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Hello, I am 26 and have been a helper for the past three years. I recently moved to Tennessee for non-work related reasons, and I am looking for employment. I previously lived in North Carolina, and was under the impression that a helper needed to work for four years under an electrician, then simply pass the exam to become licensed.

I have been applying and contacting companies about helper positions, but I am alternatively looking at other ways to increase my experience in the electrical field and get on a direct path to obtaining my license. I have had trouble understanding the .gov website requirements on getting a license. It makes it sound as if passing the exam is all that's needed, without any mention of work experience. I would definitely need to study some to take an exam, a little more on the job experience would definitely be beneficial.

I have looked into apprenticeship with the IBEW, but that requires a 5-year commitment and will not be open for applicants until November for 2016. It seems like I shouldn't have to go through a full 5-year apprenticeship program, and that my three years should count for something.

What exactly is required to become an electrician? I have been searching online but everything points towards either apprenticeship programs or schooling. How can someone who has been working in the field without a structured program get a license, or do they have to start from square one with an apprenticeship?

Thanks.
 

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My friend took the test just out of high school & received his license. You would benefit greatly by going through ibew, there is no better program.
 

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It looks like TN does not have a journeyman classification (same here in NC). If you want to have some credentials, I suggest you sit for the LLE exam.
 

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It looks like TN does not have a journeyman classification (same here in NC). If you want to have some credentials, I suggest you sit for the LLE exam.
That is part of what was confusing on the .gov website, I found the LLE but not Journeyman. It made it sound like no experience was needed for the LLE, only the exam. So, is this an equivalent?
 

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Hello, I am 26 and have been a helper for the past three years. I recently moved to Tennessee for non-work related reasons, and I am looking for employment. I previously lived in North Carolina, and was under the impression that a helper needed to work for four years under an electrician, then simply pass the exam to become licensed.
Things have changed since I got my first license and every state is different
But I got my 1st JW card with 2.5 years in the trade, I was hardly an electrician but I passed the test and got the raise I wanted.


I have been applying and contacting companies about helper positions, but I am alternatively looking at other ways to increase my experience in the electrical field and get on a direct path to obtaining my license. I have had trouble understanding the .gov website requirements on getting a license. It makes it sound as if passing the exam is all that's needed, without any mention of work experience. I would definitely need to study some to take an exam, a little more on the job experience would definitely be beneficial.
Look into the ABC program for schooling. Take some code classes no matter what route you take.

I have looked into apprenticeship with the IBEW, but that requires a 5-year commitment and will not be open for applicants until November for 2016. It seems like I shouldn't have to go through a full 5-year apprenticeship program, and that my three years should count for something.
Previous experience seldom matters to the IBEW, they have their rules and they stick to them. They feel all you have learned is bad because you did not learn it from an IBEW electrician. That is a bit harsh but many in the IBEW believe that.

What exactly is required to become an electrician? I have been searching online but everything points towards either apprenticeship programs or schooling. How can someone who has been working in the field without a structured program get a license, or do they have to start from square one with an apprenticeship?

Thanks.
As I said it varies from state to state, you need to get some Tenn. electrician to help you with the answers.

GOOD LUCK
 

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Hello, I am 26 and have been a helper for the past three years. I recently moved to Tennessee for non-work related reasons, and I am looking for employment. I previously lived in North Carolina, and was under the impression that a helper needed to work for four years under an electrician, then simply pass the exam to become licensed.

I have been applying and contacting companies about helper positions, but I am alternatively looking at other ways to increase my experience in the electrical field and get on a direct path to obtaining my license. I have had trouble understanding the .gov website requirements on getting a license. It makes it sound as if passing the exam is all that's needed, without any mention of work experience. I would definitely need to study some to take an exam, a little more on the job experience would definitely be beneficial.

I have looked into apprenticeship with the IBEW, but that requires a 5-year commitment and will not be open for applicants until November for 2016. It seems like I shouldn't have to go through a full 5-year apprenticeship program, and that my three years should count for something.

What exactly is required to become an electrician? I have been searching online but everything points towards either apprenticeship programs or schooling. How can someone who has been working in the field without a structured program get a license, or do they have to start from square one with an apprenticeship?

Thanks.
Hello 108....

Look here
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Welcome to the forum.....:thumbup:
 
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