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fertilizer distrubuter
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A good way for you to think of phases abyss is to think of your wires as points and the connections between them as the phase.
Draw two dots (Wires) then draw a line between them. That is one phase. Then add a third dot and connect them as a triangle. Now you have 3 lines thus 3 phases. As you see two wires create one phase it cannot be different. For two phases you must then need 4 wires. If you ever head to Pennsylvania you will see that is true.
Remember there is no voltage In a single wire only between wires and points.
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
I almost hate to slow this thread down for what it was really about, but I have found my answer. The Homeline (Square D) line has many different styles of panelboards. I had to dig a little bit, but found specs on all of their panelboards:

http://www.schneider-electric.com/p...51210-residential/6030-homeline-load-centers/

I think someone may have mentioned this, but many of their offerings (including mine) use a rejection style buss or breaker to limit the number of available circuits. My 30 cannot become a 60, etc...

Now that this issue is cleared up for me, please carry on with phasing issues (my house is 120/240 single phase..... I think). :jester:
 

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Pool Shark
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A good way for you to think of phases abyss is to think of your wires as points and the connections between them as the phase.
Draw two dots (Wires) then draw a line between them. That is one phase. Then add a third dot and connect them as a triangle. Now you have 3 lines thus 3 phases. As you see two wires create one phase it cannot be different. For two phases you must then need 4 wires. If you ever head to Pennsylvania you will see that is true.
Remember there is no voltage In a single wire only between wires and points.
Thanks Ultrafault, I enjoyed your comments.

In my research here are some things I've learned over the years. Hope you find it helpful.
When speaking of electricity, energy is defined as the ability to produce work from a potential difference. We call this potential difference voltage.
Force and voltage are one and the same, just nomenclature.
In producing electrical force from induction, we produce a force with both speed and magnitude. We call this a vector quality because it has both speed and magnitude.
In producing electrical force through induction, multiple phases can be created and in doing so, a phase shift is required.
A phase shift is required so the relative peak values of each phase are out of time with one another, or in time with one another.

For example in a 208v/120 4wire WYE three-phase, the three phases are shifted out of time by 120 degrees. We can calculate the phase to phase RMS voltage by the sq root of 3, 120x(1.73) = 208v
 
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