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I hope I'm posing the ? correctly, but by using a meter how do you identify say the neutral on a contactor if no schematics are available? Thanks, still learning, and just looking to learn a little more. Typically, I think it would be L1 on the contactor, but how can I verify?
 

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Are you asking about coil connections?

Explain a little more. Is it a motor starter, a lighting contactor, magnetically or mechanically held?
 

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If you're referring to the coil it doesn't matter. L and T terminals are for your line and load conductors
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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tsteverose said:
I hope I'm posing the ? correctly, but by using a meter how do you identify say the neutral on a contactor if no schematics are available? Thanks, still learning, and just looking to learn a little more. Typically, I think it would be L1 on the contactor, but how can I verify?
If your talking about a combination motor starter, there is no neutral to speak of. But if you are sure a neutral has been wired thru the contactor, check the conductor to ground. But that neutral had better be identified.

L1/L2/L3 are the line side for the ungrounded phase conductors. They will be on top,.
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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Now keeping with identifying the line/load.

My co-worker who is retiring next month almost did not make it.

He was sent to see why a GFCI receptacle bank on a loading dock wasn't working.

This is were he almost lost it.

The receptacles were piped out of a 3 phase 208, 60 amp disconnect that feeds a compactor.
They grabbed 1 phase from the "load" side and had dragged a neutral thru the disconnect from a panel.
He opened the disconnect and seeing that the 2 of the 3 phases had 30 amp fuses and 1 phase had a 60 amp fuse "feeding" the receptacles.
It was #10 wire thru-out.
He reached in and grabbed the 60 amp fuse. This is when he was hit and knocked to the ground. He is a big guy, 300+ pounds.

The disconnect was a bottom feeder and was energized the whole time.
The sad part is our Electrical shop boss had Ok'ed this install and oversized fuse.

Check twice,, or retirement will be only a dream.
 

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BBQ said:
I hook up lighting contactors with the coil terminals marked L, C & O.
Same here. But most dp contactor coils are marked a1 and a2 I think....maybe. I don't know. I can hook up control panels on auto pilot and half blind nowadays
 

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Now keeping with identifying the line/load.

My co-worker who is retiring next month almost did not make it.

He was sent to see why a GFCI receptacle bank on a loading dock wasn't working.

This is were he almost lost it.

The receptacles were piped out of a 3 phase 208, 60 amp disconnect that feeds a compactor.
They grabbed 1 phase from the "load" side and had dragged a neutral thru the disconnect from a panel.
He opened the disconnect and seeing that the 2 of the 3 phases had 30 amp fuses and 1 phase had a 60 amp fuse "feeding" the receptacles.
It was #10 wire thru-out.
He reached in and grabbed the 60 amp fuse. This is when he was hit and knocked to the ground. He is a big guy, 300+ pounds.

The disconnect was a bottom feeder and was energized the whole time.
The sad part is our Electrical shop boss had Ok'ed this install and oversized fuse.

Check twice,, or retirement will be only a dream.
Your electrick shop boss should be looking for a good lawyer.
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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bobelectric said:
Your electrick shop boss should be looking for a good lawyer.
Would be nice,, but it would never happen.
 
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