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animal lover /rat bastard
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how many threads are you going to make on the same subject. Didn't you think to ask what you should have ?
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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scrounge up whatever kind of hand tools you can and put them in a small tool box, for the time being. bring those to work with you Monday, then you can ask them for a tool list.
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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good luck on your new job, 20 story hotel sounds like to be a fast-paced job.
get a haircut if you have black shoes polish them. and hotels it's all about treating the guests with Super Service even the maintenance team.
 

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If you are going to be working on a large commercial project and they are just pouring the floors I being a minimalist would carry just enough to get by.

Linemans, 5/16 or 3/8 screwdriver , channellocks ,level, and a 25' tape , 16oz ballpeen hammer and a hacksaw.

That should take you most of the way through the job until the actual wiring starts.

Then you will need to add a BX cutter and a BX stripper scratchawl, screw starter (Quick Wedge ), dikes, wire strippers , maybe needlenose.

Then when the trim out fixtures are being set and you will to add assorted screwdrivers.

I am a bit old fashion and I still use a Yankee screwdriver if a have a lot of wiring devices to set. They are no longer made but there are always on ebay and you can get the adapter so you can use modern points.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-USA-Stanley-Yankee-R-L-Spiral-Ratchet-Screwdriver-30A-PRISTINE/231234396706?_trksid=p2045573.c100033.m2042&_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20131017132637%26meid%3D6991861388397434094%26pid%3D100033%26prg%3D20131017132637%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D4%26sd%3D231234396706
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hex-Bit-Ada...048?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4aaaec78d0
LC
 

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Lone Crapshooter said:
If you are going to be working on a large commercial project and they are just pouring the floors I being a minimalist would carry just enough to get by. Linemans, 5/16 or 3/8 screwdriver , channellocks ,level, and a 25' tape , 16oz ballpeen hammer and a hacksaw. That should take you most of the way through the job until the actual wiring starts. Then you will need to add a BX cutter and a BX stripper scratchawl, screw starter (Quick Wedge ), dikes, wire strippers , maybe needlenose. Then when the trim out fixtures are being set and you will to add assorted screwdrivers. I am a bit old fashion and I still use a Yankee screwdriver if a have a lot of wiring devices to set. They are no longer made but there are always on ebay and you can get the adapter so you can use modern points. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-USA-Stanley-Yankee-R-L-Spiral-Ratchet-Screwdriver-30A-PRISTINE/231234396706?_trksid=p2045573.c100033.m2042&_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20131017132637%26meid%3D6991861388397434094%26pid%3D100033%26prg%3D20131017132637%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D4%26sd%3D231234396706 http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hex-Bit-Adapter-for-Millers-Falls-Yankee-Stanley-130-30-/320695204048?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4aaaec78d0 LC
Why a ball peen hammer? I have never used one in the trade. Just curious.
 

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Premium Member
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It is like this If you do commercial / industrial work you will do a lot of metal on metal pounding. A ballpein hammer has a softer face than a claw hammer and is not as likely to chip around the edge of the face as is a claw hammer if struck against metal. This comes into play when you are striking a cold chisel or using a center punch.
I was taught this by my father was was a carpenter and learned his trade in the 1930's .

LC
 

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You should find out what kind of work will you be doing. Slinging alot of BX/romex? Hanging EMTS/rigids? or else.

But return what you bought and buy individual tools:
25' Stanley fatmax, good tool pouch, Knipex 9" linesman or klein, proper cable cutter/stripper, level with neodymium magnets, 1/4" flat+#2 phillips, and a non-contact voltage tester. As for other tools/bits find out what you need and buy as you need them.
 

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Lone Crapshooter said:
It is like this If you do commercial / industrial work you will do a lot of metal on metal pounding. A ballpein hammer has a softer face than a claw hammer and is not as likely to chip around the edge of the face as is a claw hammer if struck against metal. This comes into play when you are striking a cold chisel or using a center punch. I was taught this by my father was was a carpenter and learned his trade in the 1930's . LC
Never had a issue with my claw hammer, but also never had it explained to me like this either.
 

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Bring whatever hand tools you have with you, but you probably won't need them. You're the new material b¡tch :)
Sounds about right! I swept the floor for the first few weeks and did deliveries. Don't screw it up though, what you think is stupid and a waste of time, getting the coffee, etc is all part of the test before you get to do any electrical work. Don't think it's not true about doing the sh*t work... I was on a job a few months ago, for 3 weeks everyday we walked by this ibew apprentice, his only tools were the supplied sawzal, gloves, and safety glasses. He cut up the empty skids all day long as light fixtures came off the skids. :thumbup:
 
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