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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello there,

Heard good things about the site, happy to be apart of it.

I am starting an apprenticeship this upcoming Monday and am just looking to make sure I am in a good position to excel.

What exactly is expected of a first year electrician?

I have a fairly good understanding of conduit bending, fixtures, 2 and 3 way switches, GFI's, motion sensors, basic circuits, etc. I have a number of certifications including, asbestos training, fall arrest, young employee safety, ladder safety, lockout and tag out and First aid.

I have high aspirations for this trade as my career and I wanna make sure I dont blow it! lol

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance!
 

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Journeyman
Joined
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135 Posts
Hello there,

Heard good things about the site, happy to be apart of it.

I am starting an apprenticeship this upcoming Monday and am just looking to make sure I am in a good position to excel.

What exactly is expected of a first year electrician?

I have a fairly good understanding of conduit bending, fixtures, 2 and 3 way switches, GFI's, motion sensors, basic circuits, etc. I have a number of certifications including, asbestos training, fall arrest, young employee safety, ladder safety, lockout and tag out and First aid.

I have high aspirations for this trade as my career and I wanna make sure I dont blow it! lol

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance!
Just listen to your boss, do everything as quickly as you can and you'll be fine. He'll teach you as you go but pay attention when he shows you the first time. The worst possible thing to do is to show someone how to do something multiple times without them getting it.

One more thing; STUDY THE CODE. If you muck up on something and the inspector refuses the installation, it'll make you & your boss look bad in front of the customer.

Other than that, welcome to the trades! :thumbup:
 

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Registered
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2,173 Posts
Keep your feet happy.

Keep a clean area, hourly its less trouble at the end of the day.(pssst stay busy)

Be on the job, ready to go daily.

Respect the job, respect your co-workers, respect the other trades.

Make note of the total jobs aspects how your work job is to be completed
have all material and equipment. Don't take short cuts.

Act Safe, Look Safe, Be Safe!!!

Good Luck, sounds like your ready to enjoy a rewarding vocation.

Welcome :thumbsup:
 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
Joined
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39,117 Posts
Show up on time.
Keep accurate records of the times and places you worked.
Keep accurate inventory records if this is your job.
Stock the truck after using something.
Maintain company tools.
Constantly improve your knowledge and mechanical skill.
Clean up your work area.
Minimize mistakes.
Use scrap material where possible.
No side jobs except for your mom.
Study if enrolled in apprenticeship.
Keep up with the latest NEC and local code amendments.
Don't borrow tools or anything from other workers without permission.

If you borrow something and break/lose it, buy them a new one.
Inform the shop of changes in your contact information.

Learn how to read and understand blueprints, job specs, etc.
Don't bring pets, children, or friends to the job.
Don't leave early without permission.
Don't miss days without a good reason.
Ask for time off well in advance.
Schedule vacation in writing. Keep a copy.
Advise job supervisor when you can not work overtime.
No working on live circuits if you're not qualified.

You get a paycheck for working, not just showing up.
Don't expect much in the way of gratitude from anyone.
Be pleasant to customers regardless. Or leave.
Don't quote a price to anyone for anything.
Plan your work. Work your plan.
Evaluate your work each day on the way home.
Help load and unload the trucks bringing material.
Don't use the couple top steps of a ladder.

Do not climb up the ‘back side’ of a ladder.
No smoking. Period.
Do every job the best way you know how.
Observe the work of other trades.
Look over electrical work wherever you can.

If you’re not sure, ask.
Read trade publications and manufacturers literature.
Attend trade shows.
Check material against invoice before signing for it.

No swearing, vulgar language or off-color/racist remarks.
Thank your boss for your job now and then.
If you ever get a bonus, say thanks.
Drive safely with seat belt in place.
Store material in the truck so the load will not injure you.
Tie down all ladders and other objects on the roof.
Cover material to protect it from the elements.
Wear appropriate clothing for the elements.
Have a spare set of work clothes just in case.
Keep your first aid kit stocked and readily available.

Tools are not disposable. They are intended to be used more than once.
Know the location of the nearest emergency clinic and how to get there.
Update your first aid and CPR skills.
Notify the supervisor when damage is caused.

If you’re the last one out the door at the end, lock it.
Observe daily weather reports to anticipate hazardous changes.
Drink fluids to avoid heat stroke. Wear a hat in the sun.

Use tools only for the use they were intended.
Do not over-extend break and lunch periods.
Have several pair of dry gloves ready in winter.

If you find a lost tool, try your best to locate the proper owner.
Keep your job car in good working order.
Keep your hand tools in good working order.

No vulgar or offensive clothing (t-shirts, hats, etc.)
Be truthful when responding to supervisors.
Try to get a variety of work experience.
Volunteer for a difficult job now and then.
Go along to get along.
Put everything back where you got it.
The floor is not your personal garbage can.
Neither is the top of drop-ceiling tiles.
Care for your injuries. Stay healthy.

Own up and admit to your mistakes.
Don't take chances on ladders or scaffolding.
Don't take chances with live power.
Build up a backup set of hand tools for the day when yours are taken or lost.
Keep all company material and tools secure.
Do not use unsafe equipment. Report it immediately.
Replace hacksaw blade as often as needed.
Replace utility knife blade as often as needed.
Don’t be afraid to report theft /abuse / illegal activity.
Don't wear jewelry.
Don't antagonize or fight with other workers. Walk away.
Help other workers as needed.
Keep the radio volume at a reasonable level, if a radio is allowed.
Alcohol and drugs are absolutely forbidden.
Wear safety glasses and ear protection as appropriate.

Check your shoes/boots before entering the finished area of a building.
Be cautious working on new buildings during lightning storms.
When lifting, observe proper back position.
If something is too heavy for you ask for help.
Wear proper footgear to protect ankles from uneven ground.
Wear hard sole shoes where sharp objects like nails are present.
Wear a hard hat as required or where sensible.
Maintain GFCI in good working order.
Return phone calls promptly.

Use all safety equipment when required to.
Fill out paperwork everyday. Don’t wait until next week.
Listen closely to what you are told.
Always verify what you are told with the Codebook.
Turn your time card in well in advance of when it’s due.
This isn’t just a job……. It’s a career.
The more you put into your career, the more you will get out of it.


Your cell phone is no excuse for not working!
Put on a belt and pull up your pants to your waist!
 

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RIP 1959-2015
Joined
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10,750 Posts
Hello there,

Heard good things about the site, happy to be apart of it.

I am starting an apprenticeship this upcoming Monday and am just looking to make sure I am in a good position to excel.

What exactly is expected of a first year electrician?

I have a fairly good understanding of conduit bending, fixtures, 2 and 3 way switches, GFI's, motion sensors, basic circuits, etc. I have a number of certifications including, asbestos training, fall arrest, young employee safety, ladder safety, lockout and tag out and First aid.

I have high aspirations for this trade as my career and I wanna make sure I dont blow it! lol

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance!
Welcome to the electrical trade,:thumbup:

Chances are you will "blow it a few times" every guy here learned from their mistakes.

"I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work."

 
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