circuit, why NOT put it in?

And yes... These are heaven.
 
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