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Estwing magic
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If you're talking resi, the maximum available that I know of is 84. I'm sure if a manufacturer wanted to make a 300 circuit panel, it would be okay.

With all the dedicated circuits required by code, 42 circuit panels don't get you very far these days.
 

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Yes they did delete the 42 cir rule and now some manufacturers are making larger panels. I still like using smaller sub panels around the home rather than one large panel especially on the larger homes that we do.
 

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If the homeowner gets confused by a few panels or does not know they have them then I feel sorry for them. I will usually have one panel in a bedroom wing that does that area only.

The house we are doing now I have one in the laundry area that feeds the kitchen , dining and laundry. The other is in the bedroom area and feeds the bedroom circuits and the living room near the bedrooms.

I don't think it takes a rocket scientist to figure it out
 

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Chairman of the Bored
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If the homeowner gets confused by a few panels or does not know they have them then I feel sorry for them. I will usually have one panel in a bedroom wing that does that area only.

The house we are doing now I have one in the laundry area that feeds the kitchen , dining and laundry. The other is in the bedroom area and feeds the bedroom circuits and the living room near the bedrooms.

I don't think it takes a rocket scientist to figure it out
sure you know
HO's? lol

in a big ass house like you do, I suppose it'd be okay but HO
s are numbskulls about electric
 

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Part of the reason I want sub panels is because I don't want to run 125' homeruns especially with afci circuits. IMO that's looking for trouble. Instead I have homeruns that average 30 or 40 feet.

It is also very cost effective in many situations
 

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Dennis Alwon said:
Part of the reason I want sub panels is because I don't want to run 125' homeruns especially with afci circuits. IMO that's looking for trouble. Instead I have homeruns that average 30 or 40 feet. It is also very cost effective in many situations
That's how we did it when i wired homes. Big customs would get a 125 amp 24 space sub on the second floor to handle all the bedroom circuits. Definitely came in handy for second floor laundry rooms too.
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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Part of the reason I want sub panels is because I don't want to run 125' homeruns especially with afci circuits. IMO that's looking for trouble. Instead I have homeruns that average 30 or 40 feet.

It is also very cost effective in many situations
Dennis how do you root your home runs when you're going through an attic you go along the perimeter of the attic and keep the runs perpendicular or do you go diagonal? do you ever use running boards and nail the cables to the side of them and stack them on top of the attic joist.also any tips on running the cables under in the basement we have crawlspaces here in California usually a couple 2ft crawl space underneath the house.also do you split up rooms with your receptacles are you keep rooms on the same circuit how many receptacles do you like to put on a circuit?
 

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village idiot
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We do separate sub panels as well. Typically I will do a 100 amp sub panel in the second floor mechanical room and a 200 amp main panel for the first floor and a 200 amp main panel for the basement on a 320 amp service. If we are doing a 600 amp service, then we do 2 200 amp mains in the basement and a 200 amp disconnect and then do another 200 amp main in the second floor mechanical room.

We had a call not long ago from the general contractor of a 13,000 sq ft house. The owner was suing because of poor electrical wiring. He is a financial broker sort of person, and has lost 3 computers since the home was completed. We were called in as a third party to figure out what's going on. We noticed right away all the panels were in the basement and the owners office was on the top floor all the way on the other end of the house. Tested it and found 91 volts. After a whole bunch of digging through the attic and picture taking we were subpoenaed and had to testify that the home runs were in 14-2 on a 15 amp breaker and were 175 ft or longer the way they were run. Now we are doing an estimate for the same house to add a panel on the second floor and get all those home runs into that panel instead. What a pain in the arse.
 

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Dennis how do you root your home runs when you're going through an attic you go along the perimeter of the attic and keep the runs perpendicular or do you go diagonal? do you ever use running boards and nail the cables to the side of them and stack them on top of the attic joist.also any tips on running the cables under in the basement we have crawlspaces here in California usually a couple 2ft crawl space underneath the house.also do you split up rooms with your receptacles are you keep rooms on the same circuit how many receptacles do you like to put on a circuit?
Sorry but you have reached the "two question limit" any further questions will be obliterated.

This message will self destruct in 10-9-8-.........:jester:
 

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Estwing magic
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We do separate sub panels as well. Typically I will do a 100 amp sub panel in the second floor mechanical room and a 200 amp main panel for the first floor and a 200 amp main panel for the basement on a 320 amp service. If we are doing a 600 amp service, then we do 2 200 amp mains in the basement and a 200 amp disconnect and then do another 200 amp main in the second floor mechanical room.

We had a call not long ago from the general contractor of a 13,000 sq ft house. The owner was suing because of poor electrical wiring. He is a financial broker sort of person, and has lost 3 computers since the home was completed. We were called in as a third party to figure out what's going on. We noticed right away all the panels were in the basement and the owners office was on the top floor all the way on the other end of the house. Tested it and found 91 volts. After a whole bunch of digging through the attic and picture taking we were subpoenaed and had to testify that the home runs were in 14-2 on a 15 amp breaker and were 175 ft or longer the way they were run. Now we are doing an estimate for the same house to add a panel on the second floor and get all those home runs into that panel instead. What a pain in the arse.
Sounds like a money job. By "pain in the arse", I assume it's going to be uncomfortable sitting on a fat wallet?
 

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Dennis how do you root your home runs when you're going through an attic you go along the perimeter of the attic and keep the runs perpendicular or do you go diagonal? do you ever use running boards and nail the cables to the side of them and stack them on top of the attic joist.also any tips on running the cables under in the basement we have crawlspaces here in California usually a couple 2ft crawl space underneath the house.also do you split up rooms with your receptacles are you keep rooms on the same circuit how many receptacles do you like to put on a circuit?
It depends on the attic but generally I will run the wires at the outer edge of the attic where there is no chance of someone walking on them. We are doing one now where we have to run the wire at the high end so we will use a running board where it goes around the chimney otherwise I would just run it on the vertical wall (in this case).

I usually will put the master bedroom receptacles on its own circuit and then I put two bedrooms on one circuit. I then feed all 3 rooms with a lighting circuit. Nothing special- others may do it differently. Some times we run the master bedroom lights and recep. on the same cir.

I don't count receptacles for circuits but rather do it by rooms. I will usually feed the living room & dining room on their own circuits (2 cir). I also put the laundry lights and bath lights on their own circuit since they don't have to be afci.

Lately I have told my guys that all outdoor receptacles should be taken off circuits that don't require afci or we just run a circuit for them.

Every house is a bit different so we are a bit flexible in the circuitry
 
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I like to use a lot of circuits & a lot of wire. It's not a bid winner

For instance, i like all my receptacle outlets on 12 , and lighting circuits on 14

I'll also dedicate anything remotely suspected of needing it, most of my normal kitchens having 5-6 circuits minimum

Subs make that easier , but it's always a 110.26 fight to do so

~CS~
 
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