Electrician Talk banner
61 - 73 of 73 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
Of course math is important in this trade. Examples:
  • Basic math (Counting properly, adding, subtraction, etc.)
  • Fractions for reading a rule and measuring on prints
  • Ratios for scaling on drawings
  • Basic geometry for conduit bending
  • Being able to figure out & remember formulas (for electrical power/engineering formulas & some conduit bending)
  • Most importantly, the math needed to properly compute your paycheck.
I know there are apps for conduit bending but you need to understand the basics to become a top notch conduit man.

Even with things like Ugly’s books it will make more sense if your math skills are good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Are you in a union? The local here, you have to take an algebra test just to start the apprentice program. I just went to a trade school. We still had to do the algebra, but we could use calculators. But they showed us the math on how to calculate. Other than that, no idea. Like someone else said, its not like your doing advanced algebra. Pretty basic stuff.
Are you in a union? The local here, you have to take an algebra test just to start the apprentice program. I just went to a trade school. We still had to do the algebra, but we could use calculators. But they showed us the math on how to calculate. Other than that, no idea. Like someone else said, its not like your doing advanced algebra. Pretty basic stuff.
Nah, not in the union.
 

·
Registered
Low Voltage, Multi-Family Residential Electrical Construction, Fire Alarm and Life Safety
Joined
·
115 Posts
The math is something that you don't want to "get around" due to the fact that if you had to make an argument as to why you're right and the engineer is wrong, you're not going to have a leg to stand on.
 

·
Registered
Residential, lite comm., Industrial
Joined
·
305 Posts
I dont know if anyone is curious or already knows this ; I looked up the reason for the particular order of operations that we use and discovered this:

They are doing something similar to what electricians do when faced with a fault on a long string of devices. Divide and conquer, or in other words get the most eliminated at one time.

The order is using the operations that cover the "most ground" first, then the next most. Since adding and subtracting covers the least ground/material/numbers, they do it last.

65 y/o and still learning basic math concepts. That is how bad i am at math. Nevertheless, I can wire a new house without plans or prints, program a PLC to make a machine run the way i want it to; troubleshoot an E-stop system, or any other control system, including VFD's; anything required in an industrial environment except PID/process controls which i have never been exposed to.
 

·
Registered
36th year apprentice & Floor Sweeper
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
What’s algebra? Is it like pushing beads back and forth on rods? :oops:

“C’mon Algebra, this is no place for you!” Anybody remember that line?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I worked at Lockheed many years ago. They wanted me to take a shop math course on my own time. I told the company "no, you have to test me FIRST to find out if I need the class." They lost the argument.

Test day. They took my calculator. The test included square root long hand and many other really hard manual concepts all trig functions, K factors etc etc...(very easy with calculator).

When they took the calculator I asked them: Why are you taking my calculator"
answer (question) : What if the batteries go dead?
Answer: it is battery plus solar cell.
Answer (question): What if the lights go out?
Answer: This is Lockheed, if the lights go out we all go home.
He didn't buy it.

I didn't miss a single question, that really pissed management off. I earned my Journeyman in the shortest time ever on record because I didn't take any classes, except Ansi Y14.5M geometric dimensioning and tolerance. However that class was given by the authors of Y14.5M so I wanted it and loved it. Found out later I passed with higher scores than most engineers and management.
They even had to waive some of my minimum hours to journeyman in the end. I was working two/three grades up regularly. Fun Memories.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Crappy math kill make a crappy sparky. Good math skill make an average sparky a good sparky. Great math skill make a good sparky a great sparky.
This. Math is what raises us above the animals (meaning liberal arts majors.)

That said, literally everyone is capable of learning enough algebra to be a great electrician. Or MEP engineer, for that matter.
 
61 - 73 of 73 Posts
Top