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Light Emitting Decoration
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The lamp legislation puts a stop on manufacturing of general purpose incandescent lamps producing a range of output between 1490-2600 lumens and consuming more than 72W, or in layman's language, "the 100W light bulb" effective 1/1/2012.

I guess its time to go stock up on a few hundred of them for personal use.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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I sure do wish they'd bring back my DDT bug spray.

I just don't think my AC feels as comfortable since it's not using R-12 Freon.

And you'll be able to have my mercury-filled thermostat when you pry it from my cold, dead hands.

:whistling2:

-John
 

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Leaded gas always sealed your cylinders/rings better..
And there's nothing to legally kill weeds with in Toronto anymore.
Can't backwash the Chlorinated pool water into the storm drain anymore (guess it may clean the lake)

Too bad the CFL lamps are so much more harmful to the environment then the good old incandescent lamp.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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Too bad the CFL lamps are so much more harmful to the environment then the good old incandescent lamp.
You'll need a source for this. Are CFLs the be-all-and-end-all of light bulbs? Of course not. Do they contain mercury? Yep. But so does the smoke from coal-fired power stations. Is there energy use that goes unaccounted for in the production of these lamps? You bet. Just like in incandescents.

CFLs are a step. Even if it's only a shade better than what we had before, it's still better. If you do nothing, that's exactly what you can expect to achieve.

-John
 

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You'll need a source for this. Are CFLs the be-all-and-end-all of light bulbs? Of course not. Do they contain mercury? Yep. But so does the smoke from coal-fired power stations. Is there energy use that goes unaccounted for in the production of these lamps? You bet. Just like in incandescents.

CFLs are a step. Even if it's only a shade better than what we had before, it's still better. If you do nothing, that's exactly what you can expect to achieve.

-John
I hated CFLs. Can't dim most of them. I listened to some congressional testimony on them. One representative asked what about my constituents (I think in Arizona) where outside temperatures would be way over 100? The expert said there is a capacitor in them which will fail prematurely. Then one from Alaska asked about her constituent's outside garage lights. They won't fire up when it's too cold the expert said. And what about the disposal costs? They have about 5 grams of mercury, disposal will cost $3 to $5 each.

But I went to buy a replacement for a 90 watt flood light over my garage and all I could get was a 28 watt CFL. I was skeptical but I must admit that the light color, brightness, and quality is comparable and it's been on since last September (I never turn off certain lights, I'm not an energy savings kinda guy) and there's been no problem with it. Funny watching it come on for the first time as the phosphors started glowing at the center spiraling outward. OK, for garage lights I'll agree to it but for anything else, I think I'll be stocking up on a lifetime supply of A lamps just in case. BTW, how do you dispose of them, the recycling trash?
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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...I listened to some congressional testimony on them. One representative asked what about my constituents (I think in Arizona) where outside temperatures would be way over 100? The expert said there is a capacitor in them which will fail prematurely.
I use CFLs in all our plants in the vapor-tight lights. They're mounted base-up, enclosed, in a high-temperature environment. So, without question they burn out faster than they should. I get about 3 months of constant usage out of them, when I should get a year. But I was getting 1 month each out of incandescant lamps, so I'm making out better and still being more efficient. And c'mon: I didn't see the congressional testimony, but if anyone seriously claimed that all CFLs from all the manufacturers have the same capacitor that will always fail prematurely, that is definitely not the type of person you want to take technical advice from.
And what about the disposal costs? They have about 5 grams of mercury, disposal will cost $3 to $5 each.
Disposal is free in a lot of places, in that you're paying for it with the price of the bulb. You don't pay an additional fee to get rid of it.
But I went to buy a replacement for a 90 watt flood light over my garage and all I could get was a 28 watt CFL. I was skeptical but I must admit that the light color, brightness, and quality is comparable...and there's been no problem with it...OK, for garage lights I'll agree to it but for anything else, I think I'll be stocking up on a lifetime supply of A lamps just in case.
Not trying to be a smartass, but seriously, if you see that the light quality is decent (much better than they used to be) and it lasts, and it's efficient, why wouldn't you buy them? I'm honestly curious.
BTW, how do you dispose of them, the recycling trash?
Once in a blue moon, I'll break one, and it does go out in the trash, mercury and all. Otherwise Home Depot has drop off points, and so do most cities. It's pretty easy to get online find a place near you that'll take 'em.

Personally, I've never had to recycle any. No kidding, for about 5 years all my lamps have been CFLs, and I haven't had one burn out yet. :thumbsup:

-John
 

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animal lover /rat bastard
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I think you should stock up on bulbs too. Rent an extra space and fill it up with the bulbs. take a pic and don't forget to post it.
 

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I use CFLs in all our plants in the vapor-tight lights. They're mounted base-up, enclosed, in a high-temperature environment. So, without question they burn out faster than they should. I get about 3 months of constant usage out of them, when I should get a year. But I was getting 1 month each out of incandescant lamps, so I'm making out better and still being more efficient. And c'mon: I didn't see the congressional testimony, but if anyone seriously claimed that all CFLs from all the manufacturers have the same capacitor that will always fail prematurely, that is definitely not the type of person you want to take technical advice from.Disposal is free in a lot of places, in that you're paying for it with the price of the bulb. You don't pay an additional fee to get rid of it. Not trying to be a smartass, but seriously, if you see that the light quality is decent (much better than they used to be) and it lasts, and it's efficient, why wouldn't you buy them? I'm honestly curious. Once in a blue moon, I'll break one, and it does go out in the trash, mercury and all. Otherwise Home Depot has drop off points, and so do most cities. It's pretty easy to get online find a place near you that'll take 'em.

Personally, I've never had to recycle any. No kidding, for about 5 years all my lamps have been CFLs, and I haven't had one burn out yet. :thumbsup:

-John
"I use CFLs in all our plants in the vapor-tight lights. They're mounted base-up, enclosed, in a high-temperature environment. So, without question they burn out faster than they should. I get about 3 months of constant usage out of them, when I should get a year."

"Personally, I've never had to recycle any. No kidding, for about 5 years all my lamps have been CFLs, and I haven't had one burn out yet. :thumbsup:"

I'll just take you at your word :laughing:
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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I use CFLs in all our plants in the vapor-tight lights. They're mounted base-up, enclosed, in a high-temperature environment. So, without question they burn out faster than they should. I get about 3 months of constant usage out of them...
Which is worst-case scenario CFL usage.
...when I should get a year.
Because they're rated for 10,000 hours.
Personally, I've never had to recycle any. No kidding, for about 5 years all my lamps have been CFLs, and I haven't had one burn out yet.
Because the lamps in my place are also rated at 10,000 hours, only mine aren't in vapor-tight globes. Each light might get used for 4 hours a day, so how many years does that come to before it burns out?
I'll just take you at your word :laughing:
You'd learn more if you did! :lol:

-John
 

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My first concern about cfls was the bluish light they emit. Since then the soft white is available and I am okay with them. As far as I know the biggest problem with the cfls is the delicacy of the squiggley lamp as far as twisting them into place. Other than that I believe they are a good start.
 

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Which is worst-case scenario CFL usage.Because they're rated for 10,000 hours.Because the lamps in my place are also rated at 10,000 hours, only mine aren't in vapor-tight globes. Each light might get used for 4 hours a day, so how many years does that come to before it burns out?You'd learn more if you did! :lol:

-John
So which is it, 10,000 hours which is just short of 7 years at 4 hours a day or 3 months which is around 2160 hours with constant usage? Sorry about being unable to believe two contradictory things at the same time. I'm not a creation of George Orwell.

You're teaching me more and more every day John. :no:
 

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So which is it, 10,000 hours which is just short of 7 years at 4 hours a day or 3 months which is around 2160 hours with constant usage? Sorry about being unable to believe two contradictory things at the same time. I'm not a creation of George Orwell.

You're teaching me more and more every day John. :no:
It really does not matter. What matters is that you keep records of when you bought them and when you installed them, and if you have the guts to take them back if they don't last long enough. I do ...and, I will.
 

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Donuts > Fried Eggs
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So which is it, 10,000 hours which is just short of 7 years at 4 hours a day or 3 months which is around 2160 hours with constant usage?
It's both.

The ones in my plants fail fast because they are used contrary to their suggested use: Base up, enclosed, in high temperatures.

The ones in my apartment are used like they're supposed to be, so they've lasted as long as they're supposed to.

I mean, c'mon brother: You may disagree with me about wanting to use CFLs everywhere. But you admitted yourself that you have a CFL that has been running constantly for 11 months, so obviously I can't be completely full of it.

If you're that dead-set on not using them, then by all means, don't. My opinion is that they're a much better technology, so I would hope that people would give them a serious shot before deciding that the only solution is to stock up on incandescent lamps.

-John
 

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It's both.

The ones in my plants fail fast because they are used contrary to their suggested use: Base up, enclosed, in high temperatures.

The ones in my apartment are used like they're supposed to be, so they've lasted as long as they're supposed to.

I mean, c'mon brother: You may disagree with me about wanting to use CFLs everywhere. But you admitted yourself that you have a CFL that has been running constantly for 11 months, so obviously I can't be completely full of it.

If you're that dead-set on not using them, then by all means, don't. My opinion is that they're a much better technology, so I would hope that people would give them a serious shot before deciding that the only solution is to stock up on incandescent lamps.

-John
"The ones in my plants fail fast because they are used contrary to their suggested use: Base up, enclosed, in high temperatures."

Uh OH!!! Do I detect a self admitted code violation here? Horrors!:w00t:
Shhhhh. If you won't tell, neither will I. :whistling2:

Personally I've never liked fluorescent lamps for most purposes but I will admit that they can be useful for general office, industrial, and even task lighting. :surrender: But except in a few applications, not for general lighting in a home. My basement has a lot of chain hanging fixtures but except for the outside garage light they're the only ones so far. I've noticed a considerable improvement in the T8s over the way they were say 20 years ago. Much brighter, much closer in luminousity to the F40T12s which were and remain my favorites. I look forward to the day when LEDs replace everything else. Of course they do contain trace amounts of arsenic among other things. :nuke:
 

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The heat generated by incandescent bulbs is not wasted in WA. The heat in my house is on 10-11 months of the year. It is supplemental heating. In residential settings here, fluorescents are better suited for exterior lighting.
 
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