Electrician Talk banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Conservitum Americum
Joined
·
9,055 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have three different wall sconces and all three have different wattages of lamps to use. 40, 60, 75.

My question is how do the makers of these determine what wattage they will handle? Why are the 40 watt rated devices not rated for 60 watts when they are made the exact same way as the others?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,762 Posts
I have three different wall sconces and all three have different wattages of lamps to use. 40, 60, 75.

My question is how do the makers of these determine what wattage they will handle? Why are the 40 watt rated devices not rated for 60 watts when they are made the exact same way as the others?
The sockets? Or the fixture itself?

Ratings are based on heat buildup in the fixture.
 

·
Conservitum Americum
Joined
·
9,055 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·

·
Sparks fly from my finger
Joined
·
2,530 Posts
I know the government regulates lights on ceiling fans. That is why you either get 3 60 watt candelabra bulbs or 4 40watt ones. That is also the reason for that lovely little wattage limiter that blows when the bulb burns out.


Before government regulation it was based on heat dissipation and operating temp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
dmxtothemax said:
It's mostly about how much heat that the fixture can take without melting or failing. And it's based of incandesant lamps. So a 75w fitting can cope with the heat from a 75w incandesant lamp. :thumbsup:
Watts are watts. Heat doesn't care if it is produced by an incandescent, halogen, sodium, CFL or LED.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top