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I think your username says it al "slow for the cones" I'm a flagman on the rual highways. Not that it matters but I spent thirty years in California as an electrician, union, non-union, government, contractor, superintendent ect. If you really are all that and a candy bar you wouldn't have to talk yourself up to be the king of electricians and now the frosting "Im an engineer all hail me". If your guys aren't certified they're not working any big jobs. Again I'll say you don't pay attendtion to details. The OP was looking for ways to get in the field and I suggested three things which you said were all wrong but, you must have agreed to one "start calling contractors". Northern California huh, let me guess S.F.. Work the high rises, large retail malls and the petro chemical plant. Design all the systems and do all the programing all my yourself. What a guy.
I was trying to explain IBEW is not all that great. I went thru the whole thing and I didn't split. I got benched often and got tired of being on the damn bench. Not stable income when you have a family and bills to pay. So I took the next best thing and not a textbook scab. I climb the ladders with my crew. And yes they hold I do not work SF jobs.
 

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Welcome to the forum! Best to check your local union for an apprenticeship program. You can also do this with any open shop. You might have a hard time getting in with the economy the way it is right now though.
 

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Town Drunk
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Welcome! :thumbsup:
 

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If you get down to my comment without having a headache, there are two basic ways (there may be others but these are the easiest)
1) go visit your local union hall. Talk to them, ask questions and see what they have to offer.
2) Go visit several local electrical contractors and tell them you would like to get on as a helper and see what they have to offer.
Logically there are benefits to both routes. My suggestions is follow #1 and #2 above and then make your own decisions based on your own research.

I've been an electrician for 18 years. I started when I was 16 years old and got in on a private, non union apprenticeship and it worked well for me because they really took the time to train me in all aspects of electrical work including theory, application and more. I worked for both Union and Private companies and again, both have benefits. However, my one suggestion is make sure they teach you how to "think". There are alot of companies that teach you how to do a task correctly. Not alot teach you why to do that task in the first place. Finding a good apprenticeship program (union or private) is worth its weight in gold. Just my $.02
 

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Ahh, didn't know we turned into a humor forum.:thumbsup: He forgot to mention be paid less and get fewer benefits.
Not true at all, the difference is Union guys get paid on the same scale regardless of thier value to an employer. The smart, hard working, inovative guy gets paid the same as the lazy guy that takes as many breaks as possible, does shoddy work, and drinks a six pack at lunch.

Non union guys get paid based on thier value to thier employer, they get paid what they are worth. Not all shops work this way, but the good ones seem to.

I have been both and made much more non union than I did as a GF union.
 

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iv been a electrician for 5 years now and just got laid off and was thinking about going
union but don't know where to start my location is anaheim ca...thank you
 
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