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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im currently wiring a physician's doctors office. Alot of hospital grade mc cable but with the inspectors blessing got it approved to use all purpose cable on anything above ceiling. Was elated to not have to use the hospital grade mc on all my 2×4 light fixtures meaning not having to take that ground to the dog houses! What a time saver.
 

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What is all purpose cable?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BBQ you might want to take a look at 517.11 (patient care vicinity) my interpretation when it says and extending vertically not less than 7 1/2 ft above the floor) I think that your hots and legs coming down to your switches must be hospital grade mc. Your whips in between lights dont have to be. Whats your opinion?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes It has an aluminum ground in it that you bend back 120 degrees past the sheath and cut off and when you insert the cable into the connector and tighten that gives you your ground. Just make sure that locknut is tight or you could potentially lose it.
 

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BBQ you might want to take a look at 517.11 (patient care vicinity) my interpretation when it says and extending vertically not less than 7 1/2 ft above the floor) I think that your hots and legs coming down to your switches must be hospital grade mc. Your whips in between lights dont have to be. Whats your opinion?

I don't think he was disagreeing with you.

The cable you are calling hospital grade mc, Is actually called Health Care Facilities Cable of HCFC for short.
 
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BBQ you might want to take a look at 517.11 (patient care vicinity) my interpretation when it says and extending vertically not less than 7 1/2 ft above the floor) I think that your hots and legs coming down to your switches must be hospital grade mc. Your whips in between lights dont have to be. Whats your opinion?
That is the way I was taught. If the wire goes below 7.5 feet and the device opens into a patient care area it needs to have a redundant ground.
Regular MC still can not be used for the lights above 7.5 feet in a patient care area but AC can, see the exceptions to 517.13(B), the insulated conductor is not required but a metallic raceway recognized as an EGC is.

Roger
 

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Yes It has an aluminum ground in it that you bend back 120 degrees past the sheath and cut off and when you insert the cable into the connector and tighten that gives you your ground. Just make sure that locknut is tight or you could potentially lose it.
I didnt think there was approved connectors for AP that had a locknut
I always use the Arlington snap in connectors
 

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Regular MC still can not be used for the lights above 7.5 feet in a patient care area but AC can, see the exceptions to 517.13(B), the insulated conductor is not required but a metallic raceway recognized as an EGC is.

Roger
Thanks Roger I have seen some inspectors interpret the 7 1/2ft rule and let regular m/c go.
 

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BBQ you might want to take a look at 517.11 (patient care vicinity) my interpretation when it says and extending vertically not less than 7 1/2 ft above the floor) I think that your hots and legs coming down to your switches must be hospital grade mc. Your whips in between lights dont have to be. Whats your opinion?
As roger said, the exception that allows the 7-1\2'(517.13 (B)(1)(3) ex. #2) points back to 517.13(A), which says the metallic raceway, armor, or sheath shall itself qualify as an EGC, which regular MC does not.
Like you I have most definitely seen regular old mc used for lighting in areas considered to be patient care.
 

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Thanks Roger I have seen some inspectors interpret the 7 1/2ft rule and let regular m/c go.
Then those inspectors need to go back to school !

I disapprove about 35% of ceiling inspections in patient care areas as the EC does not use the proper wiring methods. It has become such an issue that I printed out copies of 517.13 to give to the electrician when discussing it with them.
 
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