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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There was an open permit for a sun-room addition for a house being sold, the rough was performed by a previous home-owner. He got the rough signed off, installed plugs and switches, but never got the finish back in 2001. I get the new permit and run into the inspector later that morning at the supply house. I ask him if he wants everything brought up to today's standards ( arc-fault, tr receptacles, etc). He says: "If you feel like it, I'm not going to bust balls on that job, just want to get the permit/paperwork finalized" So I change the plugs to TR, install arc-fault, and he fails me because the 3-gang switch plate is sticking off the wall. I've heard of the 1/8" max gap allowed between wallboard and box, is there a max allowable distance a plate can sit off the wall?
 

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Estwing magic
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The plate is snug against the box. It looks crappy but it isn't dangerous. Fail goes to the inspector.

How many guys use a steel 2104 box with a blank plastic plate as a JB? Looks chitty but I have never seen it fail. Same diff here.
 

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Which side of the box is sticking out?

The side that is nailed to the stud or the other?

If it's not the side nailed to the stud, then use a Madison bar/jiffy clip/battleship strap/F clip and pull it into the wall.

If its the side that nails to the stud/ take a hammer and pound it back. Then if you need then discreetly drive a screw through the side into the stud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The stud side was sticking out, bake-o-lite box. There was a little play in the box where I was able to sink a screw into the stud and suck the box in a little. The first picture is the after-fixed picture, 2nd pic was before. I sent him the pics via text and talked to him on the phone he said he would sign off, but sheesh. No code violation that you guys can see, right? Should've asked for his code reference in writing, we have the right to make this request. I didnt want to piss him off so I just appeased him
 

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What section did he cite? Closest thing I can think of is 314.21
Repairing Noncombustible Surfaces. Noncombustible surfaces that are broken or incomplete around boxes employing a flush-type cover or faceplate shall be repaired so there will be no gaps or open spaces greater than 3 mm (1⁄8 in.) at the edge of the box.
Unless I'm reading it wrong, that doesn't strike me as a rule suitable for the NEC. I guess the purpose is to close gaps that could allow flame spread? But a box with a cover tight to the surface encloses the ignition sources. Whether there's space between the box and the wall seems like the builder's problem.
 

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Estwing magic
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Which side of the box is sticking out?

The side that is nailed to the stud or the other?

If it's not the side nailed to the stud, then use a Madison bar/jiffy clip/battleship strap/F clip and pull it into the wall.

If its the side that nails to the stud/ take a hammer and pound it back. Then if you need then discreetly drive a screw through the side into the stud.
I like the F-clip idea. I have used a Hackzall with a fresh metal blade to cut the screw/nails. Works good as long as you're sure you're not cutting wire as well.
 

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There was an open permit for a sun-room addition for a house being sold, the rough was performed by a previous home-owner. He got the rough signed off, installed plugs and switches, but never got the finish back in 2001. I get the new permit and run into the inspector later that morning at the supply house. I ask him if he wants everything brought up to today's standards ( arc-fault, tr receptacles, etc). He says: "If you feel like it, I'm not going to bust balls on that job, just want to get the permit/paperwork finalized" So I change the plugs to TR, install arc-fault, and he fails me because the 3-gang switch plate is sticking off the wall. I've heard of the 1/8" max gap allowed between wallboard and box, is there a max allowable distance a plate can sit off the wall?
Does this job involve a GC?

Because an open permit is usually because he stiffed the EC out his rough walls payment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No GC on the job, the home-owner did his own permit and wired it himself. Funny thing is the original permit was called a dining room addition, and the plugs were wired in #14. Inspector signed off the rough, I even told him that the about the #14 he didn't seem to be concerned about that, but a plate sticking off the wall........ that needed to be addressesd
 

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Estwing magic
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I get the new permit and run into the inspector later that morning at the supply house.
I can make some assumptions:

1) The inspector was at the supply house picking up material for a side job and considers you his competition.

2) The inspector was at the supply house for free donuts so I suggest you bring your own donuts to your next inspection.
 

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Not that it matters although. Interesting. I was working in arizona and the inspector would write the code violation article number on a red tag. Show it to you and if you had a question he d say get your code book and he would point it out as you read it. I think they should all do it that way.

learning to learn
 

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There was an open permit for a sun-room addition for a house being sold, the rough was performed by a previous home-owner. He got the rough signed off, installed plugs and switches, but never got the finish back in 2001. I get the new permit and run into the inspector later that morning at the supply house. I ask him if he wants everything brought up to today's standards ( arc-fault, tr receptacles, etc). He says: "If you feel like it, I'm not going to bust balls on that job, just want to get the permit/paperwork finalized" So I change the plugs to TR, install arc-fault, and he fails me because the 3-gang switch plate is sticking off the wall. I've heard of the 1/8" max gap allowed between wallboard and box, is there a max allowable distance a plate can sit off the wall?
What section did he cite? Closest thing I can think of is 314.21 Unless I'm reading it wrong, that doesn't strike me as a rule suitable for the NEC. I guess the purpose is to close gaps that could allow flame spread? But a box with a cover tight to the surface encloses the ignition sources. Whether there's space between the box and the wall seems like the builder's problem.
Maybe this: 404.9(A)

(A) Faceplates. Faceplates provided for snap switches
mounted in boxes and other enclosures shall be installed so
as to completely cover the opening and, where the switch is
flush mounted, seat against the finished surface.
 

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Best just to intentionally leave the inspector something to humor him. Something obvious yet easy to fix. A flagrant code violation with no less than 3 exceptions.

Pace your astonishment at his knowledge and before he's finished bloviating about exception 3, headquarters will prompt him, one of your hands will have corrected the problem, and you'll simply follow him to his truck for your green tag.
 

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Thank ****ing god I don't have to deal with these re tarded inspectors anymore. I'm referring to inspectors AND the bozos that write the code.
Nice, rub it in. :jester:

I'm truly happy for you.
 
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