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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
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The right employees can make or break your company, especially if you've got teams in the field not under your direct control. No matter how great a crew you put together, eventually you'll need to add new electricians to your crew. There's an art to hiring the right person, to make sure you've got someone who will fit in with everyone else in the company. If you want to avoid having to go through this process again in a couple of months, get it right the first time. It's Hard to Find Good Help These Days: Tips for Finding Better Help
Hiring new electricians can be a chancy gamble at the best of times.

What's your best hint for finding the right employees?
 

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animal lover /rat bastard
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same way you find a good wife, good girlfriend, good dog, good beer, good house, good lawyer, etc.

trial and error, and you pay through the nose.
 

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Currently I invited one of my students to work with me, is the best of the class and already won a competition. Also he likes this job, he seems a hard worker and interested.
 

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Small Potatoes
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View attachment 131438

Hiring new electricians can be a chancy gamble at the best of times.

What�s your best hint for finding the right employees?
1. You charge the right price.
2. You pay and offer benefits that are better then anyone else.
3. You have a culture that people want to be in and would never think of leaving.
A) You treat them with respect, dignity and offer a real career path.
B) You give them quarterly reviews and raises once a year based on performance with a minimum cost of living raise.
C) You're transparent, honest and you do what you say your going to do for them based on well defined expectations. They know before they get hired what those expectations are.
4. You hire on attitude first, then on skill set.
5. You grow your own organically. When able, you hire the best students with the best attitudes out of the trade schools and train them.
6. You ask to be on the school boards of local trade schools or your local HS and teach the trade opportunity to those not suited or not wanting to go to college.
7. You have a set of core values that everyone in the company lives by and that you hire and fire from. You hire only the best people and give the rest to your competitors.

After a while, you'll develop the reputation for the place to work and have more candidates show up at your door.




Or, you can just get union guys not working and pay them off the books. :vs_laugh:
 

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We weed through a TON of duds.

You can't spot the winners by way of any job application.

The very best EMT benders are dyslexic, BTW.
 

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1. You charge the right price.
2. You pay and offer benefits that are better then anyone else.
3. You have a culture that people want to be in and would never think of leaving.
A) You treat them with respect, dignity and offer a real career path.
B) You give them quarterly reviews and raises once a year based on performance with a minimum cost of living raise.
C) You're transparent, honest and you do what you say your going to do for them based on well defined expectations. They know before they get hired what those expectations are.
4. You hire on attitude first, then on skill set.
5. You grow your own organically. When able, you hire the best students with the best attitudes out of the trade schools and train them.
6. You ask to be on the school boards of local trade schools or your local HS and teach the trade opportunity to those not suited or not wanting to go to college.
7. You have a set of core values that everyone in the company lives by and that you hire and fire from. You hire only the best people and give the rest to your competitors.

After a while, you'll develop the reputation for the place to work and have more candidates show up at your door.

This ^^^^

It all starts with #1 on this list. If you don't get that right, you won't get anything else right.
 

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It's been my experience for the last few companies I've worked for that very few guys stay at a company past 2-3 years. That number gets even smaller once you get past the 5 year mark.

When I first started doing electrical work, it was very common to hear guys say that they had been at a company for 5,10,15,20 years. However, that's not the case anymore. My thoughts are this is partly due to the newer generations of workers, our current culture and the new ways that businesses and contracting oprerates.
 
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