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fertilizer distrubuter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some of you have said you only use 12 wire.I would like to just say 14 is superior to 12 wire in certain situations. I will only discuss residental.

Consider:
1. general purpose receptacles, 14 wire puts less pressure both on the box edges and the terminations.

2. Dedicated refrigerator, Come on refrigerators are like 6 amps tops now.

3. Lighting, most lighting circuits will never see more than 12 amps or 20 60 watt fixtures. Once again termination pressure yada yada yada.

4.Gas Furnace, once again only 4 or 5 amps.

Most electrical problems are caused by poor terminations not overloaded wire. I think we could all agree 14 wire fits better on screw terminations and puts less pressure on the device.

I only use larger wire when I must such as bathrooms kitchen counter tops and appliances greater than 15 amps.

What reasons would you, hypothetical straw man, use to justify not ever using it?
 

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Electrical Contractor
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A guy is taking his girlfriend to the prom. He waits in the ticket line for a long time but finally get 2 tickets. He goes to rent a limo. The rental line is really long but eventually he's able to rent the limo. He goes to buy her flowers. The line at the florist is really long but he's finally able to buy her a nice bunch of roses. Finally, they arrive at the prom. They are there only for a short while and his girlfriend asks him to go get some punch. He goes to the refreshment table and there's no punchline.............:whistling2::whistling2::drink::drink:
 

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Senior Lurker
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A guy is taking his girlfriend to the prom. He waits in the ticket line for a long time but finally get 2 tickets. He goes to rent a limo. The rental line is really long but eventually he's able to rent the limo. He goes to buy her flowers. The line at the florist is really long but he's finally able to buy her a nice bunch of roses. Finally, they arrive at the prom. They are there only for a short while and his girlfriend asks him to go get some punch. He goes to the refreshment table and there's no punchline.............:whistling2::whistling2::drink::drink:
That about sums it up.l
 

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Some of you have said you only use 12 wire.I would like to just say 14 is superior to 12 wire in certain situations. I will only discuss residental.

Consider:
1. general purpose receptacles, 14 wire puts less pressure both on the box edges and the terminations. Really? If you dress the wire right this is a total non-issue. And remember that people are stupid and will plug in space heaters and other heavy loads into GP recpts so nuisance tripping would be an issue.

2. Dedicated refrigerator, Come on refrigerators are like 6 amps tops now. Yeah but what about those who want a bigger fridge like a Sub-Zero? And voltage drop on startup might be an issue on ANY fridge.

3. Lighting, most lighting circuits will never see more than 12 amps or 20 60 watt fixtures. Once again termination pressure yada yada yada. I agree with this one, except for the termination pressure BS. Now, wiring space in recessed cans j-boxes is another thing....blasted things are too small for #12 for chaining fixtures.

4.Gas Furnace, once again only 4 or 5 amps. Yep, but add on an electrostatic filter, condensate pump, and a work light (hardwired) and a 20 amp circuit would be better.

Most electrical problems are caused by poor terminations not overloaded wire. I think we could all agree 14 wire fits better on screw terminations yes and puts less pressure on the device. BS

I only use larger wire when I must such as bathrooms kitchen counter tops and appliances greater than 15 amps. Cheap bastard, lol. :laughing: #12 isn't all that much more expensive.

What reasons would you, hypothetical straw man, use to justify not ever using it?
See my answers above in red.
 

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fertilizer distrubuter
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1,250 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The heater argument always suprised me.

A heater generaly is 12 amps. 12 amps will not trip a 15 amp breaker. 2 heaters are 24 amps and will trip both a 15 and a 20 amp breaker.

I have never seen a furnace with so much auxiliary equipment it would exceed 12 amps can you honestly say you have?

Do you plan all of your motor circuits sized to 350% for startup voltage drop or just refridgerators?

The things you cite seem to be the extreme exception rather than the rule.
 

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Estwing magic
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27,423 Posts
6 amp refrigerator? You must mean 6 amp wine cooler. You really need to go to an appliance store. It's like the soccer moms are having a biggest $%&% contest except soccer moms don't have %$%@'s.
 

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cog
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5,292 Posts
Some of you have said you only use 12 wire.I would like to just say 14 is superior to 12 wire in certain situations. I will only discuss residental.

Consider:
1. general purpose receptacles, 14 wire puts less pressure both on the box edges and the terminations.

2. Dedicated refrigerator, Come on refrigerators are like 6 amps tops now.

3. Lighting, most lighting circuits will never see more than 12 amps or 20 60 watt fixtures. Once again termination pressure yada yada yada.

4.Gas Furnace, once again only 4 or 5 amps.

Most electrical problems are caused by poor terminations not overloaded wire. I think we could all agree 14 wire fits better on screw terminations and puts less pressure on the device.

I only use larger wire when I must such as bathrooms kitchen counter tops and appliances greater than 15 amps.

What reasons would you, hypothetical straw man, use to justify not ever using it?
This is wrong..

A guy is taking his girlfriend to the prom. He waits in the ticket line for a long time but finally get 2 tickets. He goes to rent a limo. The rental line is really long but eventually he's able to rent the limo. He goes to buy her flowers. The line at the florist is really long but he's finally able to buy her a nice bunch of roses. Finally, they arrive at the prom. They are there only for a short while and his girlfriend asks him to go get some punch. He goes to the refreshment table and there's no punchline.............:whistling2::whistling2::drink::drink:
wrong.

That about sums it up.l
Wrong.

See my answers above in red.
Thats all wrong...

My biggest concerns are device pressure and why is their no toilet paper.
wrong-o

The heater argument always suprised me.

A heater generaly is 12 amps. 12 amps will not trip a 15 amp breaker. 2 heaters are 24 amps and will trip both a 15 and a 20 amp breaker.

I have never seen a furnace with so much auxiliary equipment it would exceed 12 amps can you honestly say you have?

Do you plan all of your motor circuits sized to 350% for startup voltage drop or just refridgerators?

The things you cite seem to be the extreme exception rather than the rule.
Nope. Wrong.

6 amp refrigerator? You must mean 6 amp wine cooler. You really need to go to an appliance store. It's like the soccer moms are having a biggest $%&% contest except soccer moms don't have %$%@'s.
Nuh-uh...

After how long?
No. Wrong question.


....and here is my argument :

View attachment 32214
 

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Moderator
Estwing magic
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27,423 Posts
The heater argument always suprised me.

A heater generaly is 12 amps. 12 amps will not trip a 15 amp breaker. 2 heaters are 24 amps and will trip both a 15 and a 20 amp breaker.

I have never seen a furnace with so much auxiliary equipment it would exceed 12 amps can you honestly say you have?

Do you plan all of your motor circuits sized to 350% for startup voltage drop or just refridgerators?

The things you cite seem to be the extreme exception rather than the rule.
A residential condensing furnace can easily exceed 12 amps without any auxiliary equipment.
 
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