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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve recently gotten hired for an electrician apprenticeship and was wondering if any of you guys could give me some advice. I just turned 18 in July and started working for a home remodeling company as soon as I graduated (3 months ago) and at the home remodeling company, I worked with a skilled, but unlicensed, electrician so I have a small amount of residential experience, but not much. While I was there, we mostly put up lights, outlets, and switches and occasionally we would rewire basements after demo and some extensions. I have spent a lot of time watching and trying to understand what he was doing but without a proper apprenticeship, I was limited to what I could learn as even he admitted he wasn’t a best teacher so I moved companies to the one I will be joining. Any advice is appreciated.
 

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There are some posts in this forum asking this question. The Vets that have/are running successful businesses gave their 2 cents and some great advice. Try using the search function for "starting","apprenticeship" or "advice". You will get a lot of results!

Also Welcome and goodluck!
 

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Welcome to the trade, Carlos!

It sounds like you are well on your way with your electrician apprenticeship. Having paid employment while you learn is a great opportunity. But here are a few other suggestions just in case it doesn't work out.

I would advise steering clear of private trade schools as these are often designed to separate your money from your pocket. Public trade schools are a much better choice and are often taught by very experienced tradespeople.

Check to see if there is a local IBEW hall in your area and inquire about available apprenticeship programs.

Another option is the US Navy. From my experience, large industrial employers absolutely love these people. They are quick to get up to speed and typically very solid performers.

Also, please feel free to use my fraction calculator. I designed it primarily for working with conduit: raybocalc.com

Either way - good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There are some posts in this forum asking this question. The Vets that have/are running successful businesses gave their 2 cents and some great advice. Try using the search function for "starting","apprenticeship" or "advice". You will get a lot of results!

Also Welcome and goodluck!
Ah, I see, I will search up the terms and make sure to take note of the advice that has already been given
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to the trade, Carlos!

It sounds like you are well on your way with your electrician apprenticeship. Having paid employment while you learn is a great opportunity. But here are a few other suggestions just in case it doesn't work out.

I would advise steering clear of private trade schools as these are often designed to separate your money from your pocket. Public trade schools are a much better choice and are often taught by very experienced tradespeople.

Check to see if there is a local IBEW hall in your area and inquire about available apprenticeship programs.

Another option is the US Navy. From my experience, large industrial employers absolutely love these people. They are quick to get up to speed and typically very solid performers.

Also, please feel free to use my fraction calculator. I designed it primarily for working with conduit: raybocalc.com

Either way - good luck.
Thank you for the advice, I will certainly look into those alternate options, I am very excited to be joining the trade
 

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I’ve recently gotten hired for an electrician apprenticeship and was wondering if any of you guys could give me some advice. I just turned 18 in July and started working for a home remodeling company as soon as I graduated (3 months ago) and at the home remodeling company, I worked with a skilled, but unlicensed, electrician so I have a small amount of residential experience, but not much. While I was there, we mostly put up lights, outlets, and switches and occasionally we would rewire basements after demo and some extensions. I have spent a lot of time watching and trying to understand what he was doing but without a proper apprenticeship, I was limited to what I could learn as even he admitted he wasn’t a best teacher so I moved companies to the one I will be joining. Any advice is appreciated.


Here are some in-depth guided steps to preparing for an electrician career.
  • Do Research.
  • Meet Minimum Requirements.
  • Prepare Yourself.
  • Complete an Apprenticeship.
  • Check Local Licensing Requirements.
  • Consider a Pre-Apprenticeship.
  • Apply for an Apprenticeship.
  • Register if Required.
 

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If your region (state?) has a Trades Authority body, I recommend contacting them first.

I question if an unlicensed electrician/contractor can officially sign off your time.
 

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I’ve recently gotten hired for an electrician apprenticeship and was wondering if any of you guys could give me some advice. I just turned 18 in July and started working for a home remodeling company as soon as I graduated (3 months ago) and at the home remodeling company, I worked with a skilled, but unlicensed, electrician so I have a small amount of residential experience, but not much. While I was there, we mostly put up lights, outlets, and switches and occasionally we would rewire basements after demo and some extensions. I have spent a lot of time watching and trying to understand what he was doing but without a proper apprenticeship, I was limited to what I could learn as even he admitted he wasn’t a best teacher so I moved companies to the one I will be joining. Any advice is appreciated.
Lets start with the basics.
Where are you located it makes a difference for us to give advice.
You did not say if the new job is union and does it include employer paid school.
Either way YOU need to keep track of the hours worked and the type of work done. If you move states this will be important one way or the other.

Cowboy
 
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Lets start with the basics.
Where are you located it makes a difference for us to give advice.
You did not say if the new job is union and does it include employer paid school.
Either way YOU need to keep track of the hours worked and the type of work done. If you move states this will be important one way or the other.

Cowboy
I am in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.
 

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I am in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.
Ok your good.
Pa don’t require a license or test in most areas.
just follow my advice about keeping track.
after 40 years as a electrician with paperwork I moved out of Pa and I would of had that challenge the board in Colorado if I needed JW papers but I could of got it maybe. I just went with industry/ulitity here no papers required.

Keep learning I’ll send my book to you on Monday to help

cowboy
 

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Cowboy, Thank you Sir! This is non union, private company and no schooling offered but I would like to get my license eventually.
 
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