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I just failed electrical inspection because my #6 ground wire was taped green and was told it needs to be solid green insulation. After reading 200.6 I see that the grounded conductor (Neutral) needs to have outer sheath permanently marked. Is he correct?
 

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I just failed electrical inspection because my #6 ground wire was taped green and was told it needs to be solid green insulation. After reading 200.6 I see that the grounded conductor (Neutral) needs to have outer sheath permanently marked. Is he correct?
What are you wiring?
Are you running cable or individual conductors?

Edit: The ground (EGC) and neutral are two separate conductors.
 

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Take a utility knife and strip off the insulation. Inspector wont know.

If I was him I would let it slide, but they always go after the little things:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
meadow said:
Take a utility knife and strip off the insulation. Inspector wont know. If I was him I would let it slide, but they always go after the little things:rolleyes:
I was thinking of that or even but splicing both ends :) he also got me for not bringing EGC through both transfer switches continuously
 

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I was thinking of that or even but splicing both ends :) he also got me for not bringing EGC through both transfer switches continuously
:laughing: As long as its bonded who cares. Sounds like an anul inspector. What he doesn't know wont hurt:whistling2:
 

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backstay said:
EGC? Grounding Electrode Conductor? Did he give you a code ref, if not I don't respond.
EGC and GEC have different rules.
 

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A GEC cant have any splices unless its an irreversible weld/crimp... in lay mans terms that means a continuous wire from panel to rode/water bond.
 

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A GEC cant have any splices unless its an irreversible weld/crimp... in lay mans terms that means a continuous wire from panel to rode/water bond.
I splice them with a crimp a lot. Take a situation where the GEC is sized correctly when I do a panel change, but it only has one rod. I set another rod and crimp a wire to the original GEC.
 

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I splice them with a crimp a lot. Take a situation where the GEC is sized correctly when I do a panel change, but it only has one rod. I set another rod and crimp a wire to the original GEC.

Not saying you cant but in a new install its easier to just avoid it as much as you can. Kind of like splices in a panel.

And not all crimps are rated as irreversible, correct? Ive always thought all were rated like that but I don't know.
 

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Not saying you cant but in a new install its easier to just avoid it as much as you can. Kind of like splices in a panel.

And not all crimps are rated as irreversible, correct? Ive always thought all were rated like that but I don't know.
I use these.
  • E-Z-Ground® connectors are designed for direct burial and offer a safe, efficient alternative to exothermic welding products.


http://www.tnb.com/ps/fulltilt/index.cgi?part=BC202

 

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A GEC cant have any splices unless its an irreversible weld/crimp... in lay mans terms that means a continuous wire from panel to rode/water bond.
There's more to it.

The GEC would be the conductor going from the panel to the water pipe. But you can splice on another conductor to go from there to the rods, and that does not have to be irreversible because it's a bonding jumper and not a GEC.

The same with 2 panels, you can splice onto the GEC going into one panel with a non-irreversible splice to bring the bonding jumper into the second panel.
 

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There's more to it.

The GEC would be the conductor going from the panel to the water pipe. But you can splice on another conductor to go from there to the rods, and that does not have to be irreversible because it's a bonding jumper and not a GEC.

The same with 2 panels, you can splice onto the GEC going into one panel with a non-irreversible splice to bring the bonding jumper into the second panel.
And if the water pipe is plastic? Then I can skip the GEC?
 
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