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Seeing how your wireway above panel is already hung.. There's no real need in taking it down now..

What I would do, starting from the "left to right" I'd use a "straight-edge" or 4ft level marking myself a verticle "control line" on the wall, above the Panel. Measuring from the control line, laying out my holes on the bottom of wireway, matching punched hole(s) on the top of Panel.

*Don't rely on that sheetrock wall to the right of the panel, for a control-line measurement in laying this work out, and punching your KO holes.

* Currently, without the "end-caps" on the above wireway, you should have enuff flexibility in setting conduit w/a attached connector into panel KO's first, then walking top-end of pipe w/ connector into the wireway..

*Just so I'm understanding your posting correctly, was this what you were inquiring, method of easy installation (?)

If having misinterpreted your posting, my bad..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Seeing how your wireway above panel is already hung.. There's no real need in taking it down now..

What I would do, starting from the "left to right" I'd use a "straight-edge" or 4ft level marking myself a verticle "control line" on the wall, above the Panel. Measuring from the control line, laying out my holes on the bottom of wireway, matching punched hole(s) on the top of Panel.

*Don't rely on that sheetrock wall to the right of the panel, for a control-line measurement in laying this work out, and punching your KO holes.

* Currently, without the "end-caps" on the above wireway, you should have enuff flexibility in setting conduit w/a attached connector into panel KO's first, then walking top-end of pipe w/ connector into the wireway..

*Just so I'm understanding your posting correctly, was this what you were inquiring, method of easy installation (?)

If having misinterpreted your posting, my bad..
No my work is actually completed to this point.

My main question was regarding whether I shouldve mount the trough before or after I extended the pipes.

I was getting flack from the office because I mounted it using option A

edit: the panel you see below is just temporary
 

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If the "office" wants to do my work (as a Craftsman)..

*Let them get their phu-ckin "tools-out" & I always remembering where parking my vehicle.. * And It's just that simple..

*Have a safe evening..

*I returned to "Edit this posting".. *This "off the cuff posting" actually did bother me all night, till finally me falling asleep.

*We all having or moments as humans, and your office personnel being no different MPCXL. (No one is excluded)

Bottom line is we all having to work together & get along, which sometimes could prove to be difficult.

MPCCXL you are there to help keeping the Kon "in the black ink" and this being what helps -YOU- in continuing drawing a paycheck also.


*We're all here to make money, and your office being no different.

*It's called "Team Work' mpcxl.. *And no Company will continue to exist or prosper, w/out carrying the same mentality mindset.


*Enjoy your work young man, have safe day @ the office turning them tools & keeping a smile..
 

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A I guess ?

As it is now the correct option is option C. Measure and cut one length of conduit. Put the conduit in one of the connectors on top of the panel. Slap your magnetic torpedo level on it. Mark the trough for the knock out then use that mark to layout the rest of the knock outs. Drill the ko's, Tell your foreman to order a bunch of 2 piece connectors, cut all the conduit and toss it up there.

I hate drilling ko's up in the air though, you get that metal shrapnel flying everywhere and burning your arms so I would have tried and drilled all the knocks outs while the trough was on the ground, I mark them out and have an apprentice drill them
 

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A I guess ?

As it is now the correct option is option C. Measure and cut one length of conduit. Put the conduit in one of the connectors on top of the panel. Slap your magnetic torpedo level on it. Mark the trough for the knock out then use that mark to layout the rest of the knock outs. Drill the ko's, Tell your foreman to order a bunch of 2 piece connectors, cut all the conduit and toss it up there.

I hate drilling ko's up in the air though, you get that metal shrapnel flying everywhere and burning your arms so I would have tried and drilled all the knocks outs while the trough was on the ground, I mark them out and have an apprentice drill them
Ok, I didn't understand your question, I change my answer, its B. Get all the conduit to the same length, put the connectors onto the conduit and drill the trough out on the ground and slide the trough onto the connectors...but I'm also with dell, tell the office to f off
 

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should have installed the trough first and THEN start your conduit runs.

Other than that, take a piece of heavy cardboard
,place it under the connectors,
hit the cardboard to make indentations,
transfer centers of said indetations to the trough, while on the ground
drill KOs
install trough
 

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should have installed the trough first and THEN start your conduit runs.
Im a little ocd so im going the same way as the distance between holes have to be measured or its going to drive me nuts. I also do not like couplings between the box and the first bend unless i can line them up.
I work mainly with pvc coated ridgid so anything i do with emt looks like crap no matter in what order i install it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Im a little ocd so im going the same way as the distance between holes have to be measured or its going to drive me nuts. I also do not like couplings between the box and the first bend unless i can line them up.
I work mainly with pvc coated ridgid so anything i do with emt looks like crap no matter in what order i install it.
It’s not the first time I’ve had to do this , but sometimes I’m told to run branch emt feeders bass ackwards

im suppose to guess and predict where they’re all going to meet up.

I never said my life was rash
 

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Im still a little confused.. are you going to extend every conduit 1 for 1 through the gutter to the panel below? I would run (4) 2" drops into the top of the tub and call it a day. Plenty of room to route all your circuits down as needed.
Also, option B is how I usually set panels or gutters on top of underground stubs. Don't drill holes any bigger than the draw stud on the KO punch, because hot shrapnel sucks on the arms.
 

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So the question has nothing to do with extending the conduits down to the panel at this point?

If so, then the office was right. I would have drilled and punched every hole needed in the trough first. That would include the holes going up, the holes going down to the future panel, and mounting holes. Then mount the trough and run out the conduits, leaving the conduits out the bottom for when the permanent panels get there. You should have some cuts on the permanent panels. I’m going to guess two 20” wide panels?
 
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I'd rather drill the trough and set it first and make the pipe fit but up there high nobody can see if the spacing is perfectly uniform.

If I had to fit the trough in with the conduits already run, option B, I would loosen the strut straps one by one, plumb the conduit, and tighten the strap. Then use the spacing between the strut straps to lay out the holes on the trough. I'd use a plastic level or something as a story pole to mark the spacing and transfer to the top of the trough.
 

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I'm with the group that would mount the trough 1st (with holes drilled before mounting), PLUS I would not install a trough w/out the endplates on, too easy to warp the top and make the cover hard to fit.

It looks like there is more than 24" between the trough and the panel/s, so derating becomes an issue if the intention is to reduce the number of conduits into the panel. If you are installing 1 for 1 conduits out of the bottom, why even install the trough? Curious as to what's the finishing plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm with the group that would mount the trough 1st (with holes drilled before mounting), PLUS I would not install a trough w/out the endplates on, too easy to warp the top and make the cover hard to fit.

It looks like there is more than 24" between the trough and the panel/s, so derating becomes an issue if the intention is to reduce the number of conduits into the panel. If you are installing 1 for 1 conduits out of the bottom, why even install the trough? Curious as to what's the finishing plan.
90” mdp
 

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mpcxl.. Left you a revised note this morning, in posting #4..

It actually bothered me afterward.

Have a safe day young man..Enjoy your work..
 

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After re reading the first few posts, and seeing you're dropping into an mdp.. I would say plan A is the way.
I would probably still drop a few runs of 2" into the cabinet. Sprinkler overhead so top penetrations should likely be raintight with a gasket.
 

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Sounds like this is a classic case of "That's not the way I would have done it." As long as "your way" results in a product that is of equal quality (appearance and code compliance) and cost (time and materials) to "their way", then it shouldn't matter. If one way is better or faster, that should be the chosen method (Note: if it's your way, be prepared to back it up with hard evidence.) With ALL that in mind, ultimately with all other things being equal, if the boss says to do it this way, then learn to do it the boss's way, it's their company, be a part of their team. Then when you don't agree on something that's a code violation or dangerous or some other real issue, the boss is more likely to hear your side of things.
 

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I would be more curious as to why the left 2 conduits were not kicked the same way as the others.


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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
After re reading the first few posts, and seeing you're dropping into an mdp.. I would say plan A is the way.
I would probably still drop a few runs of 2" into the cabinet. Sprinkler overhead so top penetrations should likely be raintight with a gasket.
I would be more curious as to why the left 2 conduits were not kicked the same way as the others.


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they were routed towards rtu
 

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I've never done this or tried this, but I assume it would work. Go out and buy a $1 ink pad that people use for stamping. Just take it and press it down on each connector so each one has a bit of ink on it. Take a piece of cardboard and press it up against the board. Now you have a template you can work off of. You could probably just take a rubber mallet or something and tap the top of the cardboard and get the same affect without the ink now that I'm thinking about it... The cardboard will just have circular indentions on it. Either that or take a tape measure and make a template by measuring it all out, which is much longer to do... Anyways, then I'd take a pencil and poke a small hole through the center of each connector circle on the cardboard. Take the template to the bottom of the trough and mark through each pencil hole, giving you the center of each KO you'll have to knock out. Knock it out and start adding the pipes one by one. The trough has enough bend in it because the side pieces aren't put on yet. This'll work. Good luck.

Oh and I'd add a piece of strut between the trough and panel. At least then when you're adding each conduit, they don't keep shifting around and popping out of place while adding each conduit to the trough. Also it's just good practice to add a strut there to support the pipes, even if the distance doesn't call for a strap, I'd still put one.
 
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